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sweet&fat

My aim is true.
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I think it depends on the type of class (lecture/seminar) and how you run your classroom. If it's a big lecture class, I stick with professor, since the students won't be getting to know me all that well. For seminars, I usually write "Professor Firstname Lastname" up on the board and let them figure out what they want to call me. It's usually a hodgepodge of all three, but each person gets to decide for him/herself what feels right.

The only hesitation I have about letting students call me by my first name instead of professor or my last name is that the first semester that I taught a seminar I let the students call me by my first name, and they walked all over me. That was also likely due to my inexperience, but I quickly learned that undergrads (especially younger ones) want you to be a professor, or at least introduce yourself as such. The title makes a big difference to them, even if you and I know that it's silly to invest so much in it. Older students are likely much more self-disciplined, especially grad students I'd imagine!

Good luck! What's your field?

My first semester of teaching is underway! So I'm now a legit professor. :cool:

I had a little period of questioning about what to have my students call me. I'm not done with my PhD yet, so I'm not a "Dr." and I didn't want to be called "Ms." because that is just stupid. And the reality is, I have a really informal, unpretentious personality, so it just didn't make sense to call me "Professor Smith" or whatever. So I'm just going with my first name.

It was a tough decision because probably about half the class is older than me (I'm not super young, but these grad students are a bit older - especially since I'm teaching a night class and most of them have jobs during the day) and I wondered whether it would be a problem if I was too informal.

But I really don't think true respect comes from a title anyway. What do you other professors on here have your students call you?
 
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LovelyLiz

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The only hesitation I have about letting students call me by my first name instead of professor or my last name is that the first semester that I taught a seminar I let the students call me by my first name, and they walked all over me. That was also likely due to my inexperience, but I quickly learned that undergrads (especially younger ones) want you to be a professor, or at least introduce yourself as such. The title makes a big difference to them, even if you and I know that it's silly to invest so much in it. Older students are likely much more self-disciplined, especially grad students I'd imagine!

Good luck! What's your field?
Thanks so much for your input! Really helpful. At this point, I'm learning a lot as I go. :)

Yeah, that "walking all over me" piece was the one I was worried about. I'm kind of a big softie anyway, but I also drive a hard line in terms of expecting these people to be responsible and get their stuff done, because they're adults and working on master's degrees. So I'm finding that balance.

I work in the field of ethics, specifically theological ethics. What about you? I think I remember you being an art history mofo? :)
 

Ned Sonntag

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I'm formulating vague plans:blush: to collaborate with one of Heather's young:) academic friends on a paper about The History Of Size Acceptance And Its Imminent Emergence Into Mainstream Culture:bow:... talk about a Five-Foot Shelf:blush:~ I've got a roomfull-size collection of Endomorphic Ephemera...!!
 

tonynyc

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For those Dimmers considering Graduate School in the coming months...


GRE to change in 2011​
By Randy Khalil
Staff Writer
Published: Wednesday, December 9th, 2009​


Princeton students leaving through FitzRandolph Gate for graduate school in the future will face a new step in the application process: a revised, longer version of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

The Educational Testing Service (ETS) announced last Friday at the annual meeting of the Council of Graduate Schools that the exam will undergo major changes before it is released in its new form in 2011, The New York Times reported last weekend.

The GRE is required for admission into many graduate programs across the nation, including most of Princeton’s degree-granting graduate programs. (The graduate program in finance also accepts the Graduate Management Admission Test as an alternative.)

David G. Payne, a vice president and chief operating officer for the Princeton-based ETS, which administers the GRE, told the Times that the new test will last three-and-a-half hours, instead of three, and have a grading scale from 130 to 170. Possible scores in the old test are multiples of 10 between 200 and 800.

The content in each of the three sections of the exam — verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning and analytical writing — will also be revised. Antonyms and analogies will be eliminated from the verbal reasoning section, and prompts for the writing section will be crafted so that graders will clearly be able to see that “answers will be responses to the question, not memorized,” Payne said.

Students will also be able to skip back and forth between exam questions. The exam, which is computer-based, currently determines succeeding questions based on the test-taker’s success with previous ones.

Olivia Kang ’09, who graduated with a degree in psychology, took the current version of the GRE in October. “I think the test would be much, much easier to skip around and go back to question,” Kang said in an e-mail to The Daily Princetonian, adding that this “would allow for a more efficient use of time.” Kang is currently working as a research assistant for two labs in Princeton’s psychology department as she applies to five Ph.D. programs in social cognition and neuroscience.

Kang questioned the validity of the exam in its current form, though. “Good GRE scores are a reflection of a good SAT math review, good vocabulary cards, and how lucky you are in the vocabulary questions you get stuck with on the test,” she said in an e-mail. “Personally I don’t really think the GREs measure readiness for grad school at all. I mean, when you think about it, how well did SAT scores correlate to readiness for Princeton?”

Kang added, though, that the revised version of the exam may address some of these concerns. “Changing the writing section will be a better measure of readiness, if indeed they can do it such that merely memorizing an essay will no longer answer the prompt,” she said.

Diana Chien ’10, an ecology and evolutionary biology major, took the GRE twice as part of the process of applying to graduate school. “I always thought that the antonym/analogy section was quite arbitrary,” she noted in an e-mail. “I’m not sure that it tested anything other than memorization abilities for most candidates, so I’m glad to see that they’re removing it.”

She added, “The GRE changes should reduce the need for time-consuming memorization. I don’t think that the updated GRE will hurt Princeton students’ graduate school admissions. The GREs are pretty much glorified SATs, and we all got through the new version of the SATs fine, after all.”

