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Shotha

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Thanks @Shotha ! I was thinking of learning their language as a show of support and solidarity.
I'm sure that, whichever one of their languages you have a go out, will show support and solidarity. It will also get you invitations to all of their festivals. If you get invited to a Bhagavad Gita study group, that's well worth taking up.
 

Shotha

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Given I studied Spanish, could I BS my way through Frenxh?
Probably not, but you could probably BS your way through Italian or Portuguese. Spanish will help you with French but French is one of the most difficult of European languages to learn to pronounce well. If you want to follow Spanish with another Romance language, then the three most useful languages are, going from easiest to hardest, Italian, Portuguese, French.
 

op user

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French look just similar enough to put you in troubles. For those with a linguistic background they are full of "false friends" words that are similar to other languages but they mean something different.
 

op user

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Barbsjw I stand corrected you see I translated the expression from French into English and it is a prime facie case of "false cognate".
 

Shotha

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@Barbsjw and @op user There is a difference between false cognates and false friends.

Cognates are words in related languages, which have decended from the same word in a common ancestor language. False cognates are groups of words, which seem to have a common ancestor but do not share a common ancestor. For example, the English verb "to have" and the Latin verb "habeō", which also means "to have", are frequently assumed to have a common origin. English "to have" is in fact cognate with the Latin "capiō", which means "to take".

False friends is a phrase used by language teachers and language learners. It is not a technical term in linguistics. False friends are words, which look similar, whether or not thye are cognates, and which are therefore frequently misunderstood or mistranslated. For example the French verb "attendre" does not mean "to attend" but "to wait for". Although the English verb "to attend" was borrowed from the French verb "attendre", it is a borrowing and not a cognate. The French word "coin" does not mean a "coin" but a "corner". And there are many more false friends between English and French.
 

op user

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Slotha, linguistics at a forum is a refreshing addition and creates knowledge and pleasure. Linguistics taught at a community college specializing in marketing because the language teacher is too lazy to teach something useful is a nasty issue. Personal experience speaking here.

Thanks for your input though.
 

Shotha

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Slotha, linguistics at a forum is a refreshing addition and creates knowledge and pleasure. Linguistics taught at a community college specializing in marketing because the language teacher is too lazy to teach something useful is a nasty issue. Personal experience speaking here.

Thanks for your input though.
I wouldn't have said anything about false friends and false cognates, it there had been no confusion of the two phrases.

By the way my name is Shotha with "SH" at the beginning.
 

op user

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I wouldn't have said anything about false friends and false cognates, it there had been no confusion of the two phrases.

By the way my name is Shotha with "SH" at the beginning.
I had a very bad experience with a French language teacher as you can guess - no as I come to think I had bad experience with most French teachers I encountered.

Shotha I should have used Ctrl C / Ctrl P and spelled it correctly.
 

op user

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Out of respect to our ladies here I would refrain from counting out the times French teacher behaved a bit un-educationaly to say the least.
 

Jon Blaze

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English (fluent)
Spanish (conversational)
Japanese (casually but was conversational-level as a kid living in Japan)
French, Italian, Portuguese - Below casual but sometimes added understanding through experiences and a general foundation in Romance-based languages.
Thai, Mandarin, Korean, Tagalog, German - Just single words like "Hello" and "Thank you"
 

Orso

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Italian is my mother tongue, I speak fluently English, French and Persian/Farsi, my Russian is a bit rusty (haven't used it in 4 years), I understand German and I can make myself understood, but I respect too much the language of Luther, Goethe and Mann to try and speak it, and I can somehow get around with Spanish (for an Italian it's easy). Once I could also go around and make myself understood in Arab countries, but this happened long ago.
 
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