Type 1 diabetes

Dimensions Magazine

Help Support Dimensions Magazine:

Shh! Don’t tell!

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 5, 2018
Messages
267
I’d be interested to hear about this. I have a genetic predisposition to type two and a lot of family members with it but I hardly even know anyone with type one and it’s a little bit alien to me. I would imagine having any kind of diabetes affects one’s relationship with one’s weight.
 

Jaycee

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2020
Messages
81
Location
U.S.A
I’d be interested to hear about this. I have a genetic predisposition to type two and a lot of family members with it but I hardly even know anyone with type one and it’s a little bit alien to me. I would imagine having any kind of diabetes affects one’s relationship with one’s weight.

I don't have anyone in my family that is even type 2. Marrying someone with type 1 I definitely learned a lot about the disease. Stress has played more with his A1C and sugars than his weight ever did/has, keep in mind he's not a big BHM. And he is good at managing it.

I do believe it makes it harder for him to understand/grasp his wife doesn't think his extra weight is a bad (I think it's the complete opposite of a bad thing) when he's been told for a long time it's a bad thing. Mixing a type 1 and FFA in a relationship puts a whole complicated spin for things for us.
 

Funtastic curves

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 16, 2018
Messages
803
Location
Home
My grandfather had typed but my grandmother and mother had type 2. From my understanding type 1 you are most likely born with it. And diagnosed at an early age.

I was too young to really understand any of it when they were alive. But I do remember they kept sweets in the house. From what I believe its having discipline. If you grow up as a type 1. You become accustomed to being around things you can't eat. But I also know weight is a big factor on a type 1 person. I say that because there is no cure for type 1 diabetes.
 

Jaycee

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2020
Messages
81
Location
U.S.A
My grandfather had typed but my grandmother and mother had type 2. From my understanding type 1 you are most likely born with it. And diagnosed at an early age.

I was too young to really understand any of it when they were alive. But I do remember they kept sweets in the house. From what I believe its having discipline. If you grow up as a type 1. You become accustomed to being around things you can't eat. But I also know weight is a big factor on a type 1 person. I say that because there is no cure for type 1 diabetes.

Type 1 is when you don't make any insulin and Type 2 is when you don't react to insulin as well.

My hubby got diagnosed at age 12 with Type 1. He still eats sweets in moderation like you said it's a lot of discipline of what you can and can't have. But being type 1 he's his favorite foods are meats and cheese being it's what he can have as much as wants without giving insulin. He has pump and is getting a sensor they make a difference with keeping it managed. As for weight I know it affects but leaving a stressful situation dropped his sugars and A1C while his weight went up and then it got stressful and his A1C and sugars went but his weight went down. That still confuses because it's the opposite of how his Dr says it works.
 

Tracyarts

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2005
Messages
2,196
Location
, Female
There's also LADA diabetes, some people call it type 1.5. It's an autoimmune related form of diabetes that presents in adulthood. It starts out looking like type 2, and responds to the same lifestyle changes and medications as type 2, but then progresses to insulin dependence with only small residual amounts of insulin still being produced. Also, damage to the pancreas can cause insulin dependence.

My doctor diagnosed me with type 1.5 in 2018. Well, technically it's not an official diagnostic code, but it fits in my case. I initially was diagnosed with PCOS related insulin resistance in my 20s, that progressed to type 2 diabetes in my 30s. But in the span of a few months, in my 40s, my blood glucose readings doubled with no changes in diet or medication. My lab tests suddenly started to look more like type 1 than type 2 diabetes, and I became completely insulin dependent.

It happened during the period when I had the severe extended autoimmune flare that caused the vasculitis episodes that caused my strokes, my pancreas just shut down. My doctor believes that it was damaged during the flare. Autoimmune diseases can definitely damage the pancreas. It fits the timeline and explains the changes.
 

