What book are you reading right now?

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Edens_heel

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I personally really LOVED having the e-reader :) Now I have the iPad so I've been reading my books on it. Which I love even more. I'm someone who really enjoys a book, going to the bookstore, the smell, etc so I was thinking it might be hard to get used to reading my books on a screen but nope...was fairly easy. Now I go browse the bookstore and then go home and d/l the book for much cheaper.

I personally highly suggest getting the Nook! :D Plus it's so much better for the environment!
Honestly, don't care about the cost or the environment when it comes to books - I can simply not get over losing the touch, feel, smell, and sense of progress (being able to visibly see how many pages are left and working through to the end) that comes with having an e-reader. I've tried it many times, and it's a lost cause for me.

I can safely say I won't be joining the e-reader brigade.
 

pdgujer148

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Peter Gujer,
Honestly, don't care about the cost or the environment when it comes to books - I can simply not get over losing the touch, feel, smell, and sense of progress (being able to visibly see how many pages are left and working through to the end) that comes with having an e-reader. I've tried it many times, and it's a lost cause for me.

I can safely say I won't be joining the e-reader brigade.
I used to feel the same way until I bought a kindle.

I'm not totally sold on ebooks, but they do have advantages.

1. They are great if you have to shlep around a bunch of reference books. I manage OSHA, NAID, and ISO programs at work. It is nice not having to deal with a bulky library of reference books.

2. They're great if you sometimes read ephemeral junk books from time to time. There is no way I'm paying $26 for a Douglas Preston/Lincoln Child potboiler, but for $9.99 I'll indulge.

3. My library is virtually everywhere. I can read my books on my computer, my iPod, and my kindle.

4. Thousands of free classic novels, and many publishers offer up free books to introduce modern novelists.

That said, my paper library is growing at a steady pace. I've just become choosier about the books that I buy.
 

HottiMegan

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My interest in an e-reader is to be able to have so many books at my fingertips. And being able, hopefully, to read in the dark. I often stay up into the wee hours of the night reading in bed. I'd love to do that without a flashlight shoved under my head to shine on the book. i'm attracted to the nook because it runs Android and the free reads at Barnes and Noble.
 

Weirdo890

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My interest in an e-reader is to be able to have so many books at my fingertips. And being able, hopefully, to read in the dark. I often stay up into the wee hours of the night reading in bed. I'd love to do that without a flashlight shoved under my head to shine on the book. i'm attracted to the nook because it runs Android and the free reads at Barnes and Noble.
I say go with the Nook. My mom has one, and absolutely adores it. She loves getting the free e-books from Barnes and Noble.
 

Weirdo890

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I had to put Don Quixote down for a while. I wanted to find out more about the time period and place that the book is set in. I'm now reading Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens. I'm really enjoying it. Dickens is a great storyteller. Top-notch writing. I love the ever-looming sarcastic narration. The book I want to read next is Bambi: A Life in the Woods by Felix Salten.
 

lalatx

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The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead by Max Brooks

It is best to be prepared for the inevitable.
 

willowmoon

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The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead by Max Brooks

It is best to be prepared for the inevitable.
I used to work with the living dead -- it's called third shift.

The book I've been reading is A Year at the Movies: One Man's Filmgoing Odyssey, by Kevin Murphy, of Mystery Science 3000 Theater fame. Good stuff.
 

lalatx

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I used to work with the living dead -- it's called third shift.

The book I've been reading is A Year at the Movies: One Man's Filmgoing Odyssey, by Kevin Murphy, of Mystery Science 3000 Theater fame. Good stuff.
I miss MST 300 we used to watch it on the weekends when I was a kid.
 

Agent 007

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The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead by Max Brooks

It is best to be prepared for the inevitable.
Hmm, that brings back memories of the Zombie Thread.

