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Old 04-23-2016, 09:53 AM   #7
squeezablysoft
 
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Originally Posted by Yakatori View Post
No, it will not. Don't worry about your major. Your major's not really so important, at this particular point, just starting out. As much as it's so much more important to get off to a relatively good start, make the adjustment to a totally different type of course-load and environment. And do as well as you possibly can in those classes you do take.

Truthfully, depending on the major, the introductory or survey-level pre-requisite classes are mostly useful for screening or qualifying people out of the more advanced, better classes within the major, the more valuable part of what you're actually paying for in both money and time. Sometimes, you can even bypass those less valuable introductory classes altogether. And so, your overall transcript will look better the more you do well in more advanced classes (>300 level).

Otherwise, maybe if you take at least one challenging class in either of the two possible majors, it will give you enough of a sense to begin to rule one out. Or start to more seriously consider a different one altogether.

But, like I said, you have plenty of time to do that. What you do not have as much time or latitude with is to get-it-right coming out of your first semester with a solid 12-15 credits, above 3.0 or so. That's really what's more important, straight away.

That's a good thing, if that's still early in the overall Summer Orientation schedule. You want to go to the earliest possible Summer Orientation that you can get into. Particularly if you're going to be attending any kind of large public university (>5,000 undergraduates), it's best to go through the Summer Orientation as soon as you can. Ahead of as many of your classmates as you can.

To begin with, because the later you get through the Summer Advisement, the later you will end up actually registering. And the harder it will be to get into certain classes. I'm sure, some space will be held for groups of students who come in latter in the summer; but it won't be any easier than it is for the kids who start off earlier. Then, as I'm sure you've already considered, once you have your classes picked and been fully enrolled into them, you stand a pretty good chance to get a hold of the reading list for at least one or maybe two of them. In which case, you can get a significant jump on your reading. Or figuring out where to get better deals on different books from different places ((online, local and campus libraries, used-book exchanges, ect...). You can save yourself a lot of time & money this way and these little advantages here and there will tend to snowball over the course of your entire program.

Bacon.
I made a post here about my major situation: http://www.dimensionsmagazine.com/fo...d.php?t=119231

Yep, June 17 is the earliest Orientation, also the one my BBW BFF is going to, I actually didn't even know they were registering ppl for Orientation till she messaged me and said we need to go together.

Oh, BACON, of course! That is weird, now that I think of it.
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