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biodieselman

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Is anybody acquainted with this technology?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXMUmby8PpU

I've got a lot of big, older trees in my yard that shed limbs like crazy, especially in the winter months. It would be great to be able to use them on the soil (or the garden I'm planning on starting in the spring) instead od sending them to a landfill.

I remember reading about this when I was first thinking about gardening. OMG! It's been decades when I first read about this! It's a great idea if your soil is acidic. Increasing soil ph above 7 will cause nutrients such as phosphorus, iron, boron, manganese, copper, zinc and potassium to become chemically tied to the soil and less available for plant use. I would take small soil samples from various spots where you're planning to start a garden & have it tested before using wood ashes as a soil amendment.

I have a problem common to arid climates, alkaline soil. By the time the Colorado River reaches southern California many dissolved salts have accumulated, making our water very hard, which increases the alkalinity of my soil. Many sugar pines were planted in our housing track which shed heavily just when our weather starts to turn hot. I sweep up their abundant pine needles from the streets to use a free garden mulch. The neighbors think I'm nuts.;) But hey... it's free! My garden soil benefits from the increased acidity of the needles.

If using wood ashes will benefit your soil, please post pictures. It'd be great to show by your example, how individuals can sequester carbon at home.
 

Hozay J Garseeya

Rooder. Crooder. Neuter.
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hozaygarseeya,
I read the very first post in this thread, and although I do feel it is a bit insignificant, I feel I'm doing the little that I can right now.

I spent a weekend building a 6'x3' planter box and planted some vegetable and fruit and looking to see where it goes. It's nice to not have to depend on a grocery store, even if it is just for a few things. So I have a little garden going on in an apartment.

here are some pictures.

this is all the lumber at home in the living room.
Project01.jpg

these are the two side panels.
Project05.jpg

these are the front and side panels put together.
Project08.jpg

this was the box after adding the base boards.
Project10.jpg

I'm always proud of my accomplishments.
Project12.jpg

and lastly, my crops so far.
Project13.jpg
 

Ho Ho Tai

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I read the very first post in this thread, and although I do feel it is a bit insignificant, I feel I'm doing the little that I can right now.

Hozay, I'd be proud to build a box like that, whether as a planter, a composter, or even a coffin. Our efforts have been limited to a few tomatoes and peppers in outdoor planters. Most wound up feeding the squirrels and raccoons, then we would be off to the farmers' market

But I'm reminded of the brave naivete of Candide, as they set out to make their garden grow. I can get teary-eyed listening to it.

CANDIDE
You've been a fool
And so have I,
But come and be my wife.
And let us try,
Before we die,
To make some sense of life.
We're neither pure, nor wise, nor good
We'll do the best we know.
We'll build our house and chop our wood
And make our garden grow...
And make our garden grow.

CUNEGONDE
I thought the world
Was sugar cake
For so our master said.
But, now I'll teach
My hands to bake
Our loaf of daily bread.

CANDIDE AND CUNEGONDE
We're neither pure, nor wise, nor good
We'll do the best we know.
We'll build our house and chop our wood
And make our garden grow...
And make our garden grow.

(ensemble enters in gardening gear and a cow walks on)

CANDIDE, CUNEGONDE, MAXIMILLIAN, PAQUETTE, OLD LADY, DR. PANGLOSS
Let dreamers dream
What worlds they please
Those Edens can't be found.
The sweetest flowers,
The fairest trees
Are grown in solid ground.

ENSEMBLE (a cappella)
We're neither pure, nor wise, nor good
We'll do the best we know.
We'll build our house and chop our wood
And make our garden grow.
And make our garden grow!
 

Ernest Nagel

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Anybody acquainted with this technology (Magnesium Energy Cycle)? http://inventorspot.com/articles/japan_magnesium_energy_cycle_5887

I've been soaking up all the available research on mycodiesel and feel like I've kinda gotten blind to other promising developments. What else is out there lurking just beneath the viable horizon? :confused:

BTW thanks for the tip re checking soil acidity before adding wood ash, Bio. Unfortunately my soil Ph is near perfect as is so the technology would have no value for me. :(
 

steely

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I read the very first post in this thread, and although I do feel it is a bit insignificant, I feel I'm doing the little that I can right now.

