How did you respond when health issues arose?

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JDavis

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People with lowest BMI have weight related problems too; higher breast cancer, nervous disorders and higher osteoporosis. Medium build get heart attacks and digestive problems. It's kind of like breeds of dogs...different ones get different diseases.

I like the ayurvedic model which divides people into 3 categories of weight, high, medium, low fat free mass index. Each category has it's medical challenges. The current US and British medical profession is just hounding on Kapfa (high FFMI, High BMI) right now.
 
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JDavis

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Doesn't excess weight exacerbate health problems and put people at a higher risk of getting them in the first place, though?
I just read an interesting newer study about BMI and diabetes. They admitted, that while people with higher BMIs are more likely to get diabetes, the BMI is not the cause of the diabetes. The new model is that some people store fat in their pancreas at a certain weight and they need to stay below that weight to keep a healthy pancreas. That weight/BMI varies from diabetes patient to patient. Not everyone starts storing fat in their pancreas at any BMI/weight. I think this is a much more realistic way of saying a disease is weight related. It can be for some but not for everyone.

My dad is super skinny and has diabetes so I never bought their model until now.

Here is the study in case you are interested : https://www.ncl.ac.uk/media/wwwnclacuk/newcastlemagneticresonancecentre/files/Translating aetiological insight into sustainable management of T2D.pdf
 

loopytheone

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I just read an interesting newer study about BMI and diabetes. They admitted, that while people with higher BMIs are more likely to get diabetes, the BMI is not the cause of the diabetes. The new model is that some people store fat in their pancreas at a certain weight and they need to stay below that weight to keep a healthy pancreas. That weight/BMI varies from diabetes patient to patient. Not everyone starts storing fat in their pancreas at any BMI/weight. I think this is a much more realistic way of saying a disease is weight related. It can be for some but not for everyone.

My dad is super skinny and has diabetes so I never bought their model until now.

Here is the study in case you are interested : https://www.ncl.ac.uk/media/wwwnclacuk/newcastlemagneticresonancecentre/files/Translating aetiological insight into sustainable management of T2D.pdf
Thank you posting this and the link. Very interesting area of research.
 

extra_m13

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it would be great if more people came to this thread and comment on it, being really heavy is a unique experience i am sure
 
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I'm having some drama in this area at the moment.
My doctor is having hysterics about my BMI (about 30) and has had me have some tests (a resting metabolic rate test, which I don't think was accurate because it showed me having a 'fast' metabolism... not at all what I have observed) and a body fat scan (which showed I have a lot of body fat. Duh).
I am not really worried about those things. I'm more worried about blood tests that show systemic inflammation, and about some musculoskeletal issues that are causing chronic pain and limiting my ability to exercise (although my osteoarthritis in my lower back actually doesn't feel worse with weight gain).
I really, really do not want to get back on the self-hatred, self-deprivation roller coaster of dieting. I also don't really like or trust this doctor (my specialists are fine but this is my primary doctor) but I live in an area where there are few choices.
I also don't want to have more pain or discomfort or die young (even though at the moment the world seems to be going to hell in a handbasket which is having an effect on my will to live).
Frustrating!
(forgot to mention: from an aesthetic/personal point of view I do not want to lose weight. I wonder what the doc's expression would be if I just told him that. lol)
 
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loopytheone

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That sucks. But honestly, I've seen your posts before and you're around the same height as me and about 40 lbs lighter than I am and honestly, I don't have any weight-related health problems at all. A BMI of 30 is right on the borderline of being medically obese but a lot of studies have shown people with a BMI 25-30 have a longer life expectancy than people with an 'ideal' BMI.

I know you say you don't have a lot of choice but I would absolutely try and find another doctor if possible, this one clearly isn't going to give you the medical care and attention you need. Having trust in a doctor is really important as well and if you don't like/trust them then it isn't worth seeing them. Do you live in a place where you pay for medical care, by any chance? Because the metabolic rate test and body fat scan are completely unneccessary and wouldn't show anything useful anyway. It seems like they are trying to scare monger you into having tests/procedures so they can make more money.