Jaycee

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2020
Messages
81
Location
U.S.A
Thanks for sharing I didn't know there was also a type 1.5 interesting and not cool how that caused the damage to the pancreas. I know someone who got type 2 from after a bad ATV accident but then once he healed from the accident injuries so did his type 2.
 

extra_m13

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2007
Messages
11,114
Location
,
that is in increasingly common condition , i do not have a lot of information but i do know there are many factors involved in getting it and in their treatment and mainting a good quality of life. i also know that habits matter and that being severily overweight (i am talking 450 and over) does not help , as hot as it is
 

Tracyarts

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2005
Messages
2,196
Location
, Female
The medical explanation is loss of insulin production following an "insult to the pancreas". I know some autoimmune diseases can cause a type of pancreatitis that permanently damages the pancreas. But I don't think you can just have undiagnosed pancreatitis and get over it. Maybe you can. I really don't know. Type 2 diabetes can lead to insulin dependence over time, as the pancreas gradually slows insulin production. But that takes a long time. Whatever happened to my pancreas happened very fast. I went from well controlled type 2 diabetes with non-insulin medications to completely insulin dependent in the period of time between routine follow ups, so less than 6 months. My endocrinologist said there's no way to know what exactly happened after the fact. It's not normal for a type 2 diabetic's pancreas to shut down so abruptly though. So probably I had LADA all along, or had some kind of unidentified insult to the pancreas, possibly related to the autoimmune flare.

Whatever happened, I just had to change my treatment plan from pills and carbohydrate restriction to testing frequently and injecting insulin, and I got my blood glucose back under control pretty quickly. So it wasn't a huge problem.

The weirdest thing... my morning fasting BG readings are always the highest, by far. Apparently that's a common problem with LADA diabetes.

Thanks for sharing I didn't know there was also a type 1.5 interesting and not cool how that caused the damage to the pancreas. I know someone who got type 2 from after a bad ATV accident but then once he healed from the accident injuries so did his type 2.
 

Jaycee

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2020
Messages
81
Location
U.S.A
The medical explanation is loss of insulin production following an "insult to the pancreas". I know some autoimmune diseases can cause a type of pancreatitis that permanently damages the pancreas. But I don't think you can just have undiagnosed pancreatitis and get over it. Maybe you can. I really don't know. Type 2 diabetes can lead to insulin dependence over time, as the pancreas gradually slows insulin production. But that takes a long time. Whatever happened to my pancreas happened very fast. I went from well controlled type 2 diabetes with non-insulin medications to completely insulin dependent in the period of time between routine follow ups, so less than 6 months. My endocrinologist said there's no way to know what exactly happened after the fact. It's not normal for a type 2 diabetic's pancreas to shut down so abruptly though. So probably I had LADA all along, or had some kind of unidentified insult to the pancreas, possibly related to the autoimmune flare.

Whatever happened, I just had to change my treatment plan from pills and carbohydrate restriction to testing frequently and injecting insulin, and I got my blood glucose back under control pretty quickly. So it wasn't a huge problem.

The weirdest thing... my morning fasting BG readings are always the highest, by far. Apparently that's a common problem with LADA diabetes.

Glad to hear you've been able to manage it! That's not the easiest thing to do.

It must have been a learning curve going from managing Type 2 to have it start acting like Type 1

That is super odd about the high readings in the morning. Sometimes my hubby gets that too which is weird.

A couple weeks ago his problem was been BG going while he's working and hasn't ate anything that stumped his Dr. But he also just bad a bout with DKA
 

lonerolling

Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2020
Messages
7
Location
United States
Insulin was not created so that companies selling it could become wealthy. It was created so that the people around the world diagnosed with type 1 diabetes could have a chance in life. So live life to the fullest and take good care of it.
 

Tracyarts

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2005
Messages
2,196
Location
, Female
It was a bit of a learning curve. I was having to test my glucose 7 times a day minimum for 3 months. And frustrating. Because sometimes I get random high readings even after not eating anything high carbohydrate. Or even after not eating which was confusing and frustrating. But the A1c came down and I'm doing well now.

The high morning fasting readings is called dawn phenomenon or dawn effect. The body senses it's a new day and produces some glucose internally to jump start our bodies with a bit of energy. Yes, the body will produce glucose. From the liver maybe? My doctor explained it. But consistently high morning fasting readings is a sign of LADA diabetes. I can go to bed with a reading in the 80s, and wake up with it at 200. It's wild. When I was in the hospital they couldn't figure out how my after dinner and bedtime readings were so low but my before breakfast fasting reading 12 hours later was so high. They were sure I was eating candy or using cough drops all night. Nope, just a weird endocrine thing.

Glad to hear you've been able to manage it! That's not the easiest thing to do.

It must have been a learning curve going from managing Type 2 to have it start acting like Type 1

That is super odd about the high readings in the morning. Sometimes my hubby gets that too which is weird.

A couple weeks ago his problem was been BG going while he's working and hasn't ate anything that stumped his Dr. But he also just bad a bout with DKA
 

Latest posts

Top