Marriage by the Numbers

Discussion in 'Daily Living' started by grey1969, Jun 11, 2006.

  1. Nov 26, 2006 #81

    Adrian

    Adrian

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    Is it that he truely loves you and you only or does he find BBWs/SSBBWs attractive in general?

    My wife finds that amusing also. I can love a thin woman as a daughter, a daughter in-law, etc. but, not as a wife/lover.

    It is more of a case of adapting to new ideas and concepts rather than unlearning. As one who spent his career in "design layout" of micro circuits, unlearn is far less accurate than adjust and or evolve.
    Technology advances and one must evolve as a 'technologist' in order the progress forward. Each time there is a major change in the way engineering is done, there is a finite percentage of engineers who are not able to make the transition and withdraw or drop out of the occupation.


    Gawd..... it is a breath of fresh air!!!!!

    Adrian
     
  2. Nov 26, 2006 #82

    GeorgeNL

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    Adrian, it seems we work (or worked) in the same industry. I design analog circuits (DAC's, amplifiers, DC-DC converters, etc.), and work with layout designers that create the layout for me.
    You are certainly right, when it comes to technology, it is a matter of adapting, and most of the changes are indeed technonogy chances. But nowadays we do sometimes run into physical problems that work differently then we thought they did. So we had to throw our former ideas over board. I think of mechanisms like hot electrons that cause gate current, flicker noise in sub-threshold region (ok ok, all MOS related problems).

    I think, the basic characteristic most of us engineer share is: we're used to making errors. That sounds like we're bad engineers, but that's not what I mean. With each new innovation, we always run into new problems (or challenges) that we overlooked, due to a lack of experience. But many engineers have the patience to do things over and over again, until they finally got it right. If it went wrong for eight times, because you didn't grasp a failure mechanism interely, then a good engineer takes a deep breath and digs deeper to figure out what is going wrong. I think that is really something typical in the personality of many engineers, we do not loose our temper easily.
     
  3. Nov 27, 2006 #83

    Ho Ho Tai

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    George - for us old engineers, it even works that way in marriage. For 29 years, I was told constantly that I 'got it wrong'. Now, on the second try, Mrs Ho Ho tells me that I've pretty much got it right this time.

    But I've had one hell of a good teacher!
     
  4. Nov 28, 2006 #84

    TallFatSue

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    A little slice of life: Art & I went to a niece's wedding on Saturday. During the reception, another niece who was married last April came over and sat with us for about half an hour. At one point she complained about her husband, after only 7 or 8 months of marriage. Just the usual stuff, like he never cleans up around the house. She said, "Gee, Sue, you and Art are so good for each other. I wish I could be like you." Ya coulda knocked me over with a feather, but I recovered enough to say, "Well, first you'd need to gain about 300lb." My niece asked how she could make her husband do his share of the household chores. So I hazarded a guess, "You could try withholding sex for a while." Just then everyone else at our table suddenly found our conversation extremely interesting. "Art has kept our house spotless for 25 years." Then I overheard one cousin whisper to another, "Sue probably weighs over 400lb and I bet she has a better sex life than I do." Once the band got going, Art & I hit the dance floor for a few songs, until my feet gave out. Interesting that only a few other men danced with their wives.
     
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  5. Nov 29, 2006 #85

    Ho Ho Tai

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    TFSue -

    Normally, I find myself in complete accord with your comments, largely (no pun intended) because there are seemingly so many similarities between you and Art, and Mrs Ho Ho and I. I have a feeling that your 'withholding' comment was very much tongue-in-cheek, but around here, withholding ANY form of affection or contact is simply not in our vocabulary. Sex? Well - I am getting on in years, y'know! But the hugs and kisses abound! When things get tough and we each have way more to do than we can handle, one will say "Somebody needs a hug" and we go at it right there and then. Arms and hands do all sorts of wonderous things, but their best and highest use is for hugging.

    I wrote a bit of doggerel a while back for Mrs Ho Ho's amusement which explains how the housework gets done here:

    "In our house, the work's done by brownies.
    We pay them with hugs and with kisses.
    We leave them* around
    where they* will be found,
    And the brownies do laundry and disses.