I also used to do the dieting, self hatred type stuff and not matter what anybody says, it is never okay to go there ever again. Your priority needs to be to stay out of those mental traps; it is far healthier to be a happy fat person that looks after themselves than to be a thin person that is miserable and starves their body. Yo-yo dieting or repeated weight loss/gain tends to be much much harder on the body than just being fat and stable. As we get older, nutrient deficiencies and stuff become harder and harder for the body to cope with as well.

It's a huge cliche, but I'm a big believer that healthy lifestyle choices are the best things for everyone. Eat lots of vegetables, drink enough fluids, sleep, exercise in ways that are positive/beneficial for you. Some people do this and end up 100 lbs and some people end up 250 lbs, weight isn't a good indicator of health. My BMI is almost 40, and I'm a vegan that exercises regularly. Healthy looks different on different people and if your doctor can't understand that then they aren't going to offer appropriate medical care.
 
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Sidhuriel

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I have had health issues all my life, even when I was in the normal weight category. I have several autoimmune diseases and they were already there before I got fat.

So being 'healthy' is something I never experienced, I've always had this that or the other. Some doctors are quick to blame my weight by now, but it's not a root cause. Rather a result of inflammation, taking steroids for years, and resulting hormonal issues. They tend to tell you everything gets better if you just lose weight, but correlation does not equal causation and in my case for example 'getting healthy' will not happen. Also the reduction in health risks is largely overblown, if you have *one* autoimmune condition you are already at risk of lots of other complications, let alone having multiple of them as I do. Losing weight won't change any of that, so I am not trying to accomplish it.
 

Tracyarts

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Another factor I only touched briefly on in my previous response is how being at a higher weight makes it more difficult to diagnose, treat, and manage some health problems.

I'm not losing weight to be more "healthy" per se, it's more for physical comfort, mobility improvement, and greater access to healthcare resources and assistive devices.

At 400+ pounds, even in Houston TX, home of one of the largest concentrations of state of the art hospitals and other medical facilities on the planet, I have had trouble finding accessible healthcare. It seems like 250-300 pounds is the cutoff to pretty much being guaranteed access to everything I might need, so my goal weight is in that range. Basically, I need to be able to fit on life flight, and into the MRI or catscan loading table at any hospital I end up being transported to in case of another major medical crisis.

It's partly a physical accessibility issue. Imaging equipment and loading tables cannot accommodate patients over a certain weight or dimension. And partly an issue with limitations of current technology. Imaging scans lose definition after penetrating a certain amount of body tissue and can't be relied on to give an accurate diagnosis.

When I have my brain scans, it's just a matter of finding imaging suites with machines that can accommodate my weight and body dimensions. But when I needed heart and lung scans, the doctor couldn't get the amount of definition needed in the images because there was just too thick of a layer of fat on my chest for the equipment to penetrate properly. So the doctor had to make the most educated guess he could with the amount of information he was able to gather.

Should hospital equipment be accessible and effective to all? Of course. But the reality is that it's not. And it may be a long time before it is. So in the meantime, do I change my body to conform to the limitations of what's currently available? Or hope that nothing happens to me before things change?

I ended up having a potentially life-ending medical emergency in 2017 and being taken to a hospital that could not accommodate my body and could not perform diagnostic procedures. And without an accurate diagnosis, I could not be transported to a larger hospital that could accommodate me for further evaluation.

I'm not ready to accept death as an inevitability yet, so I'm doing what I can to ensure that I can get the best diagnosis and treatment possible.
 

TwoSwords

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I once had high blood pressure. It led me to a 3-month-long study of illness and what's required for good health (a very frustrating topic of study,) which concluded in me going for walks more often, and cutting down my intake of refined sugar to almost nothing. I lost maybe 4 lbs, but the high blood pressure issue resolved itself anyway. I think most health concerns have practical solutions like that.
 

Sidhuriel

Cooking Queen
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Apr 22, 2019
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I once had high blood pressure. It led me to a 3-month-long study of illness and what's required for good health (a very frustrating topic of study,) which concluded in me going for walks more often, and cutting down my intake of refined sugar to almost nothing. I lost maybe 4 lbs, but the high blood pressure issue resolved itself anyway. I think most health concerns have practical solutions like that.
Yeah definitely, health at every size is a good starting point. Some behaviours are just healthy across all weights, and cutting sugar (if you want to) is a healthy thing to do for anyone.
 
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