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RedVelvet

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What he said.

Of course....he said the opposite of me...but its all very true, and said far better than I can.

In other words..what works for you is what works.


me....I just eyeball it....I have the weird ability to match color....to the point of doing repair.
 

stan_der_man

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First, do a little study on color theory:

This one has pretty colors. :p

This one gets more into the meat of it.

...

Have fun, Stan!
...to add to the question about color mixing.

Years of working in my dad's body shop as his apprentice helped me learn how to color match, other than that I've been doing this since I was five. Practice.

A little poem I just made up for you,

Don't add black; you can't go back.
Too much white; you'll have a fight.

Walk towards reds, and greens and blues,
but mixing all makes muddy shoes.
...
Thanks Tina and Tnekk, this weekend I'm going to do some house cleaning, I hope to have a chance to mess around with my art stuff and supplies. I'll try out what you guys and RedV said earlier.

What he said.

Of course....he said the opposite of me...but its all very true, and said far better than I can.

In other words..what works for you is what works.


me....I just eyeball it....I have the weird ability to match color....to the point of doing repair.
That's the beauty of art. Doing things differently, yet correctly in their own way is what makes works of art unique!

P.S. RedVelvet, The wrought iron grill at the end of my "portfolio" thread is the one I told you about (I'm guessing '20s - '30s) Seriously, if you want it it's yours, I'm cleaning stuff out this weekend...
http://www.dimensionsmagazine.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=25876&stc=1&d=1188312265

Stan
 

RedVelvet

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JoyJoy

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You've all been great inspiration for me, too. I think I'm going to do some playing around this weekend, as well. I remember that I have a couple of paintings I did when I was just fooling around. I might scan them and post them, just to get some input.

Seriously, folks...with the ones I've already posted, and any others, I would welcome constructive criticism....especially on the self-portrait I posted.
 

Tina

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You're welcome Stan. Have fun! :)
That's really raw and demanding! :bow:
If that is to me, T, thank you. I've found that the longer I go on, the more I enjoy non-objective art -- creating it, too. I still love realism (and all of the other art isms), but art that is just about color really does it for me. :)

I really like your color poems, and the advice in your post to Stan is totally right on. You painted cars, eh? That'll definitely teach a person about color!
 

RedVelvet

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You've all been great inspiration for me, too. I think I'm going to do some playing around this weekend, as well. I remember that I have a couple of paintings I did when I was just fooling around. I might scan them and post them, just to get some input.

Seriously, folks...with the ones I've already posted, and any others, I would welcome constructive criticism....especially on the self-portrait I posted.

I would love to, sweetheart..but they never SHOWED for me! I couldnt get them to display...
 

JoyJoy

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I would love to, sweetheart..but they never SHOWED for me! I couldnt get them to display...
Hmm...pm me your email address, and I'd be happy to send them! I can't figure why they wouldn't show....I uploaded them the same way I always do. Perhaps there's a problem with the file itself?
 

tnekkralc1956

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... what I gave you is just a set of guidelines to a reign in on the mixing/muddying temptation.

I've never been to school. Personally, I just look at 'it' and know it's color, etc, like RV. Like Tina I know the theory and the math.

I always intuitively know how to get the color I want, but that certainly doesn't help you. I watch someone demonstrate a medium once and then I do it myself. Once again that really doesn't help you.

The crap about the body shop is only half true: I already knew how to mix :D ...
 

Tina

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Ah, okay. :) I think that sometimes it really does come naturally. It happened that way for me, too. School on top of that really helped, and particularly color theory and before that, design classes. I would love to take more. That and life drawing classes. Even though I have my own, private model in Eric, there's something about being in the classroom setting, with different models, male and female, that I kept it challenging.

Anyway, intuitive or not, it can always be learned, an then it become intuitive. :)
 

Tina

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Seriously, folks...with the ones I've already posted, and any others, I would welcome constructive criticism....especially on the self-portrait I posted.
Joy, that self-portrait is so personal to you that I would have a hard time commenting on it when it comes to technical aspects.

Critiques are funny things. Whenever I was critiqued in my art or writing, no one ever, as in EVER, got it right when they tried to talk about my intent, what it means, etc. Beyond that, I haven't seen enough of your work to know your style. The self-portrait seems to be somewhat in the Primitive genre, and also seems very dark, emotionally, to me. I see judgement, a certain amount of paranoia and strife (from the eyes on the right), while also wishing for a better life and some sort of break from reality (from the utopian scene on the left). And I'm probably wrong about all of it, but it's what I feel from it. Because it makes me feel those things (actual discomfort, in ways), it is an effective piece of art whether I am right or not.

