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Hah, I knew it! Earthquake...

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Uriel

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Hehe, it was a small one, 4.3, but I still felt it. I like the smaller ones, very soothing...



-Uriel
 

Uriel

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Man, now they are (On the News) talking about maybe a 'Big One' coming...and me on Crutches.


Grrr....


-Uriel
 

biodieselman

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Man, now they are (On the News) talking about maybe a 'Big One' coming... ...l
Not that I'm trying to frighten you or anything... :rolleyes:
but have you heard about the cluster of quakes recently in the desert south-east?


Quakes shake California's southeastern desert

Mar 25, 2009

BOMBAY BEACH, Calif. (AP) — Dozens of small earthquakes are shaking the desert of southeastern California, the day after a moderate temblor struck on the edge of the Salton Sea.

The largest of Wednesday's earthquakes was a magnitude-3.7 recorded at 12:59 p.m. and a magnitude-3.9 at 8:25 p.m. Earlier in the day, swarms of smaller ones shook the sparsely populated area 90 miles east of San Diego. A magnitude-3.5 quake struck shortly before 1 a.m.

Tuesday's magnitude-4.8 quake struck before dawn near the small town of Bombay Beach.

There have been no reports of damage or injury from any of the quakes.

Scientists are closely watching the increased earthquake activity because it is near a section of the San Andreas Fault that has not broken loose in more than 300 years.
LA Times
January 24, 2009

Large earthquakes have rumbled along a southern section of the San Andreas fault more frequently than previously believed, suggesting that Southern California could be overdue for a strong temblor on the notorious fault line, a new study has found.

I know, I know, 'the big one' is nothing to joke about.;)
 

Uriel

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Haha, thanks. Earthquakes don't scare me, and I was up here for the big one in '89. I just happen to be anything but mobile right now...Ha.
At least we don't have Tornados out here (High Fives Biodieselman...then falls over, because I dropped my crutch).


-Uriel



Not that I'm trying to frighten you or anything... :rolleyes:
but have you heard about the cluster of quakes recently in the desert south-east?







I know, I know, 'the big one' is nothing to joke about.;)
 

PamelaLois

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At least we don't have Tornados out here (High Fives Biodieselman...then falls over, because I dropped my crutch).


-Uriel
See, the thing about tornadoes is that there is maybe a .000001% (million to one) chance of my house getting hit by any single tornado that might be in the area, but there is a 100% chance of everything getting knocked around if there is an earthquake in your area. On the whole, I prefer my odds to yours.

And we don't have brushfires, mudslides or those pesky celebrities either.
 

Uriel

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See, the thing about tornadoes is that there is maybe a .000001% (million to one) chance of my house getting hit by any single tornado that might be in the area, but there is a 100% chance of everything getting knocked around if there is an earthquake in your area. On the whole, I prefer my odds to yours.

And we don't have brushfires, mudslides or those pesky celebrities either.
Yep, but we have some pretty severe Earthquake retrofitting here in San Francisco. I grew up in Arizona, with Flash Floods. now THERE is a scary natural disaster.

Credit to the NWS:

In the United States, the National Weather Service (part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) reported in 2005 that, using a national 30-year average, more people die yearly in floods (127 on average) than by lightning (73), tornadoes (65), or hurricanes (16).[4]



The desert southwestern U.S. is especially dangerous for both hikers and vehicles from the sudden onslaught of water from isolated thunderstorms. These rains fill poorly-absorbent and often clay-like dry riverbeds. A moving flood will usually be headed by a debris pile that may have wood branches and/or logs. Deep slot canyons can be especially dangerous to hikers as they may be flooded by a storm that occurs on a mesa miles away, sweeping through the canyon, making it difficult to climb up and out of the way to avoid the flood. Valley roads frequently cross dry river and creek beds without bridges. From the driver's perspective, there may be clear weather, when unexpectedly a river forms ahead of or around the vehicle in a matter of seconds.

20-30 mile an hour floods are frightening beyond belief. I've seen plenty of the in my early years, and I'll take Earthquakes over them any day.


-Uriel
 

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