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Old 10-23-2008, 06:56 PM   #51
TraciJo67
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Originally Posted by vardon_grip View Post
This recipe isn't the same as you describe, but I had this soup in the US Senate dining hall and can attest that it is pretty darn good.

(My tweaks follow the recipe)

This is from the US Senate page:

Bean soup is on the menu in the Senate's restaurant every day. There are several stories about the origin of that mandate, but none has been corroborated.
According to one story, the Senate’s bean soup tradition began early in the 20th-century at the request of Senator Fred Dubois of Idaho. Another story attributes the request to Senator Knute Nelson of Minnesota, who expressed his fondness for the soup in 1903.


The Famous Senate Restaurant Bean Soup Recipe
2 pounds dried navy beans
four quarts hot water
1 1/2 pounds smoked ham hocks
1 onion, chopped
2 tablespoons butter
salt and pepper to taste
Wash the navy beans and run hot water through them until they are slightly whitened. Place beans into pot with hot water. Add ham hocks and simmer approximately three hours in a covered pot, stirring occasionally. Remove ham hocks and set aside to cool. Dice meat and return to soup. Lightly brown the onion in butter. Add to soup. Before serving, bring to a boil and season with salt and pepper. Serves 8.


(Tweaks)
I would make this in a crock pot because you can place all the ingredients in at one time and then go to bed or work or whatever for 6-8 hours. The beans will be very soft and some will have broken to add their starch to the soup and thicken it. (You can always mash a couple of cups of beans and return to pot to thicken even more if you like)

If you like your beans a little more firm-stovetop would be the way to go.

Start with 3 1/2 quarts of water with 1/2 quart in reserve if you like your soup a little thicker


I would use the meatiest smoked ham hocks or ham shanks you can find. Some hocks have no meat at all (I prefer shanks due to their larger meat yield)

It sounds like your father may have used a chopped up slab of salt pork-I have used salt pork in recipes before, but VERY sparingly because it leeches out a lot of salt.

I would use a very large onion or 2 medium sized onions in recipe. Diced very fine.

Add 3-celery stalks chopped fine
Add 1-carrot grated fine
Saute onion, celery and carrot in butter until golden brown.

You can add 2 medium sized potatos diced if you like (More water may be needed if you add potatoes)

Add 1 T of fresh chopped parsely or 2 T of dried parsely

Recipe says salt and pepper to taste; I would also add a small amount of white pepper. It adds a little zip to soup.

Wow .... this sounds really yummy. I'll add my own tweak in the form of potatoes, and dump it all in my crock-pot, as you suggested. Thanks so much for the recipe!
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Old 10-23-2008, 11:01 PM   #52
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Default Re: Senate Bean Soup

Ditto. I had the same thought when I read your post, TraciJo.

And ditto the same thought with a big slab of unsalted, uncured pork fat.. kinda like bacon before its been smoked.
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Old 10-25-2008, 08:08 AM   #53
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I was at the supermarket the other day and wistfully perused the fresh produce aisles. I want very much to cook more often and make healthier meals with fresh veggies, but being single and cooking for one is a problem. I end up tossing out half of what I buy because I don't get to it in time or because you have to buy so much of one item.

Perhaps more soup is the answer, but even then I am eating soup everyday and still can't finish it before I think it's no longer safe to eat!

Some of you have mentioned freezing leftovers. I need some tips:
What type of container do you use to store/freeze your leftovers? I'm always getting freezer burn it seems.
How many days after being in the refrigerator can you then freeze the remaining soup?
Is there any soup that does not freeze well? Any that especially do?
What's the best/safest way to reheat?

Thanks
Mishe
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Old 10-25-2008, 05:16 PM   #54
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Default Tips for storing/freezing soup

Don't put hot or warm soup directly into the fridge/freezer. Let it cool first. You can carefully place the sauce pan or bowl into a another bowl filled with ice water, or a sink. Once its cool, put it into the fridge first to chill, skim off any fat that solidified on top, and then freeze, if you want.

