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rickydaniels

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somewhat comic related. I got to meet Phil Ortiz, character creator and artist on the show for the first two seasons and active artist on the Simpsons Comic book. Super cool guy, awesome, friendly, great to talk to. Anyways, he simpsonized me. It was such an honor to have him do that for me. He CREATED CHARACTERS FROM THE SHOW!! A legend indeed.

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AWESOME MAN! Thanks for sharing that! I LOVE THE SIMPSONS!!
 

Allie Cat

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A few weeks ago, I asked in one of the threads if anybody knew of any good world history books. Well, I just happen to find a really good one, and in comics form no less.

Cartoon History of the Universe Vol. 1 by Larry Gonick is a thorough, yet humorous lookm at the history of our world and the universe, from the Big Bang tot he age of Alexander the Great. I enjoy the cartoony style the history is presented in. The little jokes help you to remember the basic facts of the times. I hope to find Volumes 2 and #, as well as The Cartoon History of the Modern World Vols. 1 - 2. This is a good way to introduce kids and adults alike to world history.
I was given volumes 1 and 2 when I was like 10; I read those books over and over and over... Got volume 3 as soon as it came out. I love those books.
 
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Weirdo890

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Anybody here into collecting classic comic strips? I have the first five collection of the complete Popeye series from Fantagraphics. I'm hoping to get the first volume of the complete Pogo series by Walt Kelly.
 

Hozay J Garseeya

Rooder. Crooder. Neuter.
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This has been a great weekend for me Comic Related. After going to my shop and getting to meet Phil Ortiz the Simpson's artist, I went back today and someone had stopped by the store and donated a box of comics that they had lying around. The Shop manager sold me the original 10 issues of V for Vendetta. How fucking cool is that?!?!? I was super stoked, all ten issues just there for the taking. It was a little weird seeing the 1988-1989 dates on the covers knowing I was about to buy them. It was great.
 
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Deven

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Guess who is getting her Absolute Watchmen?

I've also picked up the rest of the Anita Blake comics, since I'm 2 books behind. I only have the first book. I've read all the books, and they are essentially doing the books word for word, page by page. It's interesting to see my favorite book series in comic form. Some of the characters don't come across like I pictured them. Since they don't need to use the descriptive words anymore, it condenses into comics nicely.

Though, I really wish the Dabel Brothers would've been able to finish the entire series. I hate the artwork changes. Their version of Anita is exactly how I had her pictured.
 

Admiral_Snackbar

Veni, vidi, Lionel Richie
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So after DevenDoom sends me this link, I started thinking about the whole unfinished Watchmen business with Alan Moore. I personally don't have this overwhelming love for The Watchmen that many fans do; it's a wonderful book, a decent movie, and while I think Alan Moore is an amazing modern literary giant in the realm of graphic fiction, he's not Christ on a rocket. He does have a monstrous ego, he is wickedly intelligent, but he's one of many people who created something the fans never seem to tire of.

Now I don't wanna get off on a rant here, but in the interests of this diatribe, I present the example of how much I love Calvin and Hobbes. Fucking love it. It's an amazing strip on so many levels, and that in itself is evidence of its timeless appeal. For nearly 15 years I've wanted to see a resurgence of the strip, but to no avail. I understand the reasons, as much as I deeply respect Bill Watterson's desire to eschew merchandising and end the strip on a good note. If you've read his collections, especially the 10 year anniversary one, you recall where he basically chews syndicated comic pages a new asshole. In the same instance, you realize why he persists with letting C&H rest, to stand as it is for all time, and to hopefully show generations to come that art isn't just something you see on a studio wall.

You could say that Moore drew inspiration for his original Watchmen creations from older, out-of-print works and that he breathed life into them when he wrote his book, as I think all artists do. A part of their soul goes into it. He fought a very long, financially painful and morally detestable battle for his artistic rights (I believe in one situation, he likened a cross examination of being accused of molestation), all for want of keeping his art HIS.

You could also say he sold the rights for Watchmen, and once he did that it went into that weird limbo where all copyrighted works go when they're assimilated by conglomerates. To make a crude analogy, it's like a crackhead mom giving her baby up for adoption, then years later, when off the junk and her head finally clears, she realizes she wants that baby back. But sometimes you can't get that.

I think he has to just accept that the Man won, and move the fuck on. He has many other books, most of which are cherished by his fans, and he should simply rely on these works for his legacy and a symbol of his artistic purity. For him to go on and on now, basically disowning his Loyal Readers, simply because they want more of what he refuses to give, makes him sound like a whiny, poncy git. You can't keep trying to give a "fuck you" to the bastards who won...it gets old after a while. Accept you made a mistake (and he's not the first artist to be naively goaded into signing away a financially lucrative property), guard your remaining art with safes and chains and rise above it.

In this case, I say to Alan: WWSLD (What Would Stan Lee Do?). His current settlement with Marvel Studios aside (and given the fact he did deserve to see a profit from the movies based on his creation), Stan saw Spidey take on innumerable forms throughout the years. Ditto Bob Kane. Ditto Schuster/Siegel. As long as the owning company still gives them the nod, they should be happy, because Christ knows given the lack of attention in the public, to have their creations live on like that is something pretty special. The fans still haven't lost their desire to see the further adventures of the nerdy kid who got arachnid powers and uses them to fight evil, or the strange visitor from another planet who came to Earth with powers and abilities beyond those of mortal men. Alan Moore breathed life into something, and as any parent knows, your children don't always go places you want them to :).
 
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Jooplef

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I love Alan Moore, but I would have more sympathy for him if a) the Watchmen were original characters (most are knockoffs) and if b) he didn't regularly use and abuse the literary creations of such authors as Lewis Carroll and Arthur Conan Doyle.