I spent a weekend building a 6'x3' planter box and planted some vegetable and fruit and looking to see where it goes. It's nice to not have to depend on a grocery store, even if it is just for a few things. So I have a little garden going on in an apartment.

here are some pictures.

this is all the lumber at home in the living room.
Project01.jpg

these are the two side panels.
Project05.jpg

these are the front and side panels put together.
Project08.jpg

this was the box after adding the base boards.
Project10.jpg

I'm always proud of my accomplishments.
Project12.jpg

and lastly, my crops so far.
Project13.jpg

This is very impressive! Come back and post pictures when you harvest, please. I love to grow things. :smitten:
 

biodieselman

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... BTW thanks for the tip re checking soil acidity before adding wood ash, Bio. Unfortunately my soil Ph is near perfect as is so the technology would have no value for me. :(

Glad to be of assistance S. If you have an abundance of tree trimmings, have you considered a wood chipper/shredder? They dramatically reduce the volume of tree trimmings & of course can be used as mulch or brown material for a compost heap. One word of advice, don't go cheap as I did. An electric chipper is grossly underpowered, making they essentially useless.



Although I work in the HVAC field, I've done almost everything practical to avoid using our gas fired heater & air conditioner. My children are grown & there is not great need to keep the house warm all of the time. Since we spend most of our time in the living room, we heat the room with the fireplace. Ris loves a nice warm fire.;)

DSCN4293.jpg


On cold nights, Ris dresses warmly:( & you can see her pile of blankets on the couch. I'll light a fire on the colder nights & first thing in the morning on weekends. Occasionally we get a cold/rainy spell, (hey... it's Los Angeles, it can rain:rolleyes:), & I have a fire for most of the day.

As I'm sure you know, the problem is that all of the heat is concentrated in the room with the fireplace. I place a small fan on the floor at the end of the hallway from the bedrooms & aim the discharge towards the fireplace. The small fan is sufficient motive force to create a convection loop sucking cold air from the bedrooms, forcing heated air into the rest of the house. I keep the spare bedroom doors closed, as well as the door to the den. I also leave the ash clean-out door open in the floor of the fireplace. The ash clean-out door on the outside of the house is held cracked open with bricks for combustion air. I'm trying to prevent cold outside air from being sucked into the house as make-up air for combustion.

We burn a cord of wood per year. This year our wood came from the cut down almond orchards of central California. The EPA stopped sending irrigation water to thousands of farms causing many farmers to cut down productive fruit trees & many fields were left fallow due to no water for irrigation. Few realize how much of the nation's food is produced in California.

DSCN4291.jpg

All of our windows were replaced with double-glazed Hi-E windows. We also have plantation shutters covering the windows. The three dead air spaces created between the screen, double glazed window & the shutters makes a huge difference in the heat of summer & the dead of winter that we can see in our lower utility bills.

DSCN4297.jpg

A guy has to keep a woman warm & happy in the wintertime.:wubu: Oh yeah... and Bubbles too.;)
Don't tell her that I like the low gas bills.:D
 

PatrickThomas

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This is a good thread and we are doing all these kind of steps to practically applying all those ecofriendly life style which is needed to survive in this hazardous environment.
_________________________________________________
wrapping supplies ~ Good things come in small packages ~
 

Ernest Nagel

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Just thought this was a cool site. I ordered the shampoo and conditioner bars.

http://pluckfastic.org/

Great post, Chuck! Living alone I just heat my bedroom and office most of the time. I use little radiant oil heaters with timers and they keep those rooms around 68 while the rest of the house is 62. My heating bill is less than half of what the previous occupants was.

My yard guy uses a chipper and all the output gets used as mulch wherever needed. :bow:
 

Ho Ho Tai

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Although I work in the HVAC field, I've done almost everything practical to avoid using our gas fired heater & air conditioner. My children are grown & there is not great need to keep the house warm all of the time. Since we spend most of our time in the living room, we heat the room with the fireplace. Ris loves a nice warm fire.;)

DSCN4293.jpg


On cold nights, Ris dresses warmly:( & you can see her pile of blankets on the couch. I'll light a fire on the colder nights & first thing in the morning on weekends. Occasionally we get a cold/rainy spell, (hey... it's Los Angeles, it can rain:rolleyes:), & I have a fire for most of the day.

As I'm sure you know, the problem is that all of the heat is concentrated in the room with the fireplace. I place a small fan on the floor at the end of the hallway from the bedrooms & aim the discharge towards the fireplace. The small fan is sufficient motive force to create a convection loop sucking cold air from the bedrooms, forcing heated air into the rest of the house. I keep the spare bedroom doors closed, as well as the door to the den. I also leave the ash clean-out door open in the floor of the fireplace. The ash clean-out door on the outside of the house is held cracked open with bricks for combustion air. I'm trying to prevent cold outside air from being sucked into the house as make-up air for combustion.