Its easier to split up a pot of soup into individual single serving containers once the soup is chilled, they'll freeze faster, and it'll be more convienent. I like those square plastic throwaway containers (Glad) that can be sealed tight to help prevent spills, and will keep your freezer from smelling like a deli.

Remember to leave space in the container so when the contents expand it won't rupture. Frozen soup usually has a shelf life of 2 to 3 months. Remember to thaw it the fridge first, before re-heating in the nuker (microwave).
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Old 10-25-2008, 05:26 PM   #55
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Default Caldo de queso

In a large saucepan, warm 2 tablespoons vegetable oil over medium heat. Saute 1 large onion, chopped with 1 grated carrot and cook until soft. Add 1 pound of red potatoes, peeled and chunked; 6 cups of chicken stock, a teaspoon marjoram, a teaspoon rosemary, 1 or 2 bay leaves, and 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, and simmer 10 to 12 minutes, until the potatoes are tender. Stir in 1/2 cup chopped roasted green chilis (Anaheim), 2 small tomatoes, crushed; 1/2 cup half-n-half; and simmer over low heat for 10 minutes. Before serving, stir in a 3/4 pound of shredded monterey jack, muenster, or mild cheddar cheese.
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Old 10-25-2008, 08:29 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by SuperMishe View Post
I was at the supermarket the other day and wistfully perused the fresh produce aisles. I want very much to cook more often and make healthier meals with fresh veggies, but being single and cooking for one is a problem. I end up tossing out half of what I buy because I don't get to it in time or because you have to buy so much of one item.

Perhaps more soup is the answer, but even then I am eating soup everyday and still can't finish it before I think it's no longer safe to eat!

Some of you have mentioned freezing leftovers. I need some tips:
What type of container do you use to store/freeze your leftovers? I'm always getting freezer burn it seems.
How many days after being in the refrigerator can you then freeze the remaining soup?
Is there any soup that does not freeze well? Any that especially do?
What's the best/safest way to reheat?

Thanks
Mishe
I am single, and I make soup all the time. I love being able to open the freezer and just pull out a container of whatever soup I have a taste for. I also give a LOT of it away to friends and family, my dad loves my soups.

I freeze my soups immediately after I make them. Don't let soup sit in the fridge more than one or two days. Broth is an amazingly good bacterial growth medium. In fact, chicken broth is used to grow bacterial cultures all the time. I use any containers handy, doesn't matter what. Once the soup is quite cool, you can just ladle it into ziplock bags and store them upright til frozen, then you can just stack them up. I slice the bags open and put the frozen soup in a big corningware and nuke it til boiling in the microwave. I don't thaw it first, just nuke it to the boiling point. ALWAYS bring re-heated soup to a full boil before serving. I can't stress this enough ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS bring it to a boil.

The soups I find hardest to freeze are creamy soups or anything with milk in it. If a recipe calls for milk, I make the soup up to that point, then freeze without the milk. When I reheat it, I finish the recipe by adding the milk. Same goes for soups with cheese. Make the soup up to the point you would add the cheese, then freeze. Add the cheese when you reheat. The cheese will break if you freeze it and the soup will be all gross looking. Also, I don't add any noodles or pasta directly to my soup. I make all pasta and noodles separately, and add to the serving bowl. If you put the pasta in the soup, the pasta will be all mushy and gross when you reheat the soup.
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Old 10-26-2008, 08:33 PM   #57
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I made this for the first time a couple weeks ago and everyone loved it. I made a super huge pot and it was gone within days. I kinda just combined info from the internet, advice from my friends mom, and how one of my favorite local restaurants makes it to create my own recipe.