If he can depict Alice having orgies with Dorothy Gale in Lost Girls then JMS can depict Rorshach petting puppies if he wants to. Fair is fair!

Click here for the animated prequels...
 

Deven

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I love Alan Moore, but I would have more sympathy for him if a) the Watchmen were original characters (most are knockoffs) and if b) he didn't regularly use and abuse the literary creations of such authors as Lewis Carroll and Arthur Conan Doyle.

If he can depict Alice having orgies with Dorothy Gale in Lost Girls then JMS can depict Rorshach petting puppies if he wants to. Fair is fair!

Click here for the animated prequels...
I love that parody...
 

marlowegarp

I wanna meet that dad
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I think Alan Moore has been on the fringe for long enough that eventually (like Hunter Thompson) the persona has begun to supercede the actual man. I won't be buying the new Watchmen books, but for a creator to believe that he can (or has the right to) dictate buying terms to his readership shows that he has forgotten ever being a reader himself. The supposition that nothing better than Watchmen has come out since 1985 is laughable to begin with and is made doubly so coming from someone who no longer reads comics.
 

Deven

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I think Alan Moore has been on the fringe for long enough that eventually (like Hunter Thompson) the persona has begun to supercede the actual man. I won't be buying the new Watchmen books, but for a creator to believe that he can (or has the right to) dictate buying terms to his readership shows that he has forgotten ever being a reader himself. The supposition that nothing better than Watchmen has come out since 1985 is laughable to begin with and is made doubly so coming from someone who no longer reads comics.
I don't think with Moore it's a persona. I think Moore is flat out loony toons. Thompson's ending was tragic (and my forum sig is actually Thompson.) I think Moore's end won't be as such.

And as for Watchmen: They intended to do this with Moore before he severed ties with DC. They even approached Moore this time, offering him the rights back to Watchmen, which is what he left DC over. He told them too late. This is a child screaming about spilled milk.
 

BTB

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And now for something completely different:
I bought my Copy of the recently appeared "The Someday Funnies". This is an anthology which was conceived in the seventies and Contributions were collected but it took about a third of a century to be printed.
It is great. Pieces by the Masters Jack Kirby, Will Eisner,Rene Goscinny and More. And Contributions by Non-Comic-Personas like Tom Wolfe, Pete Townshend and Frank Zappa. And even Ned Sonntag. I was pleasantly surprised to find him in there.
If you like non Superhero Comics get it and marvel.
 

Deven

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I don't know about the rest of you, but I LOVED IT!!!!!
We need spoiler tags!


So, I will post it in white:

There is one storyline with Thanos that I can really remember in the Avengers comics: The Infinity Gauntlet (which was seen briefly in Thor, in Odin's Vault.) He wipes out half the population of the Universe with it. The Avengers in that storyline were Spider-Man, Wolverine, The Hulk, Ms. Marvel, and Dr. Doom. They also have apparently introduced Thanos as the first villain in the new Avengers Assemble comics.

Do we have anyone who reads Spawn out there? Hubby just finished the latest, and holy crap! (I'm still catching up...)
 

Weirdo890

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Do you guys go to the comic book shop? What kind of experiences have you had there? Have you ever met the "Comic-Book Guy" types?
 

Deven

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Do you guys go to the comic book shop? What kind of experiences have you had there? Have you ever met the "Comic-Book Guy" types?
I first walked into a comic shop when I was 16... and the guys playing D&D in the small town shop acted like I was freaking Princess Leia. It became a normal hang out (it was also next to a small bookstore that I frequented, the owners and I becoming such good friends that I didn't buy books. I'd bring them a sackful of my old used ones and could take a reasonable amount in exchange [they were a new/used bookstore.])

I even went on a few dates with a guy that hung out there, but he was unfortunately a Yankee while I was a Rebel (no, seriously... he was a Civil War re-en actor.) We didn't really stop seeing each other for that reason, but it was a "no chemistry" deal.

We'd be gaming (be it tabletop or console) all afternoon, and food came, and no one would ever tell me my total. Like, I'd give the owner a 10 (he always ordered for the gang) and refused to ever take my money. Told me I was good for a customer draw just by having girl parts...

I still talk to and love them to pieces. We play D&D when we can together now.

I was spoiled.
 

Tad

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The great white north, eh?
Do you guys go to the comic book shop? What kind of experiences have you had there? Have you ever met the "Comic-Book Guy" types?
I bought comics for about a dozen years or so (12 - 24), before giving up for financial reasons (they do add up over a year....) and stories getting too repetitive for my taste. I still have fond feelings towards a lot of the characters, just....when a series goes on indefinitely, it is hard to keep it fresh.

Anyway, in my years of buying, I never really met 'that guy,' but then again I didn't really hang around any of the stores I bought comics from. I was in, grab what I wanted, maybe spend a few minutes browsing to see if anything else caught my eye, then headed out again. I guess if you are looking to hang around with people who share your enjoyment of the comics, you'd have reason to hang around. But just popping in and out quickly does help protect you from the more annoying types :)
 

marlowegarp

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Spending time in the actual shops is key. I always found it interesting when I first started collecting (around age 8) and when I had a choice about where to get my books from, I'd usually seek out ones with a quirkier owner. One shop I went into for years was owned by a conservative Republican who would have Rush Limbaugh on the radio while he played Call of Cthulu with a group.

Comics have gotten a lot more mainstream so a shop nowadays is more often staffed by normal people and has the layout of a Starbucks.

As long as they're not pushy I like being able to just walk into a store and instantly get into a friendly debate about the merits of a certain book or writer.
 
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