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Old 03-03-2011, 04:21 PM   #1
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Default March Iron Foodee Challenge

Hello All! For me the month of March is all about two things. Blooming flowers and St. Patrick's Day. Not only am I of Irish descent, but I married my best friend on St. Patrick's Day sixteen years ago.

I would like to choose IRISH FOOD as the secret ingredient for this month. I would love to see recipes for corned beef, cabbage, potatoes, lamb stew, colcannon, soda bread and any other recipe that you enjoy for this holiday or to enjoy. So, please put on your green and share a recipe or more. Thanks!



Here are the Past Challenges!

Past Iron Foodie Challenges

2006
Dec - Oranges

2007
Jan - Cream Cheese
Feb - Soda pop
Mar - Recipes containing a can of soup
Apr - Shrimp
May - Eggs
Jun - Liquor
Jul - Pasta/couscous etc Salads
Aug - Zucchini
Sep - Quick breads / Muffins
Oct - Cheese
Nov - Cranberries
Dec - Fudge

2008
Jan - Slow Cooker Recipes
Feb - Potatoes
Mar - Garlic and Mushrooms
Apr - Chicken
May - Lemons
Jun - 30 min Hot Weather Recipes
Jul - Preserves - Jams, Chutneys, Relishes etc
Aug - Coffee
Sep - Tofu / Cottage Cheese
October - Pumpkin
November - Sweet Potatoes/Yams
December - Mint

2009
January - Soup
February - Pork
March-Mexican Food
April - Cereal
May- Berries
June-Yogurt
July - Corn
August - Asian
September - Breakfast foods
October - Nuts
November - Onions
December - Meat in Casings

2010
January - Side Salads
February - Spinach
March - Beans
April-hot sandwiches
May-Soy Sauce
June - cookies
July - Sour Cream
August - (Summer Break)
Sept - BBQ Foods.
October - Southern cuisine
November - Peanut butter
December-"Packaged Food"


2011
January - rice
February - chocolate
March - Irish food
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Old 03-04-2011, 05:16 PM   #2
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Am making Irish Stew from Joy of Cooking. Tweaking the recipe a tad since I simply cannot afford 3 pounds of lamb. 1 pound is my max. Lamb is selling for between $6 and $7 for half a pound where I live.

What you need is: A Dutch Oven (I have a small casserole dish)

Preheat your stove to 325.

Note: The original recipe says to heat the butter and add the stew meat on top of a burner and brown it. I don't want to ruin my casserole dish so I just bake everything.

Add 2 tbsp. of olive oil or butter
Add the lamb stew meat, cut into 1-inch cubes
Couple teaspoons thyme
Salt & pepper to taste

I also added 1/2 cup of red wine, a tip I learned from Julia Child's book. Pretty much all stews go better with red wine, or even a hearty beer.

Added 2 potatoes, diced (I don't peel mine as all the good vitamins are in the skin)
2 cups water
1/2 bag frozen carrots
2 stalks celery, diced (this was a tweak of mine also)
1/2 onion, chopped

The original says to cook for 2 hours, but I suspect less time will be needed with less meat. We shall see.

Last edited by EMH1701; 03-04-2011 at 05:18 PM.
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Old 03-04-2011, 06:47 PM   #3
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Update: Cooking time didn't change, apparently. 2 hours was good. I did up the temp to 350 on the second hour.
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Old 03-07-2011, 07:29 AM   #4
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This is quite a basic recipe, but tasty as hell. It was my Grandpa's favourite recipe and we had it whenever he came over to England.

Boiled bacon and cabbage

Depending on what you can buy; gammon, bacon chops, ham knuckle etc.
Stock veg - 2 carrots, 2 sticks celery, 2 leeks, 2 onions, 2 bay leaves
Finely chopped cabbage - savoy is good.
Kilo waxy potatoes, peeled and chopped into equal sizes.