Caldo de camerones

Salt to taste
1 whole onion
5 cloves of garlic
1 small can of Chipotle peppers in adobo sauce

4 carrots
2 ears of corn, each cut into 3 pieces
4 big potatoes
3 chayote
1 half head of cabbage
1 bunch of green onion
1 ½ lbs of shrimp (peeled and deveined)

Avocado
1 bunch of Cilantro
Lime
Corn tortillas

I added the first set of items: salt, onion, garlic, and chipotle to water immediately and removed it before serving the soup. The veggies are added one by one, carefully so nothing gets over cooked, the shrimp and green onion last. When the soup is served add cilantro, avocado, and a quarter or half of lime and serve with warm tortillas.
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Old 10-27-2008, 09:41 AM   #58
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Mishe, I live alone too and have the same problem of buying food and tossing 1/4 of it cause I didn't eat or use it in time, so I make soup all the time and freeze single bowlfuls in those rectangular Glad containers previously mentioned. I've kept it in the freezer far beyond a month or two, and while freezer burn isn't partcularly attractive, it hasn't hurt the soup's flava in the least. I echo the poster who said milk/cream or cheese soups don't freeze well. I tried freezing cream of tomato rice soup once with very unappetizing results. But I make corn chowder quite often and it's held up just fine in the fridge for 6 or 7 days.

Anyway, yesterday being a blustery, rainy fall day made it the perfect time to make another vat of soup. I rarely measure anything, just chop it and toss it into the pot. This time around my main ingredient was a cooked rotissierie turkey breast from the grocery store.

1. I sauteed some onions, celery, 4 or 5 whole garlic cloves (keep count, it's important later) and carrot in a little olive oil, adding some salt, garlic powder, poultry seasoning, a touch of cumin and cayenne pepper.
2. I poured in a can or two of chicken broth and brought everything to the boil, then tossed in a half-cup or so of barley, cut the heat to medium and set the timer for 15 minutes.
3. I chopped up the turkey and threw that in the pot when the timer went off, added a few more cans of chicken broth, some more garlic powder, poultry seasoning and black pepper, and a handful of rinsed lentils, brought everything back to the boil, cut the heat to low/simmer and let it go for somewhere around an hour.
4. I fished out the garlic cloves and mooshed them with the back of the spoon and threw it right back into the soup, tasted everything for seasoning and adjusted the salt/pepper deal, and voila soup was done. After it cooled down I ladled it into my plastic bowls and popped them into the freezer, all ready to grab and go for work.

(I know there are several schools of thought on the risks/dangers of plastic containers, but for a good soup I'm willing to take my chances. Gotta die of something.)

I eat soup year-round, but this time of year is really when it's at it's warm, tasty, comforting best. I couldn't live without soup.
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Old 10-27-2008, 09:48 AM   #59
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Hi Supermishe,

I cook for one or two myself.....and I'm a huge soup fan. I find it's the easiest way to get in lots of veggies, and cuts down on kitchen time. I use the Glad / zip lock reusable containers myself for freezing.

I'll agree with Pamelalois on not freezing cream or cheese soups. I disagree about the noodles though...I do it all the time, and to me, it's fine. They're softer than when originally cooked, but since I tend to use small or short pasta shapes, it doesn't really matter (and still tastes light years better than canned noodles soups). Since one of the reasons I do soup is the convenience factor....having to do the noodles separately doesn't work for me. All of which is to say, it's up to you and your own personal tastes and needs. Try it, and decide for yourself! I think Pamila mentioned using egg noodles in her soup, and I use regular pasta, so that might make a difference.
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Old 10-27-2008, 07:19 PM   #60
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Thanks for the responses guys - i'm going to try "souping" next week.

By the way - who does all the dishes??... LOL!
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Old 10-28-2008, 12:42 PM   #61
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Originally Posted by TraciJo67 View Post
I've tried the www.thepioneerwomancooks.com recipe for navy bean soup & cornbread ... it looks soooo yummy, but for some reason, I just cannot get it right, no matter how much I tweak it. It ends up weak & watery or too salty or the beans are too mushy or ... well, you get the point. I am wondering if it's because I refuse to make it without adding the potato. The starch probably absorbs too much of the flavor ... but to me, bean soup wouldn't be bean soup without my yummy starchy spuds.