You're right. In a post-apocalyptic world it's necessary to know how to deal the folks who didn't get into their bomb shelter in time. :)
 

Agent 007

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The book I'm reading right now is "Three Victories and a Defeat: The Rise and Fall of the First British Empire, 1714-1783" by the British historian Brendan Simms. It's an interesting historical study of British foreign policy in the 18th century. In the book Simms argues that, contrary to popular opinion, British statesmen in this period were not primarily focused on naval or colonial expansion, but on maintaining the balance of power in Europe and on maintaining "European liberties". When Britain neglected its European commitments and alliances and focused too much on naval or colonial issues, the results were terrible. The American War of Independence is an example of this.

A review of the book can be found here.
 

moore2me

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I have a question and a comment about e books. First, a question for those of you that have the electronic readers and have been using them. How sturdy are the machines? I am pretty spastic and accident prone. I drop stuff during the day (not on purpose), but I am hard on equipment. I try to be careful, but take precautions like using plastic drinking glasses and plastic or paper plates. I limit buying kitchen items packaged in glass. Is there any point in trying to work with a Kindle?


An unrelated comment about hard copies of books. I have been collecting books for almost fifty years. My collection reached its peak and most interesting during my college years. I have saved many of my books and consider them to be long-term friends. They give me comfort and make me happy. Every now and then, I give one away to a friend or a young person. Sometimes I lend one out. Most just sit on the bookcase and we look at each other. I remember the good & bad times I had when going thru school and using the books. Sometimes I open one of them and read my class notes on the margins. When I sit in the library surrounded by these old books, it is one of my favorite places to be in my house.
 

pdgujer148

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Peter Gujer,
I have a question and a comment about e books. First, a question for those of you that have the electronic readers and have been using them. How sturdy are the machines?
The kindle has a fairly delicate screen. I dropped one about four feet and cracked the screen (it was in a hard-backed cover at the time).

I'd recommend the iPad for the accident prone. A little more expensive, but very sturdy. There is a kindle app for the iPad as well.
 

largenlovely

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Ya know, i can appreciate a sudden twist in a book...or a good metaphor illustrating a point, but my book took about the stupidest twist that i would have never foresaw....i'm gonna finish the book, but i don't know that my opinion can be salvaged after this....

I'm hoping the ending will make me change my mind but it doesn't look good

the book is, "The Passage" by Connie Willis
 

CastingPearls

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The kindle has a fairly delicate screen. I dropped one about four feet and cracked the screen (it was in a hard-backed cover at the time).

I'd recommend the iPad for the accident prone. A little more expensive, but very sturdy. There is a kindle app for the iPad as well.
I was waiting for this comparison. I've been debating btw the Kindle and iPad. I'm glad I hesitated. Thanks.
 

Edens_heel

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David Nickle's Monstrous Affections - collected short stories.

I've been on a true short fiction kick for the past year, and it's only getting worse (which is interesting since a couple of years ago I found myself not at all interested in short fiction, whereas now it seems to be dominating my reading and writing patterns).

Anyone have some good short story compilation recommendations? Or want some?
 

largenlovely

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well, "The Passage" did not redeem itself in the end...NEXT

I'm moving on to "Where Are You Now" by Mary Higgins Clark
 

largenlovely

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Well, upon further inspection i realized i've already read "Where Are You Now" by Mary Higgins Clark....obviously, it didn't make much of an impression on me since i didn't remember reading it until i started re-reading it lol

So, i'll move on to, "The Pillars of the Earth" by Ken Follett
 

MuleVariationsNYC

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So, i'll move on to, "The Pillars of the Earth" by Ken Follett
Pillars of the Earth is a good read, a sort of sweeping epic novel. I read 3 or 4 Follett books several years ago, and I thought it was the best of them by a fair amount.

Currently I'm making my way through, "Out of Our Heads: Why You are Not Your Brain, and Other Lessons from the Biology of Consciousness." Despite the long title, it's a relatively accessible read, although not the most amazing writing.
 
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