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Shotha

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As a joke, it also plays on the inability of Americans to understand English accents.

Billy Idol's speaking and singing accent is so south east England, soft 'r', flattened vowels and all!

As someone who grew up with many folks who spoke this way, in Eastern Canada, I have to think about jokes like this, because I distinctly hear Billy singing, "More, more, more", not "Mo, mo, mo" as my American friends do.

Simple example: How do you say the 'r' in Worcester? If you say it as a hard 'r', you're in Massachusetts; if you breathe it out as a soft sibilant, you're in England.
I'm from England. We pronounce "Worcester" as Wusta. Most of the place names, which end in -cester are problematic for others. Leicester is Lesta and Gloucester is Glosta.
 

DazzlingAnna

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I'm from England. We pronounce "Worcester" as Wusta. Most of the place names, which end in -cester are problematic for others. Leicester is Lesta and Gloucester is Glosta.
I grew up in GDR, for some reason we had Worcestershire sauce for some dishes.
And @Shotha: we definitely pronounced that wrong in so many ways 🤣
 

Barrett

OMG, Becky, look at his belly.
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I'm from England. We pronounce "Worcester" as Wusta. Most of the place names, which end in -cester are problematic for others. Leicester is Lesta and Gloucester is Glosta.
I've been training myself, ever since the film The Perfect Storm (where the home port of the main characters was Gloucester, Massachusetts, and they called themselves [phonetically] "Glostamen"), to pronounce those words correctly. That was when it became glaringly obvious to me that we Yanks mangle the pronunciation.

"Worcestershire" was one I definitely butchered in multiple ways growing up (my mom would coat chicken in Worcestershire sauce and roast it, and it was magnificent), and I never got it right until just recently.

(like, two minutes ago, when I read your post 🤣).

I think "Wershestershire" was the worst way. 😄
 

Shotha

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I grew up in GDR, for some reason we had Worcestershire sauce for some dishes.
And @Shotha: we definitely pronounced that wrong in so many ways 🤣
We say Wustasher sauce. The best Worcestershire sauce (the original Worcestershire sauce) is by a company called Lea & Perrins. I can't cook without it. I put it in stews, soups, meat dishes and omelettes. You can even add it to a bloody Mary.
 

squeezablysoft

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We say Wustasher sauce. The best Worcestershire sauce (the original Worcestershire sauce) is by a company called Lea & Perrins. I can't cook without it. I put it in stews, soups, meat dishes and omelettes. You can even add it to a bloody Mary.
I pronounce Worcestershire as "worster sure" and I'm sticking to it. 😋 But I do know that Lea is pronounced "lee" and not "lee uh".
 

Joker

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Clarksville TN
As a joke, it also plays on the inability of Americans to understand English accents.

Billy Idol's speaking and singing accent is so south east England, soft 'r', flattened vowels and all!

As someone who grew up with many folks who spoke this way, in Eastern Canada, I have to think about jokes like this, because I distinctly hear Billy singing, "More, more, more", not "Mo, mo, mo" as my American friends do.

Simple example: How do you say the 'r' in Worcester? If you say it as a hard 'r', you're in Massachusetts; if you breathe it out as a soft sibilant, you're in England.
I lived in Alberta for a time so my English is real messed up eh?
 

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