BBW comedienne(s)

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Yakatori

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Besides Melissa McCarthy & Rebel Wilson, who already have thread(S) of their own. (Or BHM comics besides the very most popular around here; Ralphie May, Chris Farley, & John Candy, I guess?)

I find this woman really interesting and appealing; I guess, because, though her style of humor is not what I normally find so funny, there's something at once both subtly and strongly appealing in how naturally and (at times) upbeat & bright she seems in delivering this otherwise (typically) very dark material. Some of you probably recognize her from a show I also find very funny, (Portlandia. Here's some of her stand-up, Kristine Levine:

[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxTxABe1q08[/ame]
 

loopytheone

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Whether or not you consider somebody her size a small BBW is kinda debatable but Sarah Millican is awesome:

[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAqLpxCe2g4[/ame]

And for the lover of the more mature BBW, Jo Brand is amazing:

[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MO4QdivCBI[/ame]
 

agouderia

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I can't help it, but I have my issues with the new hype over fat comediennes & comedy actresses.

Yes, the number of fat women in show business has increased somewhat recently - and maybe that should be a positive per se.

But it bothers me that all of this comes in the guise of the awful fat = funny and remains restricted to that narrow niche. Look at what a range of roles fat comedy actors are offered (think John Goodman or Jonah Hill), several of them Oscar material.
Now compare that to what Melissa McCarthy and Rebel Wilson get. Not to mention the insane amount of weight loss pressure thrown at them - with often the ironic consequence that if they do lose so much weight, they're no longer considered funny (when did Jennifer Hudson get her last good role?).

It's at most a very mixed blessing.
 

loopytheone

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I can't help it, but I have my issues with the new hype over fat comediennes & comedy actresses.

Yes, the number of fat women in show business has increased somewhat recently - and maybe that should be a positive per se.

But it bothers me that all of this comes in the guise of the awful fat = funny and remains restricted to that narrow niche. Look at what a range of roles fat comedy actors are offered (think John Goodman or Jonah Hill), several of them Oscar material.
Now compare that to what Melissa McCarthy and Rebel Wilson get. Not to mention the insane amount of weight loss pressure thrown at them - with often the ironic consequence that if they do lose so much weight, they're no longer considered funny (when did Jennifer Hudson get her last good role?).

It's at most a very mixed blessing.
Admittedly I have very little knowledge of pop culture etc, but I wasn't aware there was a hype for these things? I mean, I am sure there is in other countries but I don't think there is as such in the UK?

Jo Brand has been a comedian since before I was born and has always been all kinds of awesome.
 

Yakatori

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"...wasn't aware there was a hype for these things? I mean, I am sure there is in other countries but I don't think there is as such in the UK?"
Are you saying comedy's not a big deal in the UK?

"...the awful fat = funny and remains restricted to that narrow niche. Look at what a range of roles fat comedy actors are offered (think John Goodman or Jonah Hill), several of them Oscar material...compare that to what Melissa McCarthy and Rebel Wilson get."
Maybe approaching it from more a European perspective would lead you to underestimate or marginalize comedy's relevance, the real respect it commands, at the highest levels, in both the craft of acting and from an industry standpoint as well. In the US, that is.

Yes, both Goodman & Jonah Hill are funny, and (now) even respected, successful-enough, in their own rights as legitimate supporting actors, outside of their respective comedic backgrounds. However, for me, neither fairly exemplifies the type of transition I'm thinking of when I imagine how being recognized for greatness in comedy might-well open doors towards ultimately becoming a top actor; like how we've seen so many times before through those who were once recognized as (the world's?) best comics like Robin Williams or Steve Martin. Or Bill Murray or Steve Carell. Or Jim Carey?

Since they (Goodman or Jonah Hill) haven't really done anything in stand-up, which seems to be the particular format that best, most firmly, establishes anyone amongst their peers as a bona-fide comic.

Which, for me, further underscores how comedy could very well prove the difference; through which more fat women, if not fat people-in general, could gain access to the meatier roles as well as the production value and green-lighting of the projects which best support them. As in, first, conquering the box office; and then-parlaying that into some kind of leverage over the studios that allows them to take more worthwhile risks, artistically speaking
 

loopytheone

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Are you saying comedy's not a big deal in the UK?
That's not what I was saying at all. I was saying that I didn't know there a desire specifically for fat, female comedians over male or thin comedians.
 

