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Old 12-31-2017, 03:42 AM   #34
TwoSwords
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waldo View Post
The anecdotal evidence for those in the extreme supersized weight range is pretty overwhelming. And as far as quality of life, it is hard for any rational person to argue that being ‘super-sized’ doesn't have a major effect.
Anecdotal evidence is a funny thing, because, you see, people only really report the cases where something bad happens. In the same way that you rarely read the newspaper headline "Good, hardworking people do their jobs," so you rarely hear about the instances where weight did not strongly effect health, and people were happy together.

Quote:
Originally Posted by waldo View Post
I certainly agree about the chasm between correlation and causation regarding fatness and health outcomes. There are so many other confounding factors that may be involved in the health of fat people. One of the more important ones is level of physical activity that tends to go down as weight goes up. I recall a study that was released a few years back where they showed moderately overweight people who exercised regularly had statistically better health outcomes than thin people who never worked out.
There have been a few studies like this, all of them turning up comparable results. Regular physical activity is most definitely good for you, so long as you don't overdo it, and get some kind of athletics-related injury or something.

Quote:
Originally Posted by waldo View Post
A potential flaw there might have been using BMI only to categorize the people and so you could have some high BMI/'normal' body fat (muscle-bound) people making that group seem 'healthier'. I also think the damage done by yo-yo dieting needs to be considered – and again I believe at least one study showed people who had a more stable high weight tended to be better off than those who had large fluctuations over the years.
It's also been shown that those who lose large amounts of weight over a relatively-short time are actually in an even higher risk category than the obese, for whatever that's worth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by waldo View Post
Fat people also are more likely to be stressed due to discrimination, and we know that constant stress/anxiety is bad for your long-term health.
From what I've seen, the following factors have been shown to be bad for people, in terms of being responsible for health issues usually associated with obesity (with the first on this list being the ones that have the most proof behind them.)

Trans fats (Obviously)
Lack of exercise
Excessive intake of refined sugars
Yo-yo dieting
High-Fructose Corn Syrup
Stress
Lack of Sleep
Not enough intake of healthy fats

Quote:
Originally Posted by waldo View Post
As far as the ‘FA guilt’, for me it is seeing numerous women who had done BBW modelling or porn and who I had lusted over now dying in their 40s and 50s. But you are right that we don’t consciously choose to find these SSBBW attractive and we have no direct effect on their lives. I guess it is only when it is your own significant other and potentially weight-related health issues that we really need to ‘check ourselves’.
While it's true that I had no direct effect on the life of any BBW Model (that I'm aware of,) let's suppose, for a moment, that I had; that I'd been spending time with one of them to talk about our mutual feelings and developed a relationship. Now, many things might result from this. She might learn to hate the attention because I like the way she looks, and become more stressed, and even more stressed when I tell her that I don't want to stress her out. She might feel pleased and relieved over having someone finally tell her that she's good, beautiful and wanted in their lives; desired and not merely tolerated. Who knows? In the end, so long as I don't forget about her wellbeing in all this, my role in the relationship being an attempt to help her make peace with herself, I am not to be blamed for what follows from that. I'm not a feeder, and I'm not going to insist on her eating truckloads of sweets all the time, or doing other things I know are bad for her. I just think she's pretty, and I want to be able to appreciate that, and, like her, to be told that I'm good, wanted and beautiful, for all that. As I see it, there's nothing there to feel guilty about in the only kind of relationship I could deal with.

Quote:
Originally Posted by waldo View Post
Seems that issue about fat people being unhealthy and costing the health care system more is one that gets trotted out more and more. But if fat people are also not living as long and not suffering the debilitating diseases of old age like Alzheimers as frequently, I can see it balancing out. One of the problems we have is the growing number of elderly which is straining the Medicare and SS pension programs. So you could argue that fat people are helping to partially mitigate that issue by having shorter average lifespans. Of course when it is your own loved one’s life (or your own), no one is going to think that way.
It's true. Nobody thinks of their own lifespan or the lifespan of their loved ones as a mere economic factor, though I once didn't have much appreciation of a long life for myself. It's hard to desire another 50-60 years when you're feeling miserable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by waldo View Post
It seems this perception of fat people (even a little bit fat) automatically being unhealthy is absolutely the biggest hurdle in the current lack of traction for fat acceptance. So I think it really does not derail this thread to address the issue. Maybe one of the things that hurt fat acceptance back when it was on the verge of really taking hold in the ‘80s/’90s was a tendency of the ‘movement’ to be too dismissive of the health implications of obesity.
I feel the so-called health "implications" should be addressed and disproven, or at least shown to be foundationless, rather than being merely dismissed, so yes; in general I agree.
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