Now, your study in shade and tone, also has an element of structure in it (looking at it in design terms). I adore it. It is dynamic, because of the mixture of line directions, and the curved diagonals (diagonals often make design dynamic and less static, and overall direct better eye flow). Even though it could have the potential of feeling constrained and/or trapped (because of the bars), it doesn't feel that way at all. I also favor complementary color schemes, and you got it in that one, baby. :D It's actually something that I would enjoy looking at on a regular basis.
 

JoyJoy

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Joy, that self-portrait is so personal to you that I would have a hard time commenting on it when it comes to technical aspects.

Critiques are funny things. Whenever I was critiqued in my art or writing, no one ever, as in EVER, got it right when they tried to talk about my intent, what it means, etc. Beyond that, I haven't seen enough of your work to know your style. The self-portrait seems to be somewhat in the Primitive genre, and also seems very dark, emotionally, to me. I see judgement, a certain amount of paranoia and strife (from the eyes on the right), while also wishing for a better life and some sort of break from reality (from the utopian scene on the left). And I'm probably wrong about all of it, but it's what I feel from it. Because it makes me feel those things (actual discomfort, in ways), it is an effective piece of art whether I am right or not.

Now, your study in shade and tone, also has an element of structure in it (looking at it in design terms). I adore it. It is dynamic, because of the mixture of line directions, and the curved diagonals (diagonals often make design dynamic and less static, and overall direct better eye flow). Even though it could have the potential of feeling constrained and/or trapped (because of the bars), it doesn't feel that way at all. I also favor complementary color schemes, and you got it in that one, baby. :D It's actually something that I would enjoy looking at on a regular basis.
Tina, you're pretty right on about the self portrait. I've always felt that people see a distorted view of me....and I'm very much a loner...hense the eyes seeing me through a glass brick wall....although what you see certainly does play into it. The left side is my nirvana...my spirit..what I truly connect with, and then there is some symbolism in the willow tree that I won't get into here.

I appreciate your other comments, as well. It's a great feeling to have someone enjoy your work.

Here are some older ones of mine:

View attachment 25932

View attachment 25933

View attachment 25934
 

RedVelvet

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Joy...I got your email with your work and I wanted to post about it here.

I LOOOOOOOOVE your distinct style...its dirivative of no one else (unlike me, who has decidedly Peter Max or De Lempika overtones).

The self portrait you consider heavy or overpainted.....comes across as....NOT! I LOVE this painting. There is a warm, folk or even "outsider art" tone to it, but it also has a great deal of sophistication. The combination is so charming. It reminds me of an extraordinary Tarot deck I own that was entirely handpainted (I collect unusual Tarot decks for their art).

All of your work has a.......sort of vintage feel that I cant really describe or even place. Its all so personal, I, like Tina, feel rather ill equipped to comment on it.

I just know I love it.

Truly.

I blow smoke up no one's arse.
 

stan_der_man

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You've all been great inspiration for me, too. I think I'm going to do some playing around this weekend, as well. I remember that I have a couple of paintings I did when I was just fooling around. I might scan them and post them, just to get some input.

Seriously, folks...with the ones I've already posted, and any others, I would welcome constructive criticism....especially on the self-portrait I posted.
Joy, an honest to goodness, old fashioned art school critique of your artwork is on it's way. I want to take a good look at them and I'll get back, hopefully tonight.

Stan
 

stan_der_man

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Joy,
Here is the critique of your work as you asked, and a la art school style as I promised above. I hope you aren't offended by the bluntness, but I've always found straight forward discussion the most helpful, and actually one thing I miss about being in an academic setting as far as art goes.

Begin critique:

My critique bias... I tend to prefer art that immediately draws me in with some primary element that I can focus on. Once I am attracted to this focal element I'm more inclined to think about meaning or other intrinsic elements of the piece.

This a pen and ink abstract using corn husks as a design model.
http://www.dimensionsmagazine.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=25360&d=1187741003

The perspective of this piece immediately draws me into this painting. I like how the symmetry and asymmetry work together. Without being informed that this was modeled after cornhusks I wouldn’t recognize that, but I don’t find that to be an important element. The lines draw my eye to the upper right, but the biomorphic shapes are interesting and keep me focused there. I like the sprouts on the shapes in the lower right they help disrupt the flow of the prominent lines and also bring a recognizable biomorphic element into the mix. The shapes themselves in the lower right, I don’t understand, they seem somewhat disjoint with the rest of the piece.