Yakatori

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I dunno that there is or isn't. Just that, for what seems like an otherwise male-dominated field, there's a good representation of big women who're really talented and funny. Besides the ones most widely talked about.

Here's another, that I first came to hear about by her association with the very popular Amy Schumer, Bridget Everett. He act is very bawdy, beyond earthy. So, maybe best if I let people find that for themselves; and, for a change of pace, let's have a look out her somewhat out of character, beyond her typical comic persona:

[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFT4YTPODgg[/ame]

Of course, she's got a very powerful and very well-trained voice; real, serious, bona-fide musical talent; and I think this is no small part of what enables her to be as bold as she is with her comedy.
 

agouderia

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Maybe approaching it from more a European perspective would lead you to underestimate or marginalize comedy's relevance, the real respect it commands, at the highest levels, in both the craft of acting and from an industry standpoint as well. In the US, that is.

Yes, both Goodman & Jonah Hill are funny, and (now) even respected, successful-enough, in their own rights as legitimate supporting actors, outside of their respective comedic backgrounds. However, for me, neither fairly exemplifies the type of transition I'm thinking of when I imagine how being recognized for greatness in comedy might-well open doors towards ultimately becoming a top actor; like how we've seen so many times before through those who were once recognized as (the world's?) best comics like Robin Williams or Steve Martin. Or Bill Murray or Steve Carell. Or Jim Carey?

Since they (Goodman or Jonah Hill) haven't really done anything in stand-up, which seems to be the particular format that best, most firmly, establishes anyone amongst their peers as a bona-fide comic.

Which, for me, further underscores how comedy could very well prove the difference; through which more fat women, if not fat people-in general, could gain access to the meatier roles as well as the production value and green-lighting of the projects which best support them. As in, first, conquering the box office; and then-parlaying that into some kind of leverage over the studios that allows them to take more worthwhile risks, artistically speaking
Having grown up on US comedy I don't think I underestimate the importance of the comedy genre in all its variations, the unique status of stand-up comedy and how it is the door opener for careers in (high-end) movie acting or TV comedy of all walks.

But I simply don't see what you wish to describe happening IRL. Yes, there might be more BBW comediennes around now. But only very few of them, much fewer than male comediens of any size, break through to the TV or big screen. And the few who do- think McCarthy & Wilson - are much more stuck in the fat, funny rut than their male counterparts.

It might be all good and well that there are so many good BBWs in stand-up comedy now - it doesn't help much if they still are denied the opportunities to fully develop their artistic and economic (yes, money matters for a woman's independence) potential.

Oh - and please - never name Bill Murray and Jim Carey in one sentence again!
 

Yakatori

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"...I simply don't see what you wish to describe happening IRL....more BBW comediennes around now. But only very few of them, much fewer than male comediens of any size, break through to the TV or big screen. And the few who do- think McCarthy & Wilson - are much more stuck in the fat, funny rut than their male counterparts.

***​

...still are denied the opportunities to fully develop their artistic and economic (yes, money matters for a woman's independence) potential.
"
But do think that's because it's so hard, challenging, for anyone to break out as a particular season's top comedian? Or that once most people, women included, reach that echelon, the intense motivation and focus that once brought them there inevitably dissipates? Or at least begins to, particularly where it involves being creative in perhaps a totally different way.

Speaking of Jim Carey, had you heard of this new project?

[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5JLQtwlUe0[/ame]
 

Yakatori

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These girls have both worked together a lot through College Humor's website and Upright Citizen's brigade:

[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-p0nWnyIz3Q[/ame]

The second one, I don't think is very funny; it's not really my kind of humor, I don't joke about stuff like that; and, of course, it's a guy (Sebastian Conelli) playing the main part. However, I felt it was worth including just to give some better sense of their depth and range.

[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3zdcB-JY_w[/ame]
 

squeezablysoft

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I'm so glad that after having BHMs on since forever, Saturday Night Live has now had a BBW cast member for awhile. Also I don't feel quite as odd for crushing on Chris Farley and John Candy as a wee FFAlet since her first crush was "a man in a lizard suit" apparently, lol!

 

spookytwigg

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I saw somebody called Sofie Hagen who was on "Live at the BBC" which is on the UK Netflix. She is pretty excellent.
 

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