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Classical Music Appreciation

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Barrett

OMG, Becky, look at his belly.
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@Shotha
I would be very interested in your thoughts on this very talented young lady(Yuja Wang)'s performance of
Beethoven's Piano Sonata No.29 in B♭ Major, Opus 106, the daunting "Hammerklavier."


I will listen with rapt attention to Ms. Lisitsa's performance as soon as I see to the morning needs of my cats, who are awaiting impatiently for their morning breakfast.

ETA: Ms. Lisitsa has a lovely touch on the keys, and yes, she is very good. I'll be looking up her other performances. Thanks for sharing!
 
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Shotha

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@Shotha
I would be very interested in your thoughts on this very talented young lady(Yuja Wang)'s performance of
Beethoven's Piano Sonata No.29 in B♭ Major, Opus 106, the daunting "Hammerklavier."


I will listen with rapt attention to Ms. Lisitsa's performance as soon as I see to the morning needs of my cats, who are awaiting impatiently for their morning breakfast.

ETA: Ms. Lisitsa has a lovely touch on the keys, and yes, she is very good. I'll be looking up her other performances. Thanks for sharing!
Hi, @Barrett. It took me a while to fit such a long piece into my "schedule". Fortunately this is a long weekend in New Zealand.

I've been following this young lady as best I can but had never heard her play the Hammerklavier Sonata before this. Obviously, she has great stamina, this piece being noted for its taxing length. She exercises great control over her dynamics, which is important when performing a dramatic composer such as Beethoven. Her control of dynamics also allows her to bring out each separate strand of melody and motif clearly. I think that I'm probably just saying what the music critics say about here but in different words. I particularly like her execution of the Fugue in the Fourth Movement, where here ability to keep the "voices" separate is so crucially important.

Beautiful pussy cat.
 
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LoveDDD

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I thought, perhaps, that it deserved its own thread, since it is something of a niche interest.
I'll prime the pump, so to speak.

Vivaldi: L'estro armonico Concerto No.10 in B-minor for 4 violins

I also like some Broadway, some new stuff, and a lot of old school… I'm a picky music person but I love music so much it's transformative :)
 

Shotha

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Stabat Mater by Giovanni Battista Pergolesi (1736)

When I was younger, I remember this being an Easter treat broadcast by Radio 3, the UK's classical music channel. One critic described the short instrumental introduction as "a calculated crescendo of dissonance". Dissonant chords are the ones which tear most at our heart strings.

 

Barrett

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I've posted in another thread of my love for Howard Shore's The Lord of the Rings film trilogy score, especially the Complete Recordings.
I was listening to the Fellowship of the Ring portion today while doing some busy work, and had to pause what I was doing when a particular section of this song played. (1:01 to 1:23). That particular phrase just tears at my heart.

And that track is followed by this one ("Passing of the Elves," aka "Elvish Lament"), which is just beautiful, in my opinion, so my break went a little longer.
 

Shotha

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This is Pachelbel's Canon in D performed as it would have been in Pachelbel's time by the Academy of St Martin in the Fields conducted by Neville Marriner, revered performers of old music in the UK. Pachelbel's work languished in obscurity for centuries, as Baroque and pre-Baroque music went out of fashion. His Canon became popular during the 1970's due to a French recording but that doesn't explain how it became popular amongst people, who were not aficionados of "classical music". I think that it's universal popularity started, when it was used as background music to a Pure New Wool advertisement in the UK. Suddenly it was among the top 10 classics and it is now popular for both weddings and funerals with its feeling of serene bliss. The numerous different versions of it these days testify to its polularity.

It makes me cry, too.


 

Barrett

OMG, Becky, look at his belly.
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This is Pachelbel's Canon in D performed as it would have been in Pachelbel's time by the Academy of St Martin in the Fields conducted by Neville Marriner, revered performers of old music in the UK. Pachelbel's work languished in obscurity for centuries, as Baroque and pre-Baroque music went out of fashion. His Canon became popular during the 1970's due to a French recording but that doesn't explain how it became popular amongst people, who were not aficionados of "classical music". I think that it's universal popularity started, when it was used as background music to a Pure New Wool advertisement in the UK. Suddenly it was among the top 10 classics and it is now popular for both weddings and funerals with its feeling of serene bliss. The numerous different versions of it these days testify to its polularity.

It makes me cry, too.


That vid is blocked for us Yanks, but I trust that anything led by Sir Marriner is good.
And I love Pachelbel's Canon.
 
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