BTW ... the website above ... recipe for olive cheese bread ....
Oh my God. I've spent the last hour at that website, browsing and printing recipes. Holy Mother of All Delicious Things I am LOVING this website.

I'm making the chicken rice soup for dinner tonight and have plans to make most of what I'm finding at her site.
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Old 10-28-2008, 06:08 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by lypeaches View Post
I think Pamila mentioned using egg noodles in her soup, and I use regular pasta, so that might make a difference.
I have used both egg noodles and pasta, depending on the soup and the taste I am trying to achieve. Egg noodles for me are almost compulsory in Chicken Noodle Soup, while I have to use pasta (usually conchiglie) in Pasta E Fagioli. For other soups, I guess it just depends on what I have in the cabinet. I made beef vegetable soup last week and had it both with farfalle one day, and egg noodles another. Tasted just as good both times. Sometimes I don't use noodles at all, but barley or rice. Again, it just depends on what I have a taste for or what's in the cabinet.
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Old 10-28-2008, 06:09 PM   #63
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Originally Posted by SuperMishe View Post
Thanks for the responses guys - i'm going to try "souping" next week.

By the way - who does all the dishes??... LOL!
The sucky part about loving to cook and living alone is that I have to do all the dishes
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Old 10-28-2008, 06:55 PM   #64
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Originally Posted by Miss Vickie View Post
Oh my God. I've spent the last hour at that website, browsing and printing recipes. Holy Mother of All Delicious Things I am LOVING this website.

I'm making the chicken rice soup for dinner tonight and have plans to make most of what I'm finding at her site.
Be on the lookout for giveaways etc...Oh..and she can be really hilarious. I've been visiting her site for a least a year.

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Old 10-28-2008, 06:58 PM   #65
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I've been getting quite a few of my recipes from foodgawker.com just click on the pic and you can get the recipe...just try not to lick your screen when looking at the pics
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Old 10-28-2008, 07:02 PM   #66
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Hmmmm...just had some of my Mexican zucchini soup. It was pretty tasty..but...for fucks sake...I always amazed at how much I have to tweak recipes! I swear... so many people are eating bland food.
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Old 10-29-2008, 08:08 AM   #67
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Just made this soup last night, and it is DELICIOUS!!! I think you could also take it in different directions by adding different seasonings, herbs. But it totally rocked as is.


Butternut Squash & Coconut Milk Soup

Enough olive oil or butter for sautéing onion
1 onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 butternut squash, roasted and cut into cubes
1 box of chicken stock (1 qt?)
1 can of coconut milk
Salt and Pepper

Saute the onion over medium heat till translucent. Add garlic, cook another minute or so. Add squash and chicken stock. Bring to a gentle boil and cook until the squash is very soft. At this point puree the soup with either an immersion blender or a blender. Return to stove over low heat, add the coconut milk. Season to taste.

** to roast the butternut squash, simply take your whole butternut squash and prick several holes in the skin with a fork. Place it in a baking dish with an inch or two of water. Bake at 450 for 45 minutes. Once the squash has cooled, you can easily skin, seed and cube it.
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Old 10-29-2008, 08:16 AM   #68
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PamelaLois,

Oh queen of stocks.....do you have a recipe for beef barley soup, making your own beef stock?

Would love it if you do!

I love the fact that everyone makes soups differently...it's why I like cooking, you can make things exactly the way YOU like it.
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Old 10-29-2008, 08:24 AM   #69
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Originally Posted by lypeaches View Post
Just made this soup last night, and it is DELICIOUS!!! I think you could also take it in different directions by adding different seasonings, herbs. But it totally rocked as is.