We burn a cord of wood per year.

DSCN4297.jpg

A guy has to keep a woman warm & happy in the wintertime.:wubu: Oh yeah... and Bubbles too.;)
Don't tell her that I like the low gas bills.:D

BDMan (you too, Risible)

In my previous existence (prior to Mrs Ho Ho) my former wife and I lived in a single story 1100 sq. ft. ranch style, with full basement and forced air / gas heat. We had a couple of fireplaces (one up, one down) which both looked much like yours. A few years after we moved in, I got into cutting and splitting my own firewood. I had a Jonsered 80, along with the usual assortment of hand saws, axes, sledges and wedges.
cut114.jpg

I bought that thing in 1974. It had a 16" bar, which was fine for my needs. My son has it now and has put a 30" bar on it. Still works great.

I cut and split 2 -3 farmer cords a year, burning it more for recreation than for heat. After a bit, I put glass doors and a heat exchanger on the upstairs fireplace. With the furnace fan running to circulate the heat, I could keep the whole house in the 60 deg. range, with the outside temp. around zero.

Ah, those were the days.

Obviously, Risible hasn't reached 'the change' yet, or she wouldn't need all those blankets. Mrs Ho Ho . . . well, I told her that I was going to stand her in the corner, turn a fan on her, and feed her corn pellets. Wouldn't need the furnace at all.

So, you're a HVAC guy. This story may interest you - maybe a business connection.

I guess that also explains all that hot air coming from Hyde Park.

PureChoice in Burnsville has Nose for business
Company is marketing its air-quality sensors to track heating and cooling, boosting clients' energy efficiency and its sales.
 

stan_der_man

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Bio, I've been meaning to ask you this... When the oak tree fell into our back yard it obliterated most of our trees including the apple tree, which is now reduced to a stump and a series of offshoots which were cut off. Can apple trees regenerate from their trunks / roots and if so is their a good way of encouraging regrowth?
 

fat hiker

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Bio, I've been meaning to ask you this... When the oak tree fell into our back yard it obliterated most of our trees including the apple tree, which is now reduced to a stump and a series of offshoots which were cut off. Can apple trees regenerate from their trunks / roots and if so is their a good way of encouraging regrowth?

Hi Stan,

The quick answer to your question is, yes, apple trees can regenerate from their roots. But, you don't want them to, as what you will get is NOT the tree that was there before. If the sprouts are coming from the trunk above the ground however, you will get the same tree.

The reason that regenerating from below the ground is not what you want is that, excepting for wild apple trees grown from seeds, apple trees never grow on their own roots - at least, not apple trees with apples that you want to eat. Nearly all eating apples - from Macintosh to Granny Smith to Cox Orange Pippin - have quite weak root systems. Plus, a full-size conventional apple tree can grow to 60 feet tall!

To both have a stronger root system, and keep the trees down to a more manageable height, nearly all apple trees are grafts onto a 'dwarfing' rootstock. The rootstock (the part of the tree underground) is selected for disease resistance, toughness and limited size, and then the top of a desired apple tree is grafted - joined - on. On some apple trees the graft is underground, but usually it is a bump or swelling just above the ground. This bump is quite obvious on young trees, but on old trees may be nearly invisible.

So, if you're getting sprouting from the trunk, encourage and cherish it, but if the sprouts are coming from underground or below the grafting bump, keep cutting them off - unless you only want the tree as an ornament, and don't intend to eat the apples. (Apples from the trees used for rooting stock tend to be small, rock hard and bitter.)
 

biodieselman

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I read the very first post in this thread, and although I do feel it is a bit insignificant, I feel I'm doing the little that I can right now. ...

There's no reason to feel the least bit insignificant Hozay, we all try to do what we can. There's no single solution that fits everyone needs. I commend you for your efforts.:bow:

I'm sure we all would enjoy to see what you're planting this spring.

Bio, I've been meaning to ask you this... ... Can apple trees regenerate from their trunks / roots and if so is their a good way of encouraging regrowth?

I'm afraid FH is right Stan. It would be better to plant another tree for several reasons. I would be very surprised if your apple tree wasn't a grafted tree. The scion, or fruiting tissue, rarely has a strong, vigorous rooting system. Root stocks are selected for their superior vigor & disease resistance.