Add meat to a pan and cover in water. Bring to the boil and simmer for 10 minutes. Then drain the water and re-fill with cold water. Bring slowly to boil again. Add all the stock veg (chopped roughly) with a good hit of black pepper. Simmer till cooked (gammon or ham shanks usually take about hour and a half, bacon chops less.)

When the meat is cooked, take out of the stock, allow to rest, and remove the stock veg. Cook the cabbage in the stock for a few minutes till it's almost done, remove and plunge straight into cold water to refresh. Next add the potatoes, cook thoroughly (you should be able to taste the stock in the spuds.)

While the potatoes are cooking, prep the meat, if it's gammon, just slice (don't be stingy, it's should be thick) and if it's a shank of ham, take off the bone and take the skin and most of the fat off (leave a bit on for taste) and slice.

Remove the potatoes and check the stock for seasoning, the potatoes should have drawn a lot of the salt out of the water. If it's still too salty, add more fresh water. Put the meat into a warm serving bowl with a couple of ladels of stock over the top. Warm the cabbage in the rest of the stock and serve in another bowl with the potatoes. Put all of this into the middle of a table with loads of granary bread and proper butter (salted.)

Serve with stout, but not the dreaded G word, there are some amazing beers in Ireland and Britain. Avoid the mass marketed Guinness, search out the oyster and malt stouts.
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Old 03-07-2011, 07:32 AM   #5
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Almost forgot, add butter and black pepper to the cabbage and potatoes before serving.
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Old 03-07-2011, 11:30 AM   #6
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MUSTARD CREAM SAUCE (Great for St. Patrick's Day)

Ingredients:

2 TBS. butter
2 TBS. flour
2 cups "broth" (cooking water from cooked corned beef)
1 cup heavy cream
1 TBS. prepared horseradish
2 TBS. whole grain mustard (or to taste)
2 TBS. fresh chives, minced

Directions:

1. Make the roux by melting the butter in a small sauce pan, then slowly stir in flour and cook over low heat for half a minute, stirring constantly. Do not brown.
2. Bring broth, cream, horseradish and mustard to boil in a separate medium sauce pan. Reduce heat to a simmer and slowly add the roux a little at a time until the sauce is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon.
3. Stir in chives and serve over corned beef and/or veggies.

This is a delicious way to add some additional great flavor to your cooked corned beef and corned beef, carrots and potatoes.
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Old 03-07-2011, 11:41 AM   #7
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Have you tried adding the broth to the roux instead? this should mix in easier.
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Old 03-07-2011, 03:41 PM   #8
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Have you tried adding the broth to the roux instead? this should mix in easier.
This is indeed how it would usually be to make a sauce. I did not formulate this recipe and have made it the way that it is stated and it works, so I did not change it. But yes, normally the liquid would be added to the roux instead of vice versa as in the above recipe.
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Old 03-07-2011, 10:07 PM   #9
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I make this every year at St. Patrick's Day, even though I know they didn't eat corned beef in Ireland. The corned beef tradition comes from New York City's Irish immigrants that lived near Jewish immigrants.

Boiled Dinner (Corned Beef, Cabbage and Vegetables)

2 Corned Beefs (I use the prepackaged ones, I choose 2 flat cuts of a nice size)
6 carrots, cut in half
4 leeks, white part only, cleaned but left whole
6-8 red potatoes, scrubbed and halved
1 cabbage, cored and quartered
2 onions, peeled, root end trimmed and halved.
4-5 cloves garlic, whole, skin removed
10-12 whole peppercorns
2-3 bay leaves

