Loop in America

Discussion in 'BHM/FFA' started by loopytheone, Mar 15, 2017.

  1. May 31, 2017 #101

    djudex

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    They're just crumpets, I don't know why they changed the name, crumpet sounds much better!
     
  2. Jun 1, 2017 #102

    Dr. Feelgood

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    To me, 'crumpet' sounds like a Fiat that lost an argument with a semi. :eek:
     
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  3. Jun 1, 2017 #103

    Tad

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    The great white north, eh?
    An english muffin is not a crumpet! At least around here it isn't -- crumpets are full of holes on top, english muffin is more bread-like, usually split in half to be consumed while crumpets are done in one piece.
     
  4. Jun 1, 2017 #104

    Xyantha Reborn

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    I don't think I have ever had a crumpet and i feel like that should be remediated at some point... i don't think i have ever seen one!
     
  5. Jun 1, 2017 #105

    djudex

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    English muff

    [​IMG]

    Crumpet

    [​IMG]

    Seems pretty close to me. Yeah you split one in half and the other comes naturally cratered on top but pretty much samies.
     
  6. Jun 1, 2017 #106

    dwesterny

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    I've had crumpets and they were quite different from English muffins. Crumpets taste almost like pancakes, moist and sweet. Not at all like English muffins which are basically bread.
     
  7. Jun 1, 2017 #107

    agouderia

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    It's not French - it's just the North American name for an age old recipe dating back to Roman times for using up leftover bread.

    The French name is "pain perdu", the Italian "pane pavese" and in German it's "arme Ritter" - the translation of which "poor knights (of Windsor)" is actually the term you will find in traditional British English cook books.
    Somewhere down the line, the UK lost the tradition of frugal home-cooking.

    Excellent by the way is the Italian version of not doing the toast sweet, but salty with a grated Parmesan batter.
     
  8. Jun 2, 2017 #108

    HereticFA

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    I think the English muffin dough has been kneaded which develops the gluten and gives them their chewy texture compared to the crumpet.
     
  9. Jun 4, 2017 #109

    fat hiker

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    Here in Canada, the French name for 'French Toast' is 'Toast Allemande'.

    But food names change as you change regions and countries, always. Just like 'Canadian bacon' is unknown in Canada.
     
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  10. Jun 4, 2017 #110

    FreeThinker

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    Never heard that name for French Toast around the Golden Triangle.

    True about the Canadian Bacon. Around here it's usually called peameal bacon or peameal ham. I'm not sure if it's the same as back bacon.
     
  11. Jun 5, 2017 #111

    fat hiker

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    It may be a Quebec/Acadia/Eastern Ontario name, then. Acadian and Quebecois have lots of words that don't exist in 'Le Francais Internationale'.
     
  12. Jun 5, 2017 #112

    Green Eyed Fairy

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    Something truly "All-American" from McDonalds:

    [​IMG]

    An English muffin with an egg, Canadian Bacon and....American cheese :)
     
  13. Jun 5, 2017 #113

    Tad

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    The great white north, eh?
    I still don't quite understand what is meant by "American cheese." Obviously not just any cheese made in the USA (or in NA or SA!) -- I assume it is a particular type of cheese, so why such a generic name? :confused:
     
  14. Jun 5, 2017 #114

    Green Eyed Fairy

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    American cheese isn't my fave cheese- I'm more of a cheddar gal myself but I found an article that may help you understand it.


    http://www.seriouseats.com/2016/07/whats-really-in-american-cheese.html

    I do have to say though, that an ex-boyfriend showed me how to make the best grilled cheese sandwiches...with part of the secret being two slices of "real" American cheese and a cast iron skillet. Make it down my way someday Tad and I will show you how it's done :)
     
  15. Jun 6, 2017 #115

    agouderia

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    American cheese = processed food

    That's the essence also of GF's description quote. And it not only refers to Cheese Wizz

    Cheese has a clear definition. It is a natural product made of milk, salt and bacteria - period. Maybe other natural ingredients - herbs, peppers, spices - for certain specialties, but that's it.

    Now I'm not claiming that other countries don't have processed food claiming to be cheese -they all do. But the US has no indigenous cheese, "invented" and cultivated in the country.
    Of course there are specialty dairies, many of them organic that make very decent cheeses. But they're all re-building some European cheeses - like Cheddar ;-). And they play only a very limited role on the US "cheese" market.
     
  16. Jun 6, 2017 #116

    Tad

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    The great white north, eh?
    There is at least one cheese of American origin, Monterey Jack. When it first started appearing up here I thought it was another code name for a processed cheese product, but a bit of research turned up that it is fact real cheese, granted that its origins were from a Mexican monastery that ended up in California when the US took over the west.
     
  17. Jun 6, 2017 #117

    agouderia

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    See - you're contradicting yourself. ;)

    Monterey Jack is indeed the only cheese with its own real American name.

    But as you already point to its origin from Spanish monks - Monterey Jack (young) is nothing other than the emigrated brother of Mahòn respectively Manchego (old) cheese from the old world ....

    Don't argue cheese with me :rolleyes:
     
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  18. Jun 7, 2017 #118

    Tad

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    By that logic a lot of regional cheeses would lose their names, I think? Since in many cases it was the same basic cheese that changed its name as it moved between cultures.

    And when it comes to cheese, I'm far from a purist, being more of a "I like what I like" type. (I like very old cheddar from this dairy, but not from that one. Does that mean I do or don't like very old cheddar? Or is one or the other more 'authentic' than the other? I tend not to worry about such questions, and just buy the one that I know I like). So no, I won't try to argue cheese with you, not having the more formal knowledge in the field.
     
  19. Jun 7, 2017 #119

    FreeThinker

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    Yet another debate within this thread?

    Quelle fromage...
     
  20. Jun 9, 2017 #120

    LumpySmile

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    Loopy sure knows how to stir the pot, doesn't she?
     

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