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Sonic Purity

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Thanks for all the suggestions, Sonic. I’m especially interested in ‘The Shapiro Files.’

Gladly! Hopefully something there will work.

One addition i’d not yet read when i posted:

Army Wives (Chapter 1 with intro)(“Gallery” chapter TOC)
This is the antithesis of the happy-go-lucky “Tee hee, I’m getting fatter and everything is perfect and nothing ever goes wrong” fantasy tendency of many stories (including my own) in the FLS genre. It is the most gritty, realistic take on addictive extreme overeating to attempt to cope with unresolved emotional/trauma issues i’ve yet encountered. Unfortunately the first couple of chapters are fairly sloppily edited/proofread, which nearly turned me off to the story. A a Fishery Acodomy member needing to read the story through to give it a fair chance in the voting, i pushed forward.

It is a long story, not yet finished last i checked. Army Wives is a Fishery Awards 2022 winner in the categories Best Original Story and Best Writing.

I remember the paper version of Dimensions, and trust me, those stories were hard to read. Never mind the poor grammar and spelling, the obvious lack of editing was painful with poorly constructed storylines and plot holes big enough to fit my super size ass through. There was often unnecessary and graphic descriptions of sexual situations. I’m no prude, never was, but it was all just too hard to read.

Despite being age-appropriate for paper Dimensions, i only ever saw two issues (given away at the NAAFA L.A. 1998 convention). Everything you describe certainly carried over to the 1990s online stories. Must have been discomposing (or if not that, annoying) to see it in print.

Despite that, they were wildly popular. I submitted one of my first short stories to be published on the story boards of this version of the forums circa 2008 or so. I sent it to the mod at the time because I was afraid my friends here would give me grief for it, and he put it out on the boards. It may even still be in the archives somewhere, depending how far back they go. I was so disappointed when it garnered no responses, positive or negative. Apparently, a fat woman seduced by a vampire just didn’t pass the muster. Luckily for my bruised ego, my friends in the goth/vampire community loved it.

Ignoring a piece of garbage i put out in 1996 that all too well fits what we were discussing above, my first actually released story was late May 2020: Unforgettable Cruise (here on Dims)(highest fidelity version on my site). It was my then-newest story, written about the still-new COVID-19 pandemic, using all the writing skills i’d developed over the preceding decade spending a majority of time writing this sort of fiction. I threw everything i had into that story. Cleverly (and with a little help from chance), i had a breakpoint part-way through the long story arc, for a possible dramatic ending.

Started releasing… crickets. Nothing. No interest. (sigh)

Within days of starting the serialized release, a certain Minneapolis policeman ended the life of a certain citizen of color, and the world changed suddenly and dramatically yet again. My story to that point had been based heavily on real world events, set mostly in the real world universe other than my fictitious cruise line and cruise ship and its somewhat unusual itinerary. As an author categorized as “white” with a cast of characters mostly the same, i could not think of any reasonable way to continue the story. Couldn’t ignore what happened with George Floyd and the powerful, extended aftermath, and it seemed So Very Wrong to keep the story centered on my characters when in the real world it felt so important for my and others’ attention to be focused elsewhere.

So i killed it at the breakpoint and moved on. It’s the most dramatic ending i’ve yet written, but overall the story only really was starting to build up momentum when it hit the wall. (It amuses me greatly to this day that i wrote in indirect shout-outs to at least one then-popular person on all of Dimensions, Fantasy Feeder, and Curvage, and not one of those people noticed. Then again, my superpower is being invisible in plain sight.)

Sorry for the ramble, I do that….

It was wonderful, and obviously i do that too. In fact, here’s part 2 of the last section:

Your vampire story’s release story resonates hard beyond what i wrote above. The most enthusiastic responses i’ve received so far haven’t been my mainline fatlovesex stories, but my mutant stories.

For reasons far too long to explain, having to do with researching one of my then-being-written stories, i came across the Spanish visual artist Modulokss (two ending s es everywhere except his account on DeviantArt, where it’s one ending s). Something about his drawings of severely mutated and (most often) highly hypersexualized people (and i use that last word loosely) atop stock photos drew me in.

