View Single Post
Old 11-28-2017, 01:00 PM   #26
loopytheone
Administrator
 
loopytheone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Robinhoodland
Posts: 3,560
loopytheone has ascended what used to be the highest level.loopytheone has ascended what used to be the highest level.loopytheone has ascended what used to be the highest level.loopytheone has ascended what used to be the highest level.loopytheone has ascended what used to be the highest level.loopytheone has ascended what used to be the highest level.loopytheone has ascended what used to be the highest level.loopytheone has ascended what used to be the highest level.loopytheone has ascended what used to be the highest level.loopytheone has ascended what used to be the highest level.loopytheone has ascended what used to be the highest level.
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by agouderia View Post
It is the element of getting off on and thus exploiting the vulnerability and insecurity caused by a lifetime of weight shaming.

Because deriving pleasure from someone else's suffering is not a positive trait - and a bad foundation for a relationship. Not least because it skewes the balance within the relationship: The partner feasting on the other's weakness will always have the upper hand, hold more power of the vulnerable other and smother the chance of overcoming the weakness.
I interpreted the idea of 'vulnerability' quite differently in the previous post. I took it to mean a person who easily gains weight, as in, is vulnerable to weight gain rather than being vulnerable as a person because of past experiences.

I derive pleasure from somebody being 'vulnerable' to weight gain; I like watching people gain weight. But I definitely don't get pleasure from a person feeling vulnerable/insecure. I suppose that works fine for me because I'm only interested in relationships with people that don't see gaining weight as a weakness.

On another tangent, the thoughts about whether or not people are more likely to enjoy being fat depending on their weight as a child is an interesting one. Thinking of the overweight people I know closely, the trend seems to be the opposite of the one most people are describing. Most of the people I know who grew up fat have ended up 'owning' it and being unashamed and confident, whereas the ones who were skinny as kids are constantly trying to go on crash diets to get back to where they were. I think it really does depend on the individual person more than anything.
loopytheone is offline   Reply With Quote