    We're so glad the brownies chose our house,
    Though there don't seem to be very many.
    But they get the work done
    And still seem to have fun,
    And their names are [Ho Ho & Mrs Ho Ho**]

    *refers to the hugs and kisses
    **had to disguise our names, but Mrs Ho Ho's rhymes with 'many'.

    I do envy your ability to dance together. We have tried off and on for years - all sorts of styles - and the best we can do is stand in a dark corner of the ball room, arms around each other, swaying back and forth - which ain't all that bad!
     
  6. Dec 2, 2006 #86

    GeorgeNL

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    Yeah, well I follow the manual. According to this book, step one is learn to become a good friend. I'm still learning, but making progress. It's already such a big pleasure, that I don't even need step two. The only tricky thing is that you might enter the next step without even realizing.....
     
  7. Dec 2, 2006 #87

    Ho Ho Tai

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    Yeah, I have to agree with you on that, GeorgeNL. Your genes, your hormones, the desires of the body are the 'horse' that 'you' ride. Normally, that old horse plods placidly along, while you study the manual. But if the old horse gets near the barn and smell the oats (or a filly on the other side of the fence) then, hang on brother! The pages of that manual will be flying every which way, and you'll be grabbing the reins, hanging on for dear life!
     
  8. Dec 3, 2006 #88

    Adrian

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    Yes, George technologist of all types must evolve as well as other endeavors in life. The problem is that techologist it is not an option not to evolve at the first possible opportunity. You are on the cutting edge of doing something to be more efficient is what 'we' are all about, and when you no longer want to have to change anymore, it is passed time to get another profession.
    When you are young and are proving yourself, you have plenty of drive. After twenty years you have lots of experience, you can live with your faults. Unfortunately, due to changes in the way things are done today, much of your experience is no longer relevant! Plus your employer wants someone with the drive you used to have. I will never forget an article in "ELECTRONIC DESIGN Magazine" on this topic in late 1966 or early 1967 entittled, "Wanted Engineer With Twenty Years Experience -Older Men Need Not Apply!"

    My first circuit P-channel MOS was a twenty bit shift register, (a delay type circuit). It had approximated 168 transistors, the chip was a little less than one-tenth of an inch on each side, and we wondered how much more complex could it get! (SEE NOTE) My first memory circuit (in 1968) was a 64-bit RAM! (NOT 64K bits or 64M bits) My first ROM (in 1970) was 512 bits, marketing and sales people had to educate the world in how to benefit from using these circuits. The concept of a chip that contains over one hundred million transistors (like the latest Intel chips) seemed impossible.
    I was the worlds first Black "layout design draftsman" back in August of 1966! I worked for the first all MOS company and I knew who had worked at the few other micro-circuit companies.

    After reading your post, I started thinking how things have changed. I remembered back in October I went to a birthday party for one of my grandchildren and while there I saw a "Tickle Me Elmo TMX" for the first time, I was in total awh.

    I use the search engine "Dogpile", videos for Tickle Me Elmo TMX. This just one video that illustrates my point about advancement. The inexpensive electronics required to make this would have seen virtually impossible when I started in August of 1966. These videos show only a short portion of what this toy does. The "Tickle Me Elmo TMX" not only falls down in laughter (frontward and backward) but, rolls over because he is laughing so hard. The entire sequence is three to four minutes long.
    http://www.selfcasttv.com/Selfcast/playVideo.do?ref=s/84/155 OR,
    http://keyetv.com/video/?id=9146@keye.dayport.com

    I only wish the auto companies could be more efficient inproducing their products like the micro-circuit industry. Where the performance gets better and better while the cost keeps getting less!!!
    NOTE:
    Attached is a picture of the first chip I laid out back in October of 1966.

    Adrian

    MyFirstCircuit_1.jpg
     
  9. Dec 3, 2006 #89

    TallFatSue

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    Right you are! ;) Anyone who knows me even slightly, realizes that I try to defuse tense situations with humor. I'm also a firm believer in positive motivation. So, in the context of our conversation, my comment got a big laugh at our table. Art even helped it along with a perfectly-timed faux wimper! Are we a well-matched couple or what? Unfortunately the band drummer to didn't play a rim shot, but that probably would have been overkill anyway.