In a large stockpot, place the corned beef and bring to a boil, drain, replace in stockpot, fill with clean water, add the spice packets, garlic, peppercorns and bay leaves. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer 2 hours.
Add the veggies and simmer til potatoes and carrots are cooked, about 1/2 hour more. Remove the corned beef to a platter to rest for 15 minutes to firm up. Remove the veggies to a large bowl or platter. I usually discard the onions because they get mushy and gross and the leeks taste oniony. Slice the corned beef across the grain for tenderness. Serve with lots of butter for the veggies and some rye bread if you like.
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Old 03-09-2011, 01:12 AM   #10
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What form does your corned beef come in? Is it tinned or do you buy it brined from the butcher?
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Old 03-09-2011, 09:18 PM   #11
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What form does your corned beef come in? Is it tinned or do you buy it brined from the butcher?
I buy corned beef that comes uncooked in a sealed plastic package with brine in it. I usually buy the flat cut instead of the point cut because it has a little less fat and is easier to slice into uniform pieces. If I could find a decent butcher shop, I would prefer to get it fresh from them, but butcher shops are few and far between now. In the Chicago area, most people get meat from their local grocery store, and they usually don't have actual butchers, but get boxed, pre-cut meat from a distributor. There used to be a butcher shop nearby, but they closed at the end of last year, and honestly, they were anything but "good" the last few years. I wish there were more proper butchers in the area, I can't get soup bones cheap anymore. I'm pretty picky about meat and the grocery store meat is OK, fresh, clean, but usually not available in a grade higher than Select, a large proportion of it is no better than Good grade, the lowest grade fit for human consumption. Choice is hard to find, and usually expensive, and forget about getting Prime meat anywhere except a high-end steakhouse.

I know there are butcher shops in the city (Chicago) but they are in crazy neighborhoods where there's no parking or too many psychos.

I've never seen tinned corned beef, I think that would frighten me, corned beef in a can.....
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Old 03-10-2011, 06:45 AM   #12
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It's 1 thing we do have a lot round here (butchers, not psychos). Unfortunately lots of people use supermarkets now. I'd hate to see them die out. You'd normally see corned beef tinned, usually from Argentina. It's pre-cooked and only good for corned beef hash. I'm going to speak to my butcher later about brining me some, do you use top side or rump, or another cut? I use the same butcher for the deli as for home, they're pretty good at things like this. I really want to try this recipe, it's like a version of Poulet au Pot, the old French dish, except you use a whole chicken in that one. When I try it, I'll probably use the veg waste in the initial cook, to strengthen the stock.
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Old 03-10-2011, 09:47 AM   #13
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PL I can empathize about the lack of "real" butcher shop anymore. I buy my dogs large femur bones (most have virtually no meat on them) at the grocery..they are over $1.00 per pound. Sometimes I wonder if stores don't realize people like soup bones for a reason..cheap, good food!

I am really surprised that you can't find more "choice" cuts of meat there. The stores I shop at..plain ol' grocery stores sell about 90% choice cuts and 10% select. And lately when I go to Costco or Sam's Club they actually have a small selection of "prime" beef. We in Costco about a week ago (I always check out the "prime meats") and for real prime rib and/or ribeye was $12.99 a pound...I got to see my first $95.00 rib roast ..LOL
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Old 03-10-2011, 03:54 PM   #14
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PL I can empathize about the lack of "real" butcher shop anymore. I buy my dogs large femur bones (most have virtually no meat on them) at the grocery..they are over $1.00 per pound. Sometimes I wonder if stores don't realize people like soup bones for a reason..cheap, good food!

...
I am not sure if this is regional or not. Until recently I lived in a small town of about 60k and we still have butcher shops. My father would have been 82 this year and I grew up in a very, very small town and it had a butcher shop and the butcher LOVED my father. Because my father knew his cuts, knew how to pick out meat...many times for Christmas we would have a rack of lamb. So, I always grew up knowing how to pick out meat.

I am now just east of there in Columbus and butcher shops are still around. Farmer's markets too are great in the summer? Lots of small time animal processing plants sell amazing food at the ones I work/attend. I still have a cow leg bone from my old dog that the new doggies are still gnawing on 3 years later..... It might be a regional thing and Columbus is a Foodie town to boot.soooo...i am probably being no help at all. lol
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Old 03-10-2011, 03:55 PM   #15
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Am making Irish Stew from Joy of Cooking. Tweaking the recipe a tad since I simply cannot afford 3 pounds of lamb. ....
when are you fixing this again and hmm....can I come over?? hehehe
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Old 03-10-2011, 06:00 PM   #16
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when are you fixing this again and hmm....can I come over?? hehehe
If I make it again I'm going to have to use beef, as lamb is just too spendy right now. The stew should work just fine with beef, though.
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Old 03-10-2011, 09:48 PM   #17
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This is quite a basic recipe, but tasty as hell. It was my Grandpa's favourite recipe and we had it whenever he came over to England.