Butternut Squash & Coconut Milk Soup

Enough olive oil or butter for sautéing onion
1 onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 butternut squash, roasted and cut into cubes
1 box of chicken stock (1 qt?)
1 can of coconut milk
Salt and Pepper

Saute the onion over medium heat till translucent. Add garlic, cook another minute or so. Add squash and chicken stock. Bring to a gentle boil and cook until the squash is very soft. At this point puree the soup with either an immersion blender or a blender. Return to stove over low heat, add the coconut milk. Season to taste.

** to roast the butternut squash, simply take your whole butternut squash and prick several holes in the skin with a fork. Place it in a baking dish with an inch or two of water. Bake at 450 for 45 minutes. Once the squash has cooled, you can easily skin, seed and cube it.

Sounds DELICIOUS. I think I'll try this recipe on the weekend. My own tweak will be to add some curry powder and call it CURRIED BUTTERNUT SQUASH & COCONUT MILK SOUP. This is so that my husband will be fooled into eating it
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Old 10-29-2008, 05:37 PM   #70
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[quote=lypeaches;972527]PamelaLois,
Oh queen of stocks.....do you have a recipe for beef barley soup, making your own beef stock?
quote]

I do have a recipe for beef stock, it takes all day, but it tastes like heaven! I have added two soup recipes I make with this stock. One is the beef barley you asked for, the other is French Onion.
* please notice, I do not add salt. I don't cook with salt, but if you do, please go right ahead. If I were to use salt, I would not add it to the stock, but to whatever dish I made with the stock in order to avoid it being too salty.

Beef Stock:

10 lbs meaty beef soup bones, hip and thigh bones work best
4-5 carrots, cut in half, can leave the leafy bits on if you want
4-5 stalks celery with the leafy bits
2-3 onions cut in half peels still on
5-7 whole cloves garlic
10-20 whole peppercorns
2-3 bay leaves
water to cover.

Place bones in a large roasting pan and roast at 325* for 1 hour, or until bones are golden brown.

Place roasted bones in a large stock pot, I use a 20qt pot, scrape all the goodies from the bottom of the roasting pan into the stock pot. Lots of flavor in those roasted bits of goodness. Add the rinsed carrots, celery, onions, garlic, peppercorn, bay leaves and water. Leave all the peels and skins on the veggies, they add a lot of taste, and you are going to throw it all away anyhow. Bring to a rolling boil, turn down heat, and simmer for 12 hours. You may have to add water a few times during the cooking process to keep the pot full. I know that's a long time, but it makes a difference in the flavor. You can get away with 5 or 6 hours, but it doesn't taste the same, and doesn't bring out as much gelatin.

Strain out all the stuff, you can pick the meat off the bones, if you want. It is very tender at this point, and falls apart. The neighborhood dogs will be your best friend if you take these big bones around to friends. My neighbor's dog thinks I am the "Bone and Guts Fairy". Cool the stock as much as possible, and place the pot into the refrigerator overnight. The fat will harden and you can lift it off the stock in the morning. Don't be surprised if the stock has gelled, that shows you made it right. I didn't know that the first time I made it, and threw the whole 12 quarts away because I thought it was ruined.

Once you have removed the fat, you can either freeze the stock, or use it for soup. One thing I do all the time with stock is freeze it in ice cube trays. Then when I need a little bit of stock to flavor something, I can grab a cube or two and throw them into whatever I am making. Great in stir fries or sauces.

Beef Barley Vegetable Soup:

This recipe will make a LOT of soup, so have some containers to freeze the leftovers.

1 lb beef stew meat or beef roast cut into small cubes
3-4 carrots, sliced
2-3 onions diced
3-4 stalks celery, diced
2-3 leeks, well cleaned and sliced
1/2 lb mushrooms, sliced
3-4 cloves garlic, diced or crushed
2-3 turnips, diced
3-4 parsnips, sliced
5-6 potatoes, cut in chunks
1 little box chopped frozen spinach, or same amout fresh, well cleaned
1 small bag frozen peas
1 small bag frozen corn
1 small bag frozen cauliflower/broccoli mix
1 large can crushed tomatoes
beef stock
1 box quick barley
handful of dried parsley
10-20 peppercorns
2 bay leaves

The choice of veggies is totally up to you. These are the ones I use, my mother uses different ones. She likes zucchini and green beans in hers. It is totally up to you, feel free to change it in any way, I am sure it will be fantastic.