A couple of image series had stories to go along with them. I quite liked the concept of Udder Girl, but her existing fragmentary, incomplete story in broken English, not so much. For sure i give Modulokss a pass on the English as it’s not his primary language, but the thing is that wasn’t his writing, mostly. He’d secured the services of a series of supposedly English-writing friends. Talk (write) about “plot holes big enough to fit my super size ass through”, the original text for Udder Girl had holes so gaping, we could line up the butts of every Dims member of every size and maybe still not fill them! There was no there there, in many cases. Indeed, after awhile the story just dropped off entirely with no ending, but the pictures continued.

Feeling a surge of motivation, i took the original text, repaired it, filled in the gaps, made it coherent, and extended it… past the end of the original images. I did all this on my own, having no idea what the original artist might think, or if he’d even respond. Contacted him, sent it in: Modulokss loved it! We discussed releasing it, and it became my second released story (of this millennium, and that one from last millennium doesn’t count). Others in the mutant community also loved my full novelization of Udder Girl, to the point where i started getting requests for co-writes, people sending in ideas, etc.

So yes, i absolutely relate to having a stronger response from a community other than what i might consider my home community.

Seriously, though, without books I never would have travelled to magical places like Narnia, Middle Earth, Hogwarts, a town called Garoureve, the Highland Moors, Camelot, the Little Shop Around the Corner, Margrathea, Xanth, Pern, the Forest Moon of Endor, or even the Hundred Acre Wood to name a few. Books transport me through time and space where I’ve met characters who repulse and terrify me, or who imparted wisdom I’ve needed, or best of all who I have fallen in love with.

Honestly, i almost did not post in this thread at all, because i don’t feel even a fraction of as well-read as you or others posting. I was an honors student and have no known reading comprehension difficulties, yet somehow i’ve never been the sort of avid reader you clearly seem to be, and many others are. Never read Harry Potter, nor anything else you named. Movies?: don’t even ask. When people say “Have you seen–” i cut them off right there, because i already know the answer is No. Unless we go back decades: High Fidelity, A Mighty Wind, This Is Spinal Tap—never mind the list, this is a reading/books thread.

The point is: other people seem to somehow find/have/make the time to:
* See movies
* Watch TV-like programming
* Read books
and that just Does Not Happen in my life. And it’s not like i’m working an intense job that suck up my time—i’ve been unemployed since near the end of the last millennium. Throw on top of that that i rarely go out anywhere and do things (other than walks and bicycle ride loops from home returning to home), and there’s precious little for me to contribute on sites like this, or anywhere else, really.

Maybe making over-long posts like this one, repurposing online images, and turning in telephone call spammers is where my time goes.

Thank you Donna for starting this thread. Thanks to everyone who’s contributed so far, and in advance for those who will contribute in the future.
 

Donna

the book version is always better
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Gladly! Hopefully something there will work.

One addition i’d not yet read when i posted:

Army Wives (Chapter 1 with intro)(“Gallery” chapter TOC)
This is the antithesis of the happy-go-lucky “Tee hee, I’m getting fatter and everything is perfect and nothing ever goes wrong” fantasy tendency of many stories (including my own) in the FLS genre. It is the most gritty, realistic take on addictive extreme overeating to attempt to cope with unresolved emotional/trauma issues i’ve yet encountered. Unfortunately the first couple of chapters are fairly sloppily edited/proofread, which nearly turned me off to the story. A a Fishery Acodomy member needing to read the story through to give it a fair chance in the voting, i pushed forward.

It is a long story, not yet finished last i checked. Army Wives is a Fishery Awards 2022 winner in the categories Best Original Story and Best Writing.



Despite being age-appropriate for paper Dimensions, i only ever saw two issues (given away at the NAAFA L.A. 1998 convention). Everything you describe certainly carried over to the 1990s online stories. Must have been discomposing (or if not that, annoying) to see it in print.