Boiled bacon and cabbage

Depending on what you can buy; gammon, bacon chops, ham knuckle etc.
Stock veg - 2 carrots, 2 sticks celery, 2 leeks, 2 onions, 2 bay leaves
Finely chopped cabbage - savoy is good.
Kilo waxy potatoes, peeled and chopped into equal sizes.

Add meat to a pan and cover in water. Bring to the boil and simmer for 10 minutes. Then drain the water and re-fill with cold water. Bring slowly to boil again. Add all the stock veg (chopped roughly) with a good hit of black pepper. Simmer till cooked (gammon or ham shanks usually take about hour and a half, bacon chops less.)

When the meat is cooked, take out of the stock, allow to rest, and remove the stock veg. Cook the cabbage in the stock for a few minutes till it's almost done, remove and plunge straight into cold water to refresh. Next add the potatoes, cook thoroughly (you should be able to taste the stock in the spuds.)

While the potatoes are cooking, prep the meat, if it's gammon, just slice (don't be stingy, it's should be thick) and if it's a shank of ham, take off the bone and take the skin and most of the fat off (leave a bit on for taste) and slice.

Remove the potatoes and check the stock for seasoning, the potatoes should have drawn a lot of the salt out of the water. If it's still too salty, add more fresh water. Put the meat into a warm serving bowl with a couple of ladels of stock over the top. Warm the cabbage in the rest of the stock and serve in another bowl with the potatoes. Put all of this into the middle of a table with loads of granary bread and proper butter (salted.)

Serve with stout, but not the dreaded G word, there are some amazing beers in Ireland and Britain. Avoid the mass marketed Guinness, search out the oyster and malt stouts.
I really want to try this, I love cabbage
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Old 03-11-2011, 04:28 PM   #18
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This is quite a basic recipe, but tasty as hell. It was my Grandpa's favourite recipe and we had it whenever he came over to England.

Boiled bacon and cabbage
This sounds good and fairly frugal as well.
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Old 03-11-2011, 11:09 PM   #19
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Default Irish Coddle

1 pound rashers (fatty back-bacon, can substitute with bacon)
1 pound sausage links
2 onions, sliced
2 whole garlic cloves
4 large potatoes, diced
2 carrots, peeled and diced
Salt and pepper to taste
4 cups apple cider
1 tablespoon dry parsley

Select a cast iron dutch-oven with a heavy tight fitting lid. Coddle is to be steamed, not boiled. Watch the heat, and try to prevent from a rolling boil.

Fry the rashers in a dutch-oven over medium heat, until crisp, and remove.

Reserve 1 tablespoon of the drippings. Place the sausage links into the oven with the reserved drippings. Brown the sausage 8 minutes, turning often to brown all sides. Remove the sausage and drain.

Saute the onion and garlic in the remaining drippings, about 5 minutes, until soft. Remove.

Crumble the rashers into the bottom of the dutch oven. Layer the sausage, onions, garlic, potatoes and carrots. Sprinkle salt and pepper to taste. Pour just enough of the apple cider over the mixture in the oven to just cover.

Cover and cook over medium low heat for 1 1/2 hours. Sprinkle the parsley over the soup just before serving.