Correction:

An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that the Council of Graduate Schools announced the change at their annual meeting, in fact, it was announced by the Educational Testing Service.


Source

The Daily Princetonian - December 2009
 

TygerKitty

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My first semester of teaching is underway! So I'm now a legit professor. :cool:

I had a little period of questioning about what to have my students call me. I'm not done with my PhD yet, so I'm not a "Dr." and I didn't want to be called "Ms." because that is just stupid. And the reality is, I have a really informal, unpretentious personality, so it just didn't make sense to call me "Professor Smith" or whatever. So I'm just going with my first name.

It was a tough decision because probably about half the class is older than me (I'm not super young, but these grad students are a bit older - especially since I'm teaching a night class and most of them have jobs during the day) and I wondered whether it would be a problem if I was too informal.

But I really don't think true respect comes from a title anyway. What do you other professors on here have your students call you?
Congrats!!! When I was an undergrad, it was strange to be able to call professors by their first names, and it was very rare. They were certainly professor or doctor or what not. When I was in graduate school a lot went by their first names which was nice. I was still calling them Dr. so and so but it felt a lot more like an adult-to-adult conversation rather than me being some little throwaway student lol! I think having older, masters students calling you by your first name is totally okay! Make them be responsible for their work though!!!
 

TygerKitty

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Interesting @ changes to the GRE... I did think the vocab was pretty stupid! I don't understand the 'memorized' answers to writing prompts though - I certainly had no idea what they were going to ask me. I got a perfect score though! wooooooot
 

katherine22

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Interesting @ changes to the GRE... I did think the vocab was pretty stupid! I don't understand the 'memorized' answers to writing prompts though - I certainly had no idea what they were going to ask me. I got a perfect score though! wooooooot
Good for you. I am graduating Summa Cum laude from a master's progra
 

katherine22

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Erm, did i mention i have an 'nc' in theatre arts... possibly.. though i may have failed dance.?? :D
Bet you are all too impressed with my grey matter to even speak.. please don't worry, you can approach me.. i still talk to the little people! (though i do laugh behind their backs as they try to form conversations properly.. silly wee insects i want to crush with my mighty academic fist of steel!!... erm i mean.. yeah.. i'm approachable!)
:D

We are impressed with all your matters- you couldn't have failed anything since you would have won them with your wit, my dear.
 

tonynyc

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**BUMP***

Time to bump this thread- New Year starting ... what is everyone up to
 

thirtiesgirl

frumious bandersnatch
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Ah, bumped thread. I work as a high school counselor for the Los Angeles Unified School District, so I guess I'm in academia. I have an MA in educational counseling, and have some experience working with kids with special needs - learning disabilities, behavioral and emotional disorders.

To answer McBeth's question about titles, I prefer Ms. Not that I have another title, but I feel it instills a sense of respect in my students and confidence in my abilities as a counselor. I want them to trust me to tell me whatever they feel they need to say, but I'm not a friend that they joke around with. I don't mind them using the first initial of my last name to shorten it, you know like "Hey, Ms. H.," or "Hey, Ms. B." But I like the level of respect and confidence that Ms. instills in my interactions with my students.
 

KittyKitten

Nerdysillysweetspicysaucy
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MS degree in Biology over here! I am now studying to earn a teaching license (almost finished) and ultimately teach at the university level.
 

hrd

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i'm new here, so i'm a bit late to this thread, but i love hearing everyone's academic success stories - i'm a complete book nerd, so i have an ms in library/archival science, and i'm a mini thesis away from an ma in english lit -
 

aocutiepi

a beautiful mess.
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BA in Applied Vocal Music and Spanish Language and Literature. Working toward a Masters in Public Health and a Doctorate of Pharmacy. Love my academic life!
 

tonynyc

Slow Dance Aficionado
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BA in Applied Vocal Music and Spanish Language and Literature. Working toward a Masters in Public Health and a Doctorate of Pharmacy. Love my academic life!
Congrats- talk about a busy schedule...
 

Aust99

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I've seen this thread so many times before but never posted... So many awesome woman here... Anyway, I have a BA in Primary Education... I'm currently teaching grade one and I'm starting my masters in Education Administration and Leadership in July. Eek! Back to study (part time) after 7 years.... Daunting.
 

Miss Vickie

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Working on my Advanced Nurse Practitioner degree (in family practice), and Masters in Nursing. I'm done with my clinicals and didactic, and now it's all about the paperwork and thesis. I figure by the end of the year I'll be totally done and ready to practice.

In some ways it's gone really fast, but in others? Endless!
 

Theatrmuse/Kara

Warrior Momma
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BS in Music History and Composition and minor in Vocal Performance, MFA in Theatre with an emphasis in Voice and Speech, and now enjoying being an instructor of Communication at Asheville Buncombe Tech. with the best department EVER (after 20 years of adjuncting teaching music history, theatre history, music and theatre appreciation, acting, voice for the actor and a few others.) I am considering beginning my PhD, but also considering the freedom of semi-retirement, LOL!
 

EMH1701

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3. Given the current economic state- some folks feel that they can get a better ROI with an MBA or Law Degree or other type of Terminal Masters (MS) Program (ie, Master in Public Health, Masters in Urban Planning) [/COLOR]


That is the reason why I am going back for my MBA. I'm taking classes part-time while working full-time. I'm very worried about the direction of our economy and the future of our country, and I'm afraid that without an MBA, I will find myself unable to get a job in 10 years.
 

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