Into a large stockpot, and I mean LARGE, I use the 20 qt one, put all the veggies except the frozen ones and the crushed tomato. Add the parsley, bay leaves and peppercorns. Add the stock til the pot is pretty full. Bring to a rolling boil, turn down heat, add the crushed tomato, and simmer til the veggies are cooked. Check a potato, when it is done, the rest of them should be too. Add the frozen veggies and bring back to a boil. Turn down the heat and simmer for 5-10 minutes to meld the flavors. Meanwhile, in a separate pan, prepare the barley according to the box directions, using beef stock instead of water. Spoon the barley into a bowl and add the soup. Garnish with some fresh parmesan cheese.

I don't make the barley in the soup, as the barley takes up a lot of liquid. It might take too much liquid out of the soup and it could burn.

Always freeze the leftover soup immediately, or refrigerate and use within 2 days. When reheating soup, ALWAYS bring to a full boil before serving.

French Onion Soup:

7-8 large Vidalia or Sweet onions chopped into large pieces
1 stick butter
beef stock
1 tblspoon flour
10-20 peppercorns
1-2 bay leaves
french bread
swiss and mozarella cheese, grated and mixed together.

In a medium large stock pot, I use a 12 qt pot, melt the butter, add the onions and cook covered over low heat til the onions are transparent and soft. This will take a long time. Sprinkle with the flour and cook for a couple minutes til all the flour is taken up. Add the beef stock, bay leaves and peppercorns. Bring to a rolling boil then reduce heat and simmer for 45 minutes. Ladle into an ovenproof bowl, top with a thick slice of french bread and a big handful of mixed shredded cheese. Place under the broiler til the cheese is browned and bubbly. You can also nuke the soup, it just won't be brown, tastes just as good. Enjoy.
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Old 10-29-2008, 05:40 PM   #71
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Originally Posted by TraciJo67 View Post
Sounds DELICIOUS. I think I'll try this recipe on the weekend. My own tweak will be to add some curry powder and call it CURRIED BUTTERNUT SQUASH & COCONUT MILK SOUP. This is so that my husband will be fooled into eating it
Ooooh, this sounds so good! I am going to try it this weekend!

Does anyone have a good recipe for split pea soup? I had some that I absolutely loved, it had big chunks of carrot and onion in it. The maker refused to give up the recipe and as I have never made it before, I am afraid to experiment with the split peas.
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Old 10-30-2008, 07:00 AM   #72
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I have a funny to add to the soup conversation. I was in one of my doctor's office this week and reading an issue of People Magazaine, they had an article about Keira Knightley. Ms Knightley as you know has continually been losing weight in motion picture after motion picture and now looks like a 13 year old teenage boy. (No breasts, no curves, I doubt if she has periods anymore.)

They asked her what her favorite food was and she said "Roast chicken". I'm thinking, this girl probably only inhales the smell of roast chicken, I doubt if she actually eats it.

And then she gives the interviewer a recipie, "I love to take roast chicken bones and cook them in hot water. It makes a wonderful broth." So, ladies there you have it, the key to her weight loss diet - soup made from the bones of roast chicken and hot water. Yum, Yum.
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Old 10-30-2008, 07:44 AM   #73
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lol...ok....so "essence" of roast chicken!! Silly me, and here I thought that I was supposed to eat the CHICKEN.

Anyhoo....PamelaLois, many thanks for your recipe/instructions. Anyone who has a 20 quart stock pot is definitely a stock goddess in my opinion!! Unfortunately, given my limited space resources, I have a lowly 6 qt. pot, so I'll have to scale down. Somewhere in my hazy memory, I think I made my stock last time with oxtails....any opinion on that vs. bones?