Ignoring a piece of garbage i put out in 1996 that all too well fits what we were discussing above, my first actually released story was late May 2020: Unforgettable Cruise (here on Dims)(highest fidelity version on my site). It was my then-newest story, written about the still-new COVID-19 pandemic, using all the writing skills i’d developed over the preceding decade spending a majority of time writing this sort of fiction. I threw everything i had into that story. Cleverly (and with a little help from chance), i had a breakpoint part-way through the long story arc, for a possible dramatic ending.

Started releasing… crickets. Nothing. No interest. (sigh)

Within days of starting the serialized release, a certain Minneapolis policeman ended the life of a certain citizen of color, and the world changed suddenly and dramatically yet again. My story to that point had been based heavily on real world events, set mostly in the real world universe other than my fictitious cruise line and cruise ship and its somewhat unusual itinerary. As an author categorized as “white” with a cast of characters mostly the same, i could not think of any reasonable way to continue the story. Couldn’t ignore what happened with George Floyd and the powerful, extended aftermath, and it seemed So Very Wrong to keep the story centered on my characters when in the real world it felt so important for my and others’ attention to be focused elsewhere.

So i killed it at the breakpoint and moved on. It’s the most dramatic ending i’ve yet written, but overall the story only really was starting to build up momentum when it hit the wall. (It amuses me greatly to this day that i wrote in indirect shout-outs to at least one then-popular person on all of Dimensions, Fantasy Feeder, and Curvage, and not one of those people noticed. Then again, my superpower is being invisible in plain sight.)



It was wonderful, and obviously i do that too. In fact, here’s part 2 of the last section:

Your vampire story’s release story resonates hard beyond what i wrote above. The most enthusiastic responses i’ve received so far haven’t been my mainline fatlovesex stories, but my mutant stories.

For reasons far too long to explain, having to do with researching one of my then-being-written stories, i came across the Spanish visual artist Modulokss (two ending s es everywhere except his account on DeviantArt, where it’s one ending s). Something about his drawings of severely mutated and (most often) highly hypersexualized people (and i use that last word loosely) atop stock photos drew me in.

A couple of image series had stories to go along with them. I quite liked the concept of Udder Girl, but her existing fragmentary, incomplete story in broken English, not so much. For sure i give Modulokss a pass on the English as it’s not his primary language, but the thing is that wasn’t his writing, mostly. He’d secured the services of a series of supposedly English-writing friends. Talk (write) about “plot holes big enough to fit my super size ass through”, the original text for Udder Girl had holes so gaping, we could line up the butts of every Dims member of every size and maybe still not fill them! There was no there there, in many cases. Indeed, after awhile the story just dropped off entirely with no ending, but the pictures continued.

Feeling a surge of motivation, i took the original text, repaired it, filled in the gaps, made it coherent, and extended it… past the end of the original images. I did all this on my own, having no idea what the original artist might think, or if he’d even respond. Contacted him, sent it in: Modulokss loved it! We discussed releasing it, and it became my second released story (of this millennium, and that one from last millennium doesn’t count). Others in the mutant community also loved my full novelization of Udder Girl, to the point where i started getting requests for co-writes, people sending in ideas, etc.

So yes, i absolutely relate to having a stronger response from a community other than what i might consider my home community.



Honestly, i almost did not post in this thread at all, because i don’t feel even a fraction of as well-read as you or others posting. I was an honors student and have no known reading comprehension difficulties, yet somehow i’ve never been the sort of avid reader you clearly seem to be, and many others are. Never read Harry Potter, nor anything else you named. Movies?: don’t even ask. When people say “Have you seen–” i cut them off right there, because i already know the answer is No. Unless we go back decades: High Fidelity, A Mighty Wind, This Is Spinal Tap—never mind the list, this is a reading/books thread.

The point is: other people seem to somehow find/have/make the time to:
* See movies
* Watch TV-like programming
* Read books
and that just Does Not Happen in my life. And it’s not like i’m working an intense job that suck up my time—i’ve been unemployed since near the end of the last millennium. Throw on top of that that i rarely go out anywhere and do things (other than walks and bicycle ride loops from home returning to home), and there’s precious little for me to contribute on sites like this, or anywhere else, really.