From last year's description, I suspect that either the root stock has taken over or, at minimum, the tree has been abandoned for several years. An apple tree that hasn't properly pruned for years will develop intertwining branches & the fruiting crop will diminish in size & quality. The overtaking root stock will also yield smaller, less desirable fruit.

Either way, it would take 2-4 years of knowledgeable pruning to nurse an abandoned tree back to reasonable production. But a tree that has suffered this much damage, IMO, isn't worth the risk or effort. Sorry, Stan, it's a do-over.

Changing the subject...

I've been experimenting on methods of increasing my biodiesel yields. I increased the catalyst & I made a 120 gallon mistake. I made 120 gal of liquid hand soap that smells like Indian food. Talk about do-over!!!

This is a photo looking down into the main reaction vessel.
crying.gif


DSCN4321.jpg



I save all of the circuit boards I replace from work, batteries, old electronic devices, etc., etc. I recently made another trip to the nearby Hazardous Waste Roundup that our city puts on quarterly. I took my camera to photograph the big production of people sorting the various hazardous materials, but there were so many cars in line & the line moved so fast, I didn't have time to take photos.

You guys do dispose of your toxic, hazardous waste old electronics in a responsible manner... right?;)

DSCN4323.jpg

It's spring time & we've have a lot of rain in the desert regions of Southern California. Here are some photos taken recently near Borrego Springs following Coyote Creek in Coyote Canyon. It's unbelievable to picture this much vegetation if you could see how sparse this place is during the oppressive summer temperatures. Seeing the desert during daylight is very deceiving. The bright sun washes out the colors that photos can't do justice. There's lots of wildlife you don't see, bighorn sheep, coyotes, bats, insects, kangaroo rats, many birds, not to mention snakes & lizards & more. They come out at night!!! You can only truly appreciate the marvels of the desert first hand.


DSCN4397.jpg


CopyofDSCN4371.jpg


DSCN4399.jpg


DSCN4404.jpg


DSCN4390.jpg
 

stan_der_man

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Thank you Fat Hiker and Mr. Bio for the apple tree information!

Also, beautiful pics Bio! A student from the Physics Dept. was recently at Joshua Tree and said that the desert out that direction was also awash in colorful, blooming flora. If you are thinking of making another trip out to the desert within the next few weeks, we should make it a joint trip!
 

fat hiker

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It's spring time & we've have a lot of rain in the desert regions of Southern California. .....
The bright sun washes out the colors that photos can't do justice.

Fabulous photos, biodieselman.

If you find the bright sun washes out the colours, one solution that is still as useful in the digital age as it was in the age of film is a polarising filter - get a "circular" polarising filter to keep your digital camera happy.

The other solution is to play with the white balance, to reduce the amount of blue and white in your photos. Each camera does this differently, so it takes a bit of figuring to get those colours to 'pop'.

With film, I'd also use a UV filter, but those don't make much difference with digital CCDs, IIRC.
 

Ho Ho Tai

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This article appeared in a concatenator service. I traced it back to what I believe it the original. I'm more-or-less a mathematician (retired) but my head was swimming after a few pages. Read it and post your interpretation. Should we stock up on gasoline and biodiesel, or Kool-Aid?

From The Intelligence Daily

The Imminent Crash Of The Oil Supply: What Is Going To Happen And How It Came To Pass That We Weren’t Forewarned

April 23, 2010

By Nicholas C. Arguimbau
 

fat hiker

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This article appeared in a concatenator service. I traced it back to what I believe it the original. I'm more-or-less a mathematician (retired) but my head was swimming after a few pages. Read it and post your interpretation. Should we stock up on gasoline and biodiesel, or Kool-Aid?

From The Intelligence Daily

The Imminent Crash Of The Oil Supply: What Is Going To Happen And How It Came To Pass That We Weren’t Forewarned

April 23, 2010

By Nicholas C. Arguimbau

It's good analysis of the military's report, but some basic economics and human psychology has been ignored too. Particularly that upward arching demand line on the top of the graph - there's a whole host of unchallenged assumptions in that line! A few quickies - if an item gets to be in short supply, its price goes up, and if the price of something goes up, then you either use less of it or find a substitute. This is as true of petroleum as anything else - true, for some functions, it's hard to substitute for oil, but if the 'price is right' it can be done.