-------------------------

This was my first attempt at a self-portrait, done in acrylics and pastel...meant to convey how I think the world views me as opposed to how I view myself. A bit cheesy, could use some work, but it's something I'd like to try to tackle again...perhaps in watercolor.
http://www.dimensionsmagazine.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=25362&d=1187741222

Joy, if this is your first attempt at a self-portrait, it is absolutely amazing! I do immediately understand the idea of this piece (as you have stated) that others are looking upon you. Eyes looking upon someone commonly symbolize that, cliché as that may be, it works in your painting. I do like how the eyes are different sizes, some being obscured by the lines between the bricks (glass bricks?), they aren’t a typical bunch of eyeballs staring at you, that blunts the cliché aspect of the eyes. My initial take on this piece is that you are part of the earth, nature, or of the earth, you are a mother with a child. The figure of you is clearly the focal point of this piece and is beautifully painted. The child as a conceptual element works wonderfully, but is a weaker element aesthetically, somewhat two-dimensional compared to all of the richly painted (having a sheen to them) surroundings. But you as the mother are the central point of this piece, so that’s not so critical. The image of you is very striking and generally well blended into the other elements. I like how your hair flows into water, but the objects in the water (rocks?) are not recognizable to me and distracting. Recognizing that a small photograph of this painting may not do it justice, I like the over all texture of this piece. I think it has a sheen and feel to it that is consistent. The child seems a bit two-dimensional and the moon and clouds seem crammed above the tree. The tree could be a bit smaller to accommodate the moon and clouds, or you could have left them out. The moon does balance out the over all image though.

I would find an image of just you by yourself in this style to be very interesting. This is a wonderful painting, but the image of you is so strong in this piece that the surroundings and message are interesting, but not necessary for a sucessful painting.


-------------------------

This was a study in shade and tone that turned out far better than I had hoped.
http://www.dimensionsmagazine.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=25363&d=1187741234

I think you accurately describe this piece Joy. It’s an interesting study in shade, tone and colour. It’s a very fun painting to look at. This painting is a classic isometric illusion, how the shades of the oranges building become stripes on the blue foreground form. It’s fun how the stripes of shade seem to make sense but in reality they wouldn’t. The colours are a good combination also.


-------------------------

Untitled
(Eye)

http://www.dimensionsmagazine.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=25932&d=1188373238

I like this painting simply because it fulfills my personal requirements in what I like about a painting. I focus on the object that looks like an eye and the texture of the circles surrounding the eye visually give me reason to look elsewhere on the painting. I find the colours interesting but nothing exciting. Again, maybe the small image that I am looking at doesn’t do justice to this painting.

-------------------------

Untitled
(Blue Flowers)

http://www.dimensionsmagazine.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=25933&d=1188373292

I find this painting to be somewhat static. There are interesting elements here; the flow and balance of this painting are good. The colours are good, but nothing exciting. The vaguely recognizable face at the top is interesting. The tree (or blue flowing object) at the left leads me up to the face in a nice way and brings balance to this painting.

-------------------------

Untitled
(Red Green Blue Texture)

http://www.dimensionsmagazine.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=25934&d=1188373337

What I find interesting about this painting… I immediately wrote it off as being boring, and as being the weakest of your paintings. But after looking at it a few times, I’m drawn to what appear to be two figures at the lower right. One seems feminine, and the other figure further right seems to be that of a male looking down. I’m glad that you gave no description to this piece, I would have looked for the meaning that you intended, maybe found it and then just written this off. Again, I imagine that a great deal of texture, sheen and other elements are lost in the photograph. This would be an interesting piece to see in person, I don’t think the photograph does it justice.

-------------------------

You are a wonderful artist Joy, I hope to see more of your work. I hope you didn’t mind the bluntness of this critique, but you asked for it. I personally find this type of discussion the most helpful when it comes to evaluating my art and myself. And by all means, feel free to disregard any portion of my critique that you find unfounded… I would do the same :)

Stan
 

JoyJoy

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Stan, Arvee...thanks so much for your very valuable input. It's so encouraging and useful to get honest feedback on my work. I'm never offended by bluntness, especially when there's something contructive to go with it. I love hearing how my art effects others in learning what works and what doesn't. So..thank you again!!

I'm in the middle of two other works that I hope to complete in the next week or two, but in the meantime, I want to cheat a little and brag on my daughter, who is a wonderful artist in her own right. This is a piece she did for her senior art class, which she recently entered in an art competition and won a "Superior" ranking.

Her self-portrait, a collage done entirely in tiny pieces of magazine pictures: View attachment 26455

Close-ups of the eyes:
View attachment 26456

View attachment 26457
 
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