Maybe making over-long posts like this one, repurposing online images, and turning in telephone call spammers is where my time goes.

Thank you Donna for starting this thread. Thanks to everyone who’s contributed so far, and in advance for those who will contribute in the future.

Sonic, THANK YOU (& everybody else whose participating). I’m so glad I decided to meander my way back to Dimensions.
 

Tad

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I'm working my way through The Murderbot Diaries by Martha Wells (so far including four novellas and one full novel, which between them have won a bucket of awards). Despite the name some deeply human (and frequently funny) science fiction, looking at the terrifying question of choosing who you want to be, when you could be whatever you want? (premise is that a security android that had been forced to kill quite a few civilians hacks his regulator module that can override his behavior so that he can never be forced to do that again, but gradually the weight of having freedom of choice leads him out of his predestined roll and having to actually interact with other beings).

My only complaintes is that I get through the novellas too quickly, and then have to wait forever for the next installment to be available from the library.
 

mathfa

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Just finished Caves of Steel by Asimov. The Foundation series is my favorite book series of all time, and I read some of the Robot series out of order back in the day, because my library had limited selection. So now my goal is to read the Robot series again start to finish here this next month+.
 
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Donna

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Well, the modern retelling of Persephone & Hades put me in a mood for more of the same. I’ve moved Sherrilyn Kenyon McQueen‘s latest in her Greek mythos themed Dark Hunter series to the top of my TBR pile. Currently I’m devouring ’Stygian’.

Greek myth, modern day BBW, vampires…*sigh* 😍
 

Joker

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Right now I am reading a 2 page post on Dimensions boards of what everyone is reading.
I will let myself out now. ;)
 

Donna

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My last couple of novels have left me feeling rather over emotional and drained. ‘Stygian’ only added to it, so yesterday I read a romance novel with the provocative title ‘Hotwife’. For the first time in many years, I’m setting a book aside and contemplating. Not finishing it. It’s not what I expected (in a negative way) and I’m all out of spoons right now.

Instead of taking a chance on the next title in my TBR pile, I’m diving back into books I read ten years ago, Raymond E. Feast’s Riftwar Saga, starting with ‘Magician; Apprentice.’ So very good. Feist has that ability to write characters who spring from the page and he even makes his villains and bad guys sympathetic. Very vivid imagery in these books. If you haven’t read them, and are a fan of the fantasy genre, I highly recommend them.
 
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Instead of taking a chance on the next title in my TBR pile, I’m diving back into books I read ten years ago, Raymond E. Feast’s Riftwar Saga, starting with ‘Magician; Apprentice.’ So very good. Feist has that ability to write characters who spring from the page and he even makes his villains and bad guys sympathetic. Very vivid imagery in these books. If you haven’t read them, and are a fan of the fantasy genre, I highly recommend them.

Many years ago I grabbed Raymond E. Feist's Faerie Tale from a train station newsagent shelf, and I couldn't put it down. It was the cover that intrigued me at the time, and also my love of anything fairy/faerie, but it's now one of those books that I read every year.
 

Donna

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Many years ago I grabbed Raymond E. Feist's Faerie Tale from a train station newsagent shelf, and I couldn't put it down. It was the cover that intrigued me at the time, and also my love of anything fairy/faerie, but it's now one of those books that I read every year.

I hadn't thought about it in years. I was chatting with an author friend about Sci-Fi and Fantasy and he mentioned Feist. We both had such fond memories of the series, it made sense to reread. I've only made it about 1/3 of the way through book 1, but it's already helping lighten my seriously dark mood.
 

Dr. Feelgood

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Recently my reading has trended towards animal welfare: I just finished Jonathan Safran Foer's Eating Animals, and now I'm reading Temple Grandin's Animals in Translation.
 

Donna

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I'm currently immersed in reading, and rereading, my own manuscript for a story I've given the working title of Fat Girl Magic.

Other than that, I have two books going at the same time, unusual for me. I am reading a book of ee cummings poetry and M.A. Knights' The Pig in the Derby Hat. and its prequel Hobgoblins Don't Like Honey. Martin is a great author, avid reader like myself, and a delight to know.
 

