Do you have any writing rules?

Discussion in 'Story Readers & Writers Dialogue Board' started by Widis, Aug 24, 2019.

  1. Aug 24, 2019 #1

    Widis

    Widis

    Widis

    What I Do Is Secret.

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    WG story writing rules, not ones to do with the use of adverbs and em dashes.

    My only hard one:

    1. No non-consent. That means no FA's fattening thin partners without them knowing, no fattening used as punishment, no fat people being used and abused for sex, etc. The closest I've come is one bimbofication story, and even in that case, the character took the intelligence-reducing drug willingly, it's just that she wasn't fully aware of how strong it was.​

    Note: I think fetish fiction should be a safe space for any content as long as it's properly labeled and kept away from people who could read it accidentally without knowing what they're getting into. Since it's an expression of the id, deals with taboo desires, and is only meant to be read by adults who look for it, you can put NC, underage, or whatever other kind of extreme fetishes in it. That's just my personal rule.

    The others are flexible and largely to do with avoiding genre cliches:

    2. No using the words orb, dome, or sphere to describe a belly. They're overused and not really accurate to the shape. Especially sphere, unless you're describing something found on Deviantart.

    3. Not too much focus on numbers or cup sizes. They're good for helping you picture the person's real life size or find photos to compare it to, if that's your thing, but they don't help you get a sense of what they actually look like IMO.

    4. I try to put plot and characterization before fetish content and sex, and I'll cut out a line that's hot but distracts from the actual direction the story's going in. This might be a mistake.
    All the rest are just personal preferences about what kind of fetishes I'm into or not, etc. Do you have a list, or is it just anything goes?
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2019
  2. Aug 24, 2019 #2

    lovelymars908

    lovelymars908

    lovelymars908

    Non-FA WG Writer

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    I can agree with 2 and 3. I'm pleased to say the cliche descriptions hardly factor into my writing but I obviously still need to tighten my grasp on organic detail a little more these days.


    1. No romance. I appreciate a good story every now and then, but I'm not into it for the most part only if it's a good subplot.

    2. No underage characters. I know the forums doesn't allow them in their library anyway. For me, I take a step further not even allowing teenage characters, especially under 18. I always have my characters at least 21 or up.

    3. I tend to be very lowkey with sexually explicit scenes these days. I don't like being very fanservicey it seems.

    4. I'm a story-driven WG writer to a T. I prefer my stories with substance and alluding to life lessons or morals. Something that's not a prominent feature in this genre of writing but I put a lot of investment into it regardless.

    I don't tend to write characters who are fat admirers because I don't relate to the inner workings of their lifestyle in particular and I don't think I'd do them justice to flesh them out beyond their status without derailing from it. And I can't say it's something I'd want to write in general.
     
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  3. Aug 25, 2019 #3

    John Smith

    John Smith

    John Smith

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    1. Never repeat the same denomination or adjective for someone or something in a same paragraph.
    2. Grammatical errors and lack of syntax are distasteful. Every flaw shall be fixed.
    3. Boring storytellings give headaches. Avoid those headaches.
    4. Always enriching his voculabary. Read a lot.
    5. If you don't feel it is worth to share this story, don't post it.
    That's all.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2019
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  4. Aug 25, 2019 #4

    agouderia

    agouderia

    agouderia

    Library Girl Staff Member Library Mod

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    The actual rules we have here on Dims are pretty straightforward and can be found here:

    https://www.dimensionsmagazine.com/threads/please-read-new-updated-library-guidelines.114853/

    And I agree with the previous posters that more use of spell and grammar check, as well as proofreading before posting would be helpful. It's understood that after dealing extensively with a text, one tends to overlook things. But there is a difference between one typo per page and texts that are almost unreadable due to constant errors.

    Otherwise, I don't really have writing "rules". I would prefer to call then preferences or goals.

    The main one is to actually develop a/several characters and tell their story, give insights into their world and treat them with the respect they deserve.
    That's why I'm also in the camp of not liking the too technical focussing on measurements - after all it's a story, not a spreadsheet or appliance manual.

    In line with this, it also makes me vary of fan fiction or the celebrity alternate reality stories. Because that is either stealing other writer's brain children or infringing on personality rights of actual people.
     
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  5. Sep 9, 2019 #5

    maltesefalcon

    maltesefalcon

    maltesefalcon

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    Biggest rule for me is finish it. It's much harder to do a good tale if it is published in many parts over months or even years.
    You could end up with continuity problems or may want to make changes based on events in new chapters.

    When the story is broken up by reader's comments, it just gets even harder to read.

    Then there is the inevitable writer's block where the tale either hits a dead end or the author simply loses interest. There are lots of potentially good stories that withered on the vine.
     

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