TraciJo, curry was definitely one of the directions I was thinking of for that butternut squash soup. Please report back with the results!

Here's how I make Split Pea Soup. I think it's pretty traditional. Please note this is for a small pot of soup. Pamela will probably need to at least quadruple it!!!

Split Pea Soup

Saute an onion and 2 cloves garlic with a dried bay leaf in olive oil till transulcent.

Add to pot and cook a few minutes:
2 carrots, finely chopped
2 celery stalks (with leaves if possible) finely chopped
1 potato, finely diced (I basicly add this for thickening...not for chunks)
a couple sprigs of fresh thyme

Add a bag of rinsed split peas
1 qt. broth (I've used plain water, vegetable, chicken, and ham broth) Ham is best I think, but they all work just fine.)

Oops, almost forgot, add in a cup or so (whatever you like) of cubed or shredded ham.

Simmer for 20 minutes or so, till peas are cooked.

Season with salt & pepper. Possibly add water to get your desired consistency.

Please note: leftovers for this soup are very thick, almost like mashed potatoes. You always have to thin out leftovers.
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Old 10-30-2008, 04:27 PM   #74
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Originally Posted by lypeaches View Post
lol...ok....so "essence" of roast chicken!! Silly me, and here I thought that I was supposed to eat the CHICKEN.

Anyhoo....PamelaLois, many thanks for your recipe/instructions. Anyone who has a 20 quart stock pot is definitely a stock goddess in my opinion!! Unfortunately, given my limited space resources, I have a lowly 6 qt. pot, so I'll have to scale down. Somewhere in my hazy memory, I think I made my stock last time with oxtails....any opinion on that vs. bones?

TraciJo, curry was definitely one of the directions I was thinking of for that butternut squash soup. Please report back with the results!

Here's how I make Split Pea Soup. I think it's pretty traditional. Please note this is for a small pot of soup. Pamela will probably need to at least quadruple it!!!

Split Pea Soup

Saute an onion and 2 cloves garlic with a dried bay leaf in olive oil till transulcent.

Add to pot and cook a few minutes:
2 carrots, finely chopped
2 celery stalks (with leaves if possible) finely chopped
1 potato, finely diced (I basicly add this for thickening...not for chunks)
a couple sprigs of fresh thyme

Add a bag of rinsed split peas
1 qt. broth (I've used plain water, vegetable, chicken, and ham broth) Ham is best I think, but they all work just fine.)

Oops, almost forgot, add in a cup or so (whatever you like) of cubed or shredded ham.

Simmer for 20 minutes or so, till peas are cooked.

Season with salt & pepper. Possibly add water to get your desired consistency.

Please note: leftovers for this soup are very thick, almost like mashed potatoes. You always have to thin out leftovers.
This sounds exactly like the soup I had. I am going to try this next, after the squash soup.

Anyhoo.........Oxtails ROCK in soup. I love them, but don't use them for the stock, you will lose all the lovely flavor of the tails cooking them for 12 hours. I would use them in some sort of crock pot soup dish where they benefit from the long slow cooking, but not the heavy simmering of stock.

For your little baby cute 6 qt stock pot, cut the recipes by a quarter. I couldn't survive with such a tiny stock pot. I would have to make stock way too often, and it is too time consuming to be making it every week. I like the big pot so I can make a ton and freeze it for later.
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Old 10-31-2008, 07:40 AM   #75
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Originally Posted by PamelaLois View Post
For your little baby cute 6 qt stock pot, cut the recipes by a quarter. I couldn't survive with such a tiny stock pot. I would have to make stock way too often, and it is too time consuming to be making it every week. I like the big pot so I can make a ton and freeze it for later.
OK...this made me giggle. It's one of the reasons I don't make stock all that often, usually resort to boxed from the grocery store, but, like I said, I just don't have a big kitchen or a big freezer, so the big stock pot doesn't really make sense for me now. Some day!!
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