Do you speak any foreign languages

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Shotha

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And before we leave the topic of having a language or argot for fat, here is a list of my neologisms, which put a positive slant on fat. If I don't have a word for something, I invent a word for it. They always say, "The Greeks have a word for it." That's because they create new words as and when required. I admire that and so I do the same.

Benchbender: A guy who is so fat that park benches and other seats bend or groan beneath his weight.

Benchbreaker: A guy who is so enormously fat that park benches and other seats break or collapse beneath his weight.

Blubber-rubber: A guy who likes to play with his own or other guys' fat.

Fex: A monosyllabic abbreviation, which describes the best possible sex. It's a contraction of "fat sex" and refers to any sexual act, in which at least one of the participants is fat. It's far superior to other forms of sex, because there is more man to enjoy.

Girthday party (n.phr.): A celebration similar to a birthday party but marking a predetermined increase in girth rather than another year of age. Girthday parties can be used to celebrate each addition inch or centimeter of girth or a predetermine goal in girth or graduation to a new size in clothing.

Hot tub (n. ph.): a phrase describing an attractive, sexy, fat man.

Liebeskugel (n. fem): German for an attractive, large, well rounded protuberant belly.

Loveball (n): an attractive, large, well rounded and protuberant belly.

Pachyphile (n): Some one who loves fat and/or fat people.

Pachyphilia (n): The erotic or romantic love or admiration of fat or fat people.

Pachyphilic (adj): Given to or pertaining to the erotic or romantic love or admiration of fat or fat people.

Paunchographic (adj): Pertaining to images or literature relating to large bellies for the purpose of sexual gratification.

Paunchography (n): Images or literature relating to large bellies for the purpose of sexual gratification.
 

Rojodi

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I grew up hearing Polish, three dialects of French, and the Native language of where I live Kanienʼkéha (Mohawk), well mostly counting to 10 and the vulgarities LOL

I can now speak a little French, can sing Polish.
 

DazzlingAnna

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The word "Liebeskugel" was suggested to me as a translation of "loveball" by a German speaker. I don't know if he was joking with me.
🤔, Germans are not well known for joking a lot, right?😂

Translation is correct.

"Liebeskugel(n)" would be translated into English as "loveball" but also as "Geisha balls".
So, whoever told you the translation maybe wasn't aware of that.
 
Last edited:

Shotha

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🤔, Germans are not well known for joking a lot, right?😂

Translation is correct.

"Liebeskugel(n)" would be translated into English as "loveball" but also as "Geisha balls".
So, whoever told you the translation maybe wasn't aware of that.
It's not the sort of thing that I would know about. Neither would I think that my German informant would have known about it. So, I think it was a serious translation.
 

Shotha

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Another word that I invented is the word "nutcracker". Yes, I know that there already exists such a word but mine is new: same pronunciation, same spelling but different meaning. You know when men get really fat and get those rolls of fat around the top of the inner thigh. I call those "nutcrackers". I don't think that I have to explain why.
 

John Smith

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I am basically writing off in a tongue totally foreign to me, so to speak the English language.

Being born and raised in French Canada by a family originate from various African members-states of the Francophonie, I am very fluent in that said spoken language: even every once and again to the spite and bittering anger of a lot of people I've met and indicated signs of inferiority complex, especially those of French-Quebecker descent (whose popular culture often interprets anywhom masters their mother-anguage better than these native-born speakers like either a cue of intellectual or socioeconomical superiority nay pure snobism) who reacts about my fluency with hostility and mockery, let alone sometimes worse. However, I slowly noted that most of the English speakers I've met displays as much enmity when they're hearing my Metropolitan French-ish accent strip apart every pronounced word, simultaneously taunting me arrogantly about my poor spoken English savviness while being nonetheless pissed off by my classical English acumen and random insights. I used to be easily annoyed whenever anybody was taunting me or acting rude while I was trying to reflect on my words and to phrase out my thoughts or about how I needed to sometime ask my interlocutor to slow down a bit, but overtime I'd merely realizes something: if people were so concerned about my spoken English, they would try to reach me out for some help instead consistently trying to humiliate me... also, a fair number of these same people were far from being any better. Everytime I am dealing with such rude character and that it happens to be outside of the workplace, I merely stare at them with an uninviting "f***k off" smirk on my face. "Misery loves company" until the time there has neither such thing like misery.

