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Old 10-22-2007, 04:07 PM   #37
CrankySpice
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Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Maine
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Default Duxelles

1 lb. assorted mushrooms, cleaned, stemmed, and very finely chopped (I chop them in my food processor, saves a ton of time)

1/4 cup very finely minced shallots or onions

4 tablespoons butter

2 tablespoons sherry or wine

Cheesecloth

First, a note about mushrooms: most of you probably already know this, but never wash mushrooms in water: they absorb it like a sponge. To clean mushrooms, either use a soft brush or towel to gently wipe dirt off of them.

Melt the butter over medium heat, and add the shallots. cook for just a few minutes, until soft and translucent.

This step is optional, but it saves a lot of time: drape the cheesecloth over a bowl, and pour your chopped mushrooms into it. pick up the ends of the cheesecloth and twist them together, to form a ball of chopped mushroom. Squeeze the mushroom ball tightly to extract the juice into the bowl. Squeeze as much of the juice out as you can. Pour the mushroom juice from the bowl into the hot pan of shallots; let most of the liquid evaporate, and then add the chopped mushroom to the pan. (you can skip the juicing part and just add the mushrooms to the pan directly, but it will take a LOT longer to cook them down in that case) mix well with the butter, and spread it out in a thin layer over the pan, stirring occasionally, until they look like this:

prep1.jpg

Duxelles are a component of Beef Wellington, for which Fuzzy has requested a recipe (the Wellington, not the duxelles, but you can't have one without the other). However, it is a very rich and flavorful seasoning you can also add to sauces, soups, and stews. It freezes beautifully, and I either spread it about 1/4 inch thick on saran wrap on a cookie sheet, freeze, and break into chunks, or I freeze it in ice cube trays and store in a ziplock bag. then you can just grab a couple of cubes or chunks and toss them in whatever you are cooking for a really nice, deep mushroom flavor.

Beef Wellington recipe to be posted tomorrow....
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