Donna

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Finished the Knights' books, and I strongly recommend them. SO charming. I cannot wait for him to finish his next book.

Over the Easter weekend I read three novels by a new author (to me), Molly O'Hare. Her books are pure romantic comedies. Her female lead characters are fat women, and I'm not just talking curvy, chubby, or whatever the current trend is. These ladies are built like me and O'Hare seems to really get what it's like to navigate the world of sex and dating in a bigger body. I haven't seen a picture of her yet, but I would bet dollars to donuts she resides in a fat body similar to my own. Her lead male characters tend toward an aesthetic that can be a bit stereotypical, but they're all good guys.

This morning I started a sci-fi/fantasy series by Miranda Bridges called The War Brides of the Morja. Reviews on Amazon were mixed, but I read a snippet on social media and they piqued my interest.
 

Donna

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I've been eyeing the Ruff book, but the reviews are mixed. It's purported to be a blending of HP Lovecraft's style with a historical look at racism in America. Most reviewers don't seem to be picking up on the Lovecraft styling, but fans of Lovecraft's writing tend to be a picky bunch. He's one of those authors folks either love or hate, and I'm one of the rare souls who are ambivalent. I've still added to my TBR list.

I finished the War Brides of Morja series in time to read Elle M. Drew's newest in her wolf shifter series, Trapped in Garoureve. Kudos for both series, especially Drew's. A friend sent me a copy of Fat White Vampire Blues by Andrew Fox that they recommended highly, so I'm ignoring my TBR list for now, and starting it today so we can discuss it. They're chomping at the bit to get my take, and given my tastes run similar to theirs, it should be a good read and an interesting discussion.
 

Tad

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I was reading -- having started less than five days ago -- the first two books of the Scholomance trilogy by Naomi Novik. I'd previously enjoyed her long Temeraire series (Napoleonic wars + dragons) and her stand alone novels that built worlds to bring life to a couple of fairy tales, so when I belatedly noticed that she had a new series out I grabbed the first book without really knowing anything more about it.

The elevator pitch for the series would probably be "Hunger games crossed with Harry Potter", which works well for her signature awareness of class and privilege. And I whipped through the first book in less than two days. Then I discovered that by some miracle the teeny-tiny library branch near our house actually had the second book available (I'm serious about it being a miracle -- our local branch is a barely expanded Carnegie grant library, that we mostly use for bringing in holds from larger libraries. It actually having a book I'm looking for happens maybe every few years. It was a sign!). So I got my hands on the book Monday and what with work I didn't finish it until this afternoon.

So yah, if the pitch appeals to you at all, the fact that I breathlessly sucked these down so quickly and am now impatient for September probably tells you that you should give them a shot. She is an experienced author who starts the series half way through their second-last year in their magic school/prison/survival-nightmare, and while it takes a few pages to wind up to speed as she goes through some dense world building, it just moves seamlessly through plot, character building, relationship building, and world building after that, with every paragraph serving to move things forward in one way or another.

Definitely not everyone's taste, but if you like that sort of thing, I highly recommend the series.
 

Donna

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Shotha, are you a Hindu, or just curious about Hinduism? I tried reading it in my twenties when I was reading as many religious texts as I could because I was searching for a path to follow. It never called to me.

Fat White Vampire Blues was a hard read for me. (I normally read a novel of this length in one to two days, this one took me five days.) It wasn't what I was expecting, and it provoked a great deal of unwelcome self reflection. I knew going in that the main character was the antithesis of the seductive, handsome, charming vampire trope. Jules, the main character, is a glutton, he's lazy, kind of stupid, and all together repulsive. I didn't like that the author while trying to break free from the stereotypical vampire lead resorted to making Jules all of the worst fat stereotypes. He could've very well been written without the fat is pejorative angle. There were some messages buried in the book about self esteem, but I didn't really bother contemplating them because I felt like every page was just one big fat-bashing.

To cleanse my taste buds, I devoured Tents & Tights by Molly O'Hare. Pure Rom Com, brain candy. Last night I started Torn by Carian Cole, another favorite author of mine.
 

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