Besides French and English or my past tribulations, I'm dabbling a little in Spanish (even if my understanding of the spoken standard Spanish has dimmed a bit, out of a lack of practising) , spoken Japanese (learning kanjis are however a tough time) then at last in Lingala, Kiswahili and (much poorer in) Kinyarwanda.

I earn a few moderable-to-greatly elusive cues within spoken both Classical & Levantine Arabic but not under their written form, in classical Latin, Romanicized Hebrew (their writing system gives me headaches) , in written German whose I attempted a while to learn by recommandation of an old friend in college but unsuccessfully, in Haitian Kreyol, in written Romanicized both Old Persian & Middle Persian / Pahlavi, in Avestan / Zend, Old Greek, Sanskrit, Romanicized Aramaic, Pashtun, standard Mandarin, Xhosa and Amazulu (whose both differs greatly from, but shares a distant kinship with both Lingala and Kiswahili) and tries since a while to fetch a little in Kikuyu (who differs a whit, but shares an intimate kinship within both Kiswahili and their common spoken Cushitic "Azanian" forerunner prior the Bantu-ization of East Africa) . I'd however forgot my cues in Amharaic and some Mayan dialect I attempted to learn a longtime ago.


During my adolescence, I had my "Tolkien-o-mania" phase and became pretty harcore about reading most everything about the late British author and philologist's lifetime-long High Fantasy Legendarium, its history, books and even fictitious tongues. Yet today, I and my oldest brother (who equally had that phase about the same range of age, years before I had mysrlf) still lasts the two only family members in the room who can grasp what the Elvish and Orcish characters are jibbering when they're speaking either in the Sindalrin or the Black Tongue whilse our family binge-watch LOTR or The Hobbit Trilogies.
Because we used to be hardcore Stargate fans, we can also get what the alien Goa'uld antagonists spoke in the TV show "Stargate SG1" .

Fictitious speech systems taken aside, I had also quite a basic understanding of a fewer extinct writing systems from the Near Eastern and the Nile, as well as their different languagues: Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian, Hurrian but most peculiarily the Old, Middle & Hieratic Egyptian forms of writing. Demotic, Sahidic & Coptic Egyptian sounds a little off to me, though.
I'd tried to fetch a little on that other extinct language native from the Horn of Africa and southwest Arabia, the Gu'ez language.

I'd once attempted to learn Hungarian and Korean, but they are quite difficult (especially Hungarian) . I'd quickly forgot everything I had been taught about those, yet Korean might still sound far less alien to me in comparison to the latter.
 

Shotha

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Hello!

I am a native speaker of Turkish, English, and German.

My command of French and Spanish is basic. My reading and listening comprehension is at about 70%, I'd say. My speaking skills are rather poor though. Been meaning to brush up on those. Perhaps now is a good time to finally get started! :)
Turkish is such a beautiful language. I wish I knew more than a few words of it. I've heard it called the Italian of the East. I love listening to the group Cafe Aman Istanbul, which is a Greek group but many of their songs are bilingual in Greek and Turkish. It's easy to see why so many who hear Turkish think it's a beautiful language.
 

MsUmai

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Turkish is such a beautiful language. I wish I knew more than a few words of it. I've heard it called the Italian of the East. I love listening to the group Cafe Aman Istanbul, which is a Greek group but many of their songs are bilingual in Greek and Turkish. It's easy to see why so many who hear Turkish think it's a beautiful language.
Thank you. I think so, too. Unfortunately, I will never know what Turkish sounds like to the foreign ear. I have heard different things. I have had people tell me it sounded like we're arguing when they overheard a conversation on the phone. Others told me it sounded melodic and soft. Different perceptions, I suppose. I hear it's difficult to learn, but I'd like to think otherwise. I believe once you get the gist of its basic rules, the learning process will flow.