Electric cars instead of gas burning ones is an easy example, but so is diesel fuel made from natural gas (already being demonstrated), various biofuels (wood waste into alcohol, anyone?), better insulation to cope with rising heating costs (your house), even deployment of new technologies (extracting the tar sands takes a lot of energy, currently met by burning oil and natural gas - but all they need is heat, so using nuclear reactors for that is now being planned). While those curves looks nice and definitive, reality is a messy beast - the current economic recession has put off their day of reckoning by a few years, as it has both reduced oil demand and caused many folks to become more efficient all at once. I'd invest in energy conservation, for the sake of your budget, and then in both oil companies and in alternative energy, but choose those companies who are planning ahead...
 

Ho Ho Tai

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It's good analysis of the military's report, but some basic economics and human psychology has been ignored too. Particularly that upward arching demand line on the top of the graph - there's a whole host of unchallenged assumptions in that line! A few quickies - if an item gets to be in short supply, its price goes up, and if the price of something goes up, then you either use less of it or find a substitute. This is as true of petroleum as anything else - true, for some functions, it's hard to substitute for oil, but if the 'price is right' it can be done.

Electric cars instead of gas burning ones is an easy example, but so is diesel fuel made from natural gas (already being demonstrated), various biofuels (wood waste into alcohol, anyone?), better insulation to cope with rising heating costs (your house), even deployment of new technologies (extracting the tar sands takes a lot of energy, currently met by burning oil and natural gas - but all they need is heat, so using nuclear reactors for that is now being planned). While those curves looks nice and definitive, reality is a messy beast - the current economic recession has put off their day of reckoning by a few years, as it has both reduced oil demand and caused many folks to become more efficient all at once. I'd invest in energy conservation, for the sake of your budget, and then in both oil companies and in alternative energy, but choose those companies who are planning ahead...

. . . and the sort of thing I'd much rather believe.

I received a rep message on that post and decided that a modified version would serve as a response here as well.

You said "I'm glad I'm old". Yeah - even older than my wife (by a year), but 20 years younger than me (next October.) I'm not worried about me, Mrs Ho Ho, or even my kids (in their 40s.) But here comes a whole bunch of grandkids. Will they live in a Mad Max / Road Warrior / Waterworld dystopia? (No, I've never seen any of these, or the others in the list. Read a few sci-fi versions, long ago.)

But after I posted that, I got around to reading a portion of this SciAm article from Nov. 2009. You can get the first few paragraphs here or at this link. http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...energy-by-2030

Who and what to believe? Pie in the sky, or mud pie in your face? I think I'll still keep a bit of Kool-Aid around.
 

Ernest Nagel

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Thoughts for food.

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/04/26/attention_whole_foods_shoppers?page=0,3

Attention Whole Foods Shoppers
Stop obsessing about arugula. Your "sustainable" mantra -- organic, local, and slow -- is no recipe for saving the world's hungry millions.
BY ROBERT PAARLBERG | MAY/JUNE 2010

Not only is organic farming less friendly to the environment than assumed, but modern conventional farming is becoming significantly more sustainable. High-tech farming in rich countries today is far safer for the environment, per bushel of production, than it was in the 1960s, when Rachel Carson criticized the indiscriminate farm use of DDT in her environmental classic, Silent Spring. Thanks in part to Carson's devastating critique, that era's most damaging insecticides were banned and replaced by chemicals that could be applied in lower volume and were less persistent in the environment. Chemical use in American agriculture peaked soon thereafter, in 1973. This was a major victory for environmental advocacy.

And it was just the beginning of what has continued as a significant greening of modern farming in the United States. Soil erosion on farms dropped sharply in the 1970s with the introduction of "no-till" seed planting, an innovation that also reduced dependence on diesel fuel because fields no longer had to be plowed every spring. Farmers then began conserving water by moving to drip irrigation and by leveling their fields with lasers to minimize wasteful runoff. In the 1990s, GPS equipment was added to tractors, autosteering the machines in straighter paths and telling farmers exactly where they were in the field to within one square meter, allowing precise adjustments in chemical use. Infrared sensors were brought in to detect the greenness of the crop, telling a farmer exactly how much more (or less) nitrogen might be needed as the growing season went forward. To reduce wasteful nitrogen use, equipment was developed that can insert fertilizers into the ground at exactly the depth needed and in perfect rows, only where it will be taken up by the plant roots.

These "precision farming" techniques have significantly reduced the environmental footprint of modern agriculture relative to the quantity of food being produced. In 2008, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development published a review of the "environmental performance of agriculture" in the world's 30 most advanced industrial countries -- those with the most highly capitalized and science-intensive farming systems. The results showed that between 1990 and 2004, food production in these countries continued to increase (by 5 percent in volume), yet adverse environmental impacts were reduced in every category. The land area taken up by farming declined 4 percent, soil erosion from both wind and water fell, gross greenhouse gas emissions from farming declined 3 percent, and excessive nitrogen fertilizer use fell 17 percent. Biodiversity also improved, as increased numbers of crop varieties and livestock breeds came into use.