Makes about 6 servings.
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Old 03-13-2011, 12:38 PM   #20
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If I make it again I'm going to have to use beef, as lamb is just too spendy right now. The stew should work just fine with beef, though.
There's a stew made in Liverpool called Scouse. Some versions use lamb and beef, the breast of lamb and shin of beef. Breast of lamb is incredibly cheap but very fatty, use third of this to 2 thirds shin, this way you get the sweet taste of lamb with th meatiness of beef.
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Old 03-13-2011, 02:01 PM   #21
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There was a good article this week in The Guardian on the wonders of stout; proof there is much more than just Guinness:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandsty...ew?INTCMP=SRCH

After a night on the black stuff, the important thing the next day is a Full Irish/Ulster Fry (depending where you are.) This is the same as a Full English Breakfast with a few alterations.

Bacon (back or streaky)
Fried eggs
Sausages (pork)
White pudding
Black pudding
Fried tomato
Sauteed potato or potato bread
Sauteed mushroom
Toast or fried bread

For authenticity, fry everything. Start with the bacon in a tiny bit of oil, on a low heat. When the fat starts to run, take out the pan and add the sausages, turn the heat up to medium and brown the sausages. Take out and put into a warm oven and return the bacon and brown. Then repeat this with all the ingredients, an item at a time, eggs last (add more oil if needed.) To speed this up, do it in a couple of pans. Serve with brown sauce, toast (with real, salted butter) and a large mug of Irish Breakfast blend tea, so strong you can stand a spoon up in it.

Then go back to the pub, it's the ultimate Irish holiday.
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Old 03-13-2011, 05:26 PM   #22
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There's a stew made in Liverpool called Scouse. Some versions use lamb and beef, the breast of lamb and shin of beef. Breast of lamb is incredibly cheap but very fatty, use third of this to 2 thirds shin, this way you get the sweet taste of lamb with th meatiness of beef.
Unfortunately grocery stores here just carry ground lamb or the lamb stew-type cuts. I will buy it if I ever see it, though.
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Old 03-14-2011, 01:43 AM   #23
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1 pound rashers (fatty back-bacon, can substitute with bacon)
1 pound sausage links
2 onions, sliced
2 whole garlic cloves
4 large potatoes, diced
2 carrots, peeled and diced
Salt and pepper to taste
4 cups apple cider
1 tablespoon dry parsley

Select a cast iron dutch-oven with a heavy tight fitting lid. Coddle is to be steamed, not boiled. Watch the heat, and try to prevent from a rolling boil.

Fry the rashers in a dutch-oven over medium heat, until crisp, and remove.

Reserve 1 tablespoon of the drippings. Place the sausage links into the oven with the reserved drippings. Brown the sausage 8 minutes, turning often to brown all sides. Remove the sausage and drain.

Saute the onion and garlic in the remaining drippings, about 5 minutes, until soft. Remove.

Crumble the rashers into the bottom of the dutch oven. Layer the sausage, onions, garlic, potatoes and carrots. Sprinkle salt and pepper to taste. Pour just enough of the apple cider over the mixture in the oven to just cover.

Cover and cook over medium low heat for 1 1/2 hours. Sprinkle the parsley over the soup just before serving.

Makes about 6 servings.
Firstly, what is a dutch oven? Is it another name for casserole?

Your version is much better than the version we knew as children. They never used to brown the meat, so everything looked grey and horrible. Never seen a version with cider before, some use stout, think I may try this and exorcise the ghosts of childhood.
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Old 03-14-2011, 02:15 PM   #24
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Firstly, what is a dutch oven? Is it another name for casserole?

Your version is much better than the version we knew as children. They never used to brown the meat, so everything looked grey and horrible. Never seen a version with cider before, some use stout, think I may try this and exorcise the ghosts of childhood.
A dutch oven is a cooking vessel, like the one below:

Attachment 91339

You can also find enameled dutch ovens. These are really popular and if you've ever watched the Food Network, you've probably seen one used.

Attachment 91340


Last edited by MisticalMisty; 05-20-2012 at 05:37 PM.
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Old 03-14-2011, 09:50 PM   #25
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Thank you Misty. Most of my dutch ovens have feet, for use with charcoal above and below the pot. But I have one like the plain cast iron above.

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