I saw you mentioned Georgian (very rusty) in your list of languages. Now, that is one peculiar language! I started learning it in the past. My interest was sparked by my cousin's wife at the time, whose first language is Laz. Back then it was almost impossible to find any learning material on Laz as it is spoken by only a small number of people of Southern Caucasian descent, who are predominantly located on the Easter Black Sea coast of Turkey.
I came across Georgian in all my research as both languages are of the same family.
I'd still like to be able to speak both languages. :)
 

Shotha

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Thank you. I think so, too. Unfortunately, I will never know what Turkish sounds like to the foreign ear. I have heard different things. I have had people tell me it sounded like we're arguing when they overheard a conversation on the phone. Others told me it sounded melodic and soft. Different perceptions, I suppose. I hear it's difficult to learn, but I'd like to think otherwise. I believe once you get the gist of its basic rules, the learning process will flow.

I saw you mentioned Georgian (very rusty) in your list of languages. Now, that is one peculiar language! I started learning it in the past. My interest was sparked by my cousin's wife at the time, whose first language is Laz. Back then it was almost impossible to find any learning material on Laz as it is spoken by only a small number of people of Southern Caucasian descent, who are predominantly located on the Easter Black Sea coast of Turkey.
I came across Georgian in all my research as both languages are of the same family.
I'd still like to be able to speak both languages. :)
Obviously any language can sound different depending on the speaker but Turkish definitely ranks highly among those who have heard it.

Georgian and Laz both belong to the same family but Georgian is the only language of the family with a great literary tradition. Georgian is a difficult language with ejective consonants, long strings of consonants, a complicated case system and verbs which agree with the subject, direct object and indirect object and the tense of these varies depending on the tense of the verb. Laz is even hard because of more consonant clusters and lack of learning materials. There is a now almost extinct dialect of Greek from the same region, Pontic Greek, which was influenced by Turkish and Georgian. Pontic songs remain popular.
 

Quietpaws

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Mississippi
Native speaker of German. Took Spanish in school and loved it, all forgotten now. Picked up a few cuss words in Arabic. Leaned English by watching movies and playing old versions of D&D, Shadowrun. Learned some American Sign Language to be able to communicate with a woman that needed some longtime help. Love ASL, I was able to pick it up very fast as I am a visual learner. Haven't seen that woman in several years, so ASL is going down the drain again as I don't know anyone else that I can practice it with.
As for a secret code, I suggest to ask : Are you a friend of Dims?
 

Barbsjw

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Feb 21, 2020
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Vermont
Was looking at email, and saw a note from an admissions counselor. She mentioned that we will be welcoming several students from India this fall. Guess I need to learn Hindi. Any suggestions for programs?
 

Shotha

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Was looking at email, and saw a note from an admissions counselor. She mentioned that we will be welcoming several students from India this fall. Guess I need to learn Hindi. Any suggestions for programs?
A huge number of languages are spoken in India, the largest number of any country after Papua New Guinea. (Indian) English is the official language of Parliament, business and higher education. It is also the most widely used lingua franca throughout the country. Hindi is claimed to be the most widely spoken language in the north. However, recent attempts to make it the joint parliamentary language alongside English were put on hold after there was opposition to this from the south. As all of your students will speak English well, the main advantage of learning an Indian language is the sympathy that it would show towards Indian students and their cultures. I found that studying Sanskrit made Indians feel comfortable with me, whatever their native language and whatever geographical region they come from.
 

Funtastic curves

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Wow! I'm impressed by all the different languages known by so many of you.

It's crazy because my daughter wants to learn many different languages. This has been a goal of hers since she was 8.

Our native language is English. I took 2 years of French in high school. I know a few words in Spanish. I grew up in Detroit on the borderline of Hamtramck (polish community) I can recognize a few words. I've also grew up around or near the Arabic community. (Detroit has 2 of the largest Arabic communities in the U.S.) my mom had very close Arabic friends. We visited with them often. They only spoke English outside the home. But because the grandmother only spoke Arabic they mostly spoke it at home. This is a common practice in our area. So I can recognize a few word.

My daughter took 2 years of Spanish in elementary school. It was mandatory that they take a language in her school.

During her first year of middle school students took an language class that consisted of French, Spanish, German and Japanese. It was to introduce the students to other languages but also to give them an idea on what language they wanted to study. Because it's mandatory to have 2 years in high school. My daughter chose German at the completion of the class.

My daughter took German in her last years of middle school and continued it in High school. She will be going on her 3rd year of German this Fall. I know nothing in German and she speaks it around the house all the time. Just because she can.

She is now contemplating on learning a new language during the summer. I'm not sure what but I'll update you once she decides.
 
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