    However in the past week I've been kinda scared by a couple PMs and e-mails I received from men on this board who were absolutely outraged that I would make such a statement. Geeze Louise, we must have some tightly-coiled springs amongst us! One of my cousins is like that, so I need to be verrrry careful what I say in jest around her, or else she might fly off into some pretty impressive fireworks. :confused:

    Methinx I'd better lay low for a while, until the heat is off. :(

    Sue

    PS. I'm also a little bemused that this topic about marriage has morphed into a technical discussion of microchips. Whaaa...? Even at his most romantic, Art has never serenaded me with a technical discussion of electronics. (WARNING: THE PRECEDING STATEMENT WAS A JOKE! :D )
     
  10. Dec 4, 2006 #90

    Adrian

    Adrian

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    What is it Sue, you don't believe micro-circuits can evoke a passion like marriage can? Before there were geeks or nerds..... there were us "transistor heads!" A lot of good women love men like this, even my wife! LOL

    Adrian
     
  11. Dec 6, 2006 #91

    Ho Ho Tai

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    Adrian -

    Even I do not have the brass to post the same story twice in the same thread, but if you look back toward the beginning of the thread, you will find my post with the above title (Statistics and aggregates.). This is the story of romantic passion between STATISTICIANS, for gad sakes. Could anything be more nerdy, less passionate and bloodless than that? Well, follow the thread down a few more posts and you will see the awful truth.

    Micro-circuits? Transistor heads? Faugh! How about tube-heads, or even crystal-set heads? My career wound in and out around all sorts of computers, starting with an IBM 650. If you put together all the computers I have ever used, you wouldn't have the power of my wife's I-Pod.

    I've been retired for some years. I'm a house husband now - domestic engineer, if you will. I didn't quite go from vacuum tubes to vacuum cleaners, but my career spans both.
     
  12. Dec 6, 2006 #92

    Paul Fannin

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    I hope to get married again someday. Speaking for myself, I cannot imagine life's fulfillment without it. To me, marriage offers the highest happiness to which a man can aspire in this life, greater than the riches of this world.
     
  13. Dec 8, 2006 #93

    GeorgeNL

    GeorgeNL

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    WOW, that chip micrograph looks almost like a printed circuit board, very very nice. I'm indeed also a "transistor head", really thinking in transistors. Often only CMOS, but for high speed analog I can use a bipolar process as well. Bipolar are still the best transistors we have, I think, but expensive unfortunately. I work at an office of National Semiconductor, which you probably know very well. It's headquarters are close to your home.

    Technology advances fast indeed, I still have the drive to try to stay ahead, but I know as we get older, a day will come that I can only follow. At the moment though I really love this work.

    You're absolutely right, if car industry would have developed like electronic industry, it would look very different. Though now the time has come we switch from gasoline to different energy resources, I think a revolution in car industry is required.
     
  14. Dec 17, 2006 #94

    Ho Ho Tai

    Ho Ho Tai

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    And YET another 'how we met' story . . .this one cribbed from our local Star/Tribune. I'm posting a fragment and a link to the rest of the story (copyrights, y'know). Access is free

    "But the best of show, hands-down, goes to Emily Lodine, 51, and Gary Overgaard, 54, of tiny Magnolia, in southwestern Minnesota. In 1992, the two were seated together on an airplane. Overgaard, a farmer heading to Denmark to visit a sprayer factory, had smashed all 6-foot-7 of himself into the middle seat. Worse, he quickly learned that "that broad" sitting next to him was an opera singer from Chicago heading to London for auditions. He turned to his buddy sitting in the window seat and mumbled, "This is going to be the worst flight of my life."

    http://www.startribune.com/459/story/861186.html
     
  15. Mar 8, 2007 #95

    Ho Ho Tai

    Ho Ho Tai

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    Hello All -

    Once again, our local paper has printed an article which fits this thread, "Late Life Love" It is both copyrighted and rather lengthy. I'm posting a link here, and just a bit of the text. If you can't access it via the link, PM me and I'll get the text to you.

    http://www.startribune.com/218/story/1021562.html

    ********************************************************

    Last update: February 23, 2007 – 5:27 PM
    Late life love
    Older couples find that love comes when they aren't looking for it and share the stories of their late-in-life romance.

