FFA's with eating disorders?

Discussion in 'BHM/FFA' started by terpsichore, Nov 10, 2013.

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  1. Jan 29, 2014 #21

    halcyon

    halcyon

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    You are totally not alone on that one. I used to be anorexic and I still have a super unhealthy relationship with food yet love huge guys. Logically, it makes no sense. It leaves me CONSTANTLY second guessing myself about feeding my husband because I know how unhappy food makes me and I'd hate to be making him feel that way. He assures me that he doesn't though, but yeah.
     
  2. Feb 1, 2014 #22

    hedonistthinker

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    i always found it bizarrely erotic when a girl with a minor eating disorder/slightly underweight liking a bigger guy. i think it stem from the fact alot of the very thin women (not as in petite asian builts but underweight) have this disapproving reaction of disgust to fat men. its like an underweight woman who know she prefers fat men despite her eating disorder has an empowering relationship with herself even despite her problems.

    i think it takes a special kind of lady, even if subconsciously to look at your opposite, and admire it. on a less cerebral level, i think this i the basis of the appeal of the big guy/petite girl contrast for many of us.

    P.S hegel has invaded my perversions XD
     
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  3. Feb 1, 2014 #23

    Dex

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    Are eating orders something that one grows out of (no pun intended) as you get older? I never hear about people in their 40's having such a condition....just curious.
     
  4. Feb 1, 2014 #24

    tankyguy

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    People wrestle with minor/milder forms of their disorder their whole life. They just don't talk about it publicly and you wouldn't know it just by looking at them.

    Some people manage to get things under control as they get older. Some are forced to, because of mounting health problems.

    Sadly, some people with extremely severe disorders who never get them under control may not see 40.
     
  5. Feb 4, 2014 #25

    Melian

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    You know, I had the same question a while ago. I collaborated with a researcher who studied molecular mechanisms underlying eating disorders and some of her work overlapped with mine - she said that EDs don't tend to precipitate past the early 30's, and symptoms generally fade with age, provided that the ED was not so severe as to cause death (they normally do not reach that level).
     
  6. Feb 4, 2014 #26

    Tad

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    The great white north, eh?
    In lay speak, what would "don't tend to precipitate past the early 30's" translate to? That is, does precipitate mean start, continue, something else? (I'm presuming it doesn't mean to fall out of the sky onto people?)
     
  7. Feb 4, 2014 #27

    Yakatori

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    Hard to say, really...

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    Because I would just intuitively look at comparisons to substance-abuse. Like how addicts can develop a functionality within their compulsion to use or abuse. Like an alcoholic gravitating toward a line of work where they can be drunk most of the time or living over a bar.

    For an anorexic or bulimic or, especially, an exercise-bulimic, I would speculate that there are a good number of coping-mechanisms which might help to mitigate the noticeability of whatever condition. Things many of us wouldn't even normally conceive of without having lived with such a disorder or at least a person afflicted with it.

    So, in that way, people can certainly continue to live and appear to thrive while still enduring and being affected by all kinds of difficulty....
     
  8. Feb 5, 2014 #28

    PolarKat

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    ::GEEK MODE ENABLED::
    "don't tend to precipitate.." = will not continue to be triggered...
     
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  9. Feb 5, 2014 #29

    PolarKat

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    "don't tend to precipitate.." = will not continue to be triggered = effect does not go past.. usually something that occurs abrubtly and with a spread/diminishing effect like rain..

    Was there any progress in the study/findings?
     
  10. Feb 6, 2014 #30

    Cobra Verde

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    Damn, that's fucking hot.
     
  11. Feb 11, 2014 #31

    Melian

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    PolarKat basically got it. In psychiatric terms, "precipitate" usually refers to first incidence of disease.

    That may be the case - it's hard to get an accurate estimate, and I think they mainly use hospitalization records and psychiatrist reports to document. Basically, there are fewer self-reports of new disease emergence, fewer hospitalizations, and the patients report disease remission, to a degree. That's what she was saying, at least - I can't personally vouch for it, because I never did that research.

    I haven't spoken to this woman in ~2 years, because she changed institutions. The last time we corresponded, I advised her on some methods and possible gene targets, but am not sure what she decided to do. Should really look this up :)

    Scientists get mad pussy.
     
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