Seeding the Future

Africa faces a food crisis, but it's not because the continent's population is growing faster than its potential to produce food, as vintage Malthusians such as environmental advocate Lester Brown and advocacy organizations such as Population Action International would have it. Food production in Africa is vastly less than the region's known potential, and that is why so many millions are going hungry there. African farmers still use almost no fertilizer; only 4 percent of cropland has been improved with irrigation; and most of the continent's cropped area is not planted with seeds improved through scientific plant breeding, so cereal yields are only a fraction of what they could be. Africa is failing to keep up with population growth not because it has exhausted its potential, but instead because too little has been invested in reaching that potential.

One reason for this failure has been sharply diminished assistance from international donors. When agricultural modernization went out of fashion among elites in the developed world beginning in the 1980s, development assistance to farming in poor countries collapsed. Per capita food production in Africa was declining during the 1980s and 1990s and the number of hungry people on the continent was doubling, but the U.S. response was to withdraw development assistance and simply ship more food aid to Africa. Food aid doesn't help farmers become more productive -- and it can create long-term dependency. But in recent years, the dollar value of U.S. food aid to Africa has reached 20 times the dollar value of agricultural development assistance.

The alternative is right in front of us. Foreign assistance to support agricultural improvements has a strong record of success, when undertaken with purpose. In the 1960s, international assistance from the Rockefeller Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and donor governments led by the United States made Asia's original Green Revolution possible. U.S. assistance to India provided critical help in improving agricultural education, launching a successful agricultural extension service, and funding advanced degrees for Indian agricultural specialists at universities in the United States. The U.S. Agency for International Development, with the World Bank, helped finance fertilizer plants and infrastructure projects, including rural roads and irrigation. India could not have done this on its own -- the country was on the brink of famine at the time and dangerously dependent on food aid. But instead of suffering a famine in 1975, as some naysayers had predicted, India that year celebrated a final and permanent end to its need for food aid.

Foreign assistance to farming has been a high-payoff investment everywhere, including Africa. The World Bank has documented average rates of return on investments in agricultural research in Africa of 35 percent a year, accompanied by significant reductions in poverty. Some research investments in African agriculture have brought rates of return estimated at 68 percent. Blind to these realities, the United States cut its assistance to agricultural research in Africa 77 percent between 1980 and 2006.

When it comes to Africa's growing hunger, governments in rich countries face a stark choice: They can decide to support a steady new infusion of financial and technical assistance to help local governments and farmers become more productive, or they can take a "worry later" approach and be forced to address hunger problems with increasingly expensive shipments of food aid. Development skeptics and farm modernization critics keep pushing us toward this unappealing second path. It's time for leaders with vision and political courage to push back.

GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images
 

biodieselman

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Spring is here, the soil is warming & the nights are getting warm. The race is on & soon the garden will soon be yielding summer's abundance.


The strawberries are producing a few berries . Sequoia strawberries bear heaviest in late spring & early summer.
DSCN4438.jpg


The Better Boy tomatoes are already setting fruit. We also have planted Big Beef, Sweet 100, Red Lightening, Yellow Pear, Striped German, Japanese Black Trifele & a Sweet Seedless.
DSCN4440.jpg

DSCN4441.jpg


You may see last years Jalapeno in the middle row that has survived winter on the support pole that is leaning over. You can't see them but we have two more variety of peeper seedlings patiently waiting for hot weather. Were getting Romain lettuce which is tucked under the bougainvillea & escaped blackberries, to the right of the Asian pear tree.

DSCN4443.jpg

Soon we'll have zucchini & we also have two other varieties behind these. Last year Ris sprouted an Indian Blanket, (first year this perennial has flowered), & to its right a zinnia.
DSCN4445.jpg

DSCN4446.jpg

We should have a heavy grape yield this year. Last we had a lost of overcast weather & the grapes got attacked by powdery mildew. This year I sprayed them with sulfur & they look great! I weave the vines through the lattice to create shade & privacy for a little sitting room out front.

DSCN4455.jpg

DSCN4456.jpg


We planted several new fruit trees last year & I think we'll soon be eating nectarines.
DSCN4453.jpg
 

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