    By Warren Wolfe, Star Tribune
    Even a decade ago, Gerry Mooers and Dick Thomas might have been too young to fall in love.

    "We are so different. If I were much younger, I doubt I would have seen how wonderful Dick is," said Mooers, 76. "Sometimes it takes the seasoning of age to help you get past surface stuff. ... What's really important is loving and being loved."

    Mooers and Thomas, 73, are among 22 couples who fell in love later in life and described their reinvigorated lives together to Twin Cities author Connie Goldman. They talked of finances, troubled family relationships and the joy of emotional and sexual intimacy.

    Goldman, 76, tells the stories in her new book, "Late Life Love: Romance & Relationships in Later Years" (Fairview Press, $14.95). Goldman, who was a Minnesota Public Radio reporter and host of NPR's "All Things Considered" in Washington, D.C., has spent decades examining issues of aging. The book grew out of interviews with older people who kept describing new relationships -- and from Goldman herself, who fell in love with lawyer Ken Tilsen and moved to Hudson, Wis., to join him. . . .

    Story continues at link ;
    http://www.startribune.com/218/story/1021562.html
     
  16. Dec 2, 2017 #96

    Ho Ho Tai

    Ho Ho Tai

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    It's been ten years since I read or posted to this thread. I should have been in bed hours ago (as Mrs Ho Ho, gently but firmly, just pointed out). I landed here while looking for an old "how we met" story (ours!) The magic date of November 25th, 1990 was, for us, our 'Day of Knowing" our what is more conventionally called an engagement. That story is on p.2 of this thread (post #38).

    We just celebrated our 29th Day of Knowing and I was searching for my earlier description of that event - and got caught.

    So many wonderful stories in this thread and others - in fact, on this whole board - and so many old-timers to tell them. I occurred to me to wonder how many of you were still around. I just celebrated (I wrote 'celebragged' and had to correct it) my 80th birthday. Mrs Ho Ho and I celebrate every anniversary, every birthday, and every day that we still wake up together.

    I hope that you still are, or will be, in love!
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2017
  17. Dec 17, 2017 #97

    quantumbits

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    As the article says, men and woman are marrying at the highest ages ever in the US. This means fewer children. This fits what's expected of first world countries. Our replacement rate is 2.0. 2.1 is need to keep a population steady:
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/curren...countries-declining-birth-rates/#74879d343641

    I'ts nothing to worry about really since the US has plenty of immigration and its TFR is 2.0, meaning it's not perilous yet. Japan is at 1.44. There were fewer births in 2016 than ever in history:
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...-japan-fall-to-record-low-as-challenges-mount

    Number of marriages in the US is also at a all-time low:
    http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2011/12/14/barely-half-of-u-s-adults-are-married-a-record-low/

    51% of all adults in the US are currently married. In 1960, it was 72%. It's projected to drop below half.

    This goes into more detail about percent of woman never married in each age group:
    https://www.census.gov/prod/2011pubs/p70-125.pdf

    For woman, in 1986 5.3% had never married by 40-44 years of age, compared to 14.1% in 2009. This means more woman are not marrying at higher ages. This is one factor in why men and woman are marrying at higher ages than ever in US history. This pushes hte range up for woman who'll marry but are delayed. Interestingly, at 55 and over, it was 4.5% in 1986 and 5.8% in 2009, meaning the percentage of woman who never marry is close to the same in 2009. This begs the question will the younger woman continue to eventually marry as hte older woman have?

    For men, hte share is larger. In the link below, it shows for those 25 and over who've enver married, it's at an all-time high. This doesn't mean they'll never marry, but it's unprecedented:
    http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2014/09/24/record-share-of-americans-have-never-married/
     

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