Do you speak any foreign languages

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agouderia

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I'm a native English and German speaker and I speak:-

French (professional fluency) , Modern Greek and Italian (conversational),
Spanish (basic active and intermediate passive knowledge)

And some school Latin...
The thing also is, the more proficient you are in more languages, the easier grasping other, related ones becomes.

Like being a native English and German speaker, getting the gist of and especially reading Dutch/Flemish is no big deal. Yiddish is 80% medieval German, and especially if one if familiar with the Berlin region dialect, basic understanding comes easy.

Same applies to the Romance languages- if you know Italian, reading Romanian or Catalan is not too difficult. Or the combination of Italian and Spanish also makes reading Portuguese possible (...understanding in that case actually is easier the other way around because of the accent and pronounciation).

Ironically, knowing Modern Greek even gives you basic vocab knowledge in Turkish because the long Ottoman rule in Greece with Greeks running a significant portion of trade and administration in Constantinople/Istanbul has lead to a pretty significant pool of loanwords in both languages.
 

Shotha

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The thing also is, the more proficient you are in more languages, the easier grasping other, related ones becomes.

Like being a native English and German speaker, getting the gist of and especially reading Dutch/Flemish is no big deal. Yiddish is 80% medieval German, and especially if one if familiar with the Berlin region dialect, basic understanding comes easy.

Same applies to the Romance languages- if you know Italian, reading Romanian or Catalan is not too difficult. Or the combination of Italian and Spanish also makes reading Portuguese possible (...understanding in that case actually is easier the other way around because of the accent and pronounciation).

Ironically, knowing Modern Greek even gives you basic vocab knowledge in Turkish because the long Ottoman rule in Greece with Greeks running a significant portion of trade and administration in Constantinople/Istanbul has lead to a pretty significant pool of loanwords in both languages.
So far, no one has mentioned the joy that comes of knowing more than one language. It opens up so many new friendships and sources of information for you. With just a smattering of the local language, you get VIP treatment. You can interact with so many other people. It gives you insight into other cultures. And, of course, it always looks good on your CV and so it can help you find a job.
 

agouderia

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So far, no one has mentioned the joy that comes of knowing more than one language. It opens up so many new friendships and sources of information for you. With just a smattering of the local language, you get VIP treatment. You can interact with so many other people. It gives you insight into other cultures. And, of course, it always looks good on your CV and so it can help you find a job.
Joy, fun and often incredulous faces when phenotype and language skills or passport and language skills diverge definitely is an element.

To me even more important is that different languages introduce you to different ways of thinking - and help explain why societies develop along certain lines in the various countries. Because each language is good for expressing certain subject matters - which again explain the ingrained thought patterns of a given country.

Like English is great for analytical writing and all things short and snappy in marketing. French excells in sophisticated pathos and mission statements while German is top choice for multi-layered historical processes or socio-psychological waffling. Naturally Italian for opera...
Or often the active use respectively non-existence of term will tell you a lot about how a system works (or is dysfunctional).
 

Shotha

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To me even more important is that different languages introduce you to different ways of thinking - and help explain why societies develop along certain lines in the va
A people's history is written in its language. For example, if Britain had not been invaded by the Norman French, then English would not have such a huge number of Old French words in its vocabulary. These words are borrow specifically from Anglo-Norman French, e.g. the word "cat". In other Old French dialects the word was "chat", pronounces like our work "chat". The word wasn't pronounce "sha" by the French until much later. The change of "c" to "ch" before "a" didn't take place in Anglo-Norman French. And then we have all of the Norse words, which we borrowed from the Vikings, notable amongst which are the pronouns "they", "them" and "their", and many place names. I could talk about this for ever.
 

op user

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Ok we get in a territory much liked to discuss but due to the f*9k!mg b!t6h teaching me french much disliked while studying in. French is built to be nasty. Here is a small story of two words much liked in our community: pork and weight. Pork in French is interpreted by two words one for the animal one for the meat. The reason: French invaders have the luxury of eating pork meat without farming it the poor English had to do it for them hence the reason for two different words

The weight in French is poids with a silent "d". The only reason this "d" exists is the will of the higher class to have a language inaccessible to the lower classes. Hence they added the "d" to keep the peasants from learning the language and drive students nuts.

PS. I have yet to see a class of people with such a will to create problems to other with little gain than the French female teachers. They would go to unbelievable lengths to penalize students.
 

Shotha

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Ok we get in a territory much liked to discuss but due to the f*9k!mg b!t6h teaching me french much disliked while studying in. French is built to be nasty. Here is a small story of two words much liked in our community: pork and weight. Pork in French is interpreted by two words one for the animal one for the meat. The reason: French invaders have the luxury of eating pork meat without farming it the poor English had to do it for them hence the reason for two different words.

The weight in French is poids with a silent "d". The only reason this "d" exists is the will of the higher class to have a language inaccessible to the lower classes. Hence they added the "d" to keep the peasants from learning the language and drive students nuts.

PS. I have yet to see a class of people with such a will to create problems to other with little gain than the French female teachers. They would go to unbelievable lengths to penalize students.
"Avoirdupois" has a much more interesting history than your French teachers suggested for the French word "poids". The "d" was inserted by false etymology and, maybe, a touch of snobbery.

We borrowed "avoirdupois" from the Anglo-Norman French "avoir de pois" into Middle Enlish as "avoir-de-peise". The word was changed to "avoirdepois" to follow French spelling and pronunciation. Note the lack of a "d" before the final "s", because we borrowed the word, before the French altered the spelling of "pois" to "poids".

The French word "pois" was derived from Vulgar Latin "pēsum" from Classical Latin "pēnsum" meaning "weight". The French spelling was later influence by false association with the Latin word "pondus" also meaning weight. Both of these words are derived from the Latin verb "pendere" meaning "to hang/weigh".

Finally the word "avoirdepois" was misspelled in the 1650's as "avoirdupois". This might have been due to an erroneous expectation that French should use "du" here.
 
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