The use of British Words

Discussion in 'Daily Living' started by CPProp, Nov 14, 2012.

  1. Nov 25, 2012 #41

    CastingPearls

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    I've worked in real estate on the east coast and have never heard 'flat' used regarding rentals. Ever.

    Also, as you mentioned, one walled residences can be called 'duplexes' if they're a rental or owned, as well as the term 'semi-attached *whatever the type of house it is* ie; semi-attached townhouse.

    I wonder if what we in the US call 'garden apartments' are what are called 'terraced apartments' in the UK. EDT: Just checked. Nope. Terraced apartments are one type of high-rise apartment houses in the US in which the external apartments all have a small patio.
     
  2. Nov 26, 2012 #42

    RabbitScorpion

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    Interesting. I guess a "flat" might be a midwest thing, perhaps even a Detroit thing (it may be falling out of use here, as most two-family flats in the area were built before 1930 in Detroit Proper - many of these neighborhoods are now vacant.

    Also interesting is your mention of the term "garden apartment", I've read that term before, and have no idea what it means, it is never heard here!
     
  3. Nov 26, 2012 #43

    largenlovely

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    I've heard of most of them and could use them in a sentence except for skint, muppet, numpty and chav. Though the rest, I never use with the exception of bum maybe ..if I'm forced to be polite about it lol

    We have started getting roundabouts here as well, though they are at smaller intersections. Though I had used them in other parts of the country before we started getting them here. I can't say I like them though.
     
  4. Nov 26, 2012 #44

    Shinobi_Hime-Sama

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    I try to use some of the less common ones because I have a lot of British friends on the various sites I haunt daily. Most recent use I've made are the words Loft and Lorry. I think Loft is the British word for attic and Lorry might refer to a bathroom, not sure on that one. I did learn that they call a car trunk a Boot though. I watch BBC Canada mostly for the times they run Holmes on Homes or Holmes Inspection. But in my current NaNo (a 30 day 50 000 word challenge of writing a novel) I have a British character who is pretty essential to the plot and I'm trying to portray his lines using words that one would hear in Britain. It's hard I'm finding.
     
  5. Nov 26, 2012 #45

    penguin

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    A lorry is a type of truck, usually a semi-trailer. Loo, lav or WC are terms you might hear Brits use for toilet. Dunny and loo are used here for that.

    Flats or units are used interchangeably here. Some fancier places (complexes that have pools, gyms, etc) are 'luxury units', but we don't use apartment or condo. Townhouses are smaller two storey houses, sometimes detached, sometimes not, with a small front and back yard. Having estates of those is quite common.
     
  6. Nov 26, 2012 #46

    CPProp

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    Like most counties there are regional words / saying as well as the every day ones. It may help if you could give some idea of the area the character is likely to hail from, for example if they were born and breed in greater London they could be upper crust, middle class, east or west enders, cockneys if born within the sounds of bow bells and each would have there own words and sometimes different ways of pronouncing everyday words. Age of the character is something else to take into account, as the words they use are likely to be slightly different for each generation. I hope that might help more than put you off.
     
  7. Nov 27, 2012 #47

    MattB

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    Just thought of another, in my house growing up we used "telly" as much as "TV" or "the tube". We also used "idiot-box", when one didn't like what was on in the days of no cable.
     
  8. Nov 27, 2012 #48

    CastingPearls

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    LOL It must be a regional thing!

    Garden apartments vary wildly in how many units are in each building but the buildings themselves are grouped around ornamental gardens and landscaping. I've seen lovely ones that had two upper/two lower in a sweet little cottage set-up while still remaining roomy, and I've seen others that looked like souped-up colonials and Green revivals but had more than a dozen units and were underwhelming and depressingly dark inside.
     
  9. Nov 27, 2012 #49

    Jon Blaze

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    "Bollocks" lol
     
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  10. Nov 28, 2012 #50

    Yakatori

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    My most immediate association with this particular phrase is a bit of creative-license for advertising purposes of what's basically a refinished basement for rent, either in a townhouse or single-family home. And, for some reason, I just assumed it was borrowed from British-English.
     
  11. Nov 28, 2012 #51

    CastingPearls

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    That's one take. I've never seen one that was refinished anything. The ones I'm referring to (all the kinds) were new and designed to be part of groupings of buildings around gardens.
     
  12. Nov 28, 2012 #52

    Dromond

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    Over here, we pronounce it "Bollix." It means about the same thing, though.
     
  13. Nov 28, 2012 #53

    Gingembre

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    LOL! And it's such a good value word! I mean, you have "bollocks" meaning "testicles", "bollocks" meaning "nonsense", "bollocks!" as an exclamation of annoyance or contempt and "dog's bollocks" meaning "the best".
     
  14. Nov 29, 2012 #54

    fat9276

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    I use "bugger" all the time... picked it up from watching "Four Weddings and a Funeral" ages ago. :p
     
  15. Nov 29, 2012 #55

    CPProp

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    Does any one use under the cosh to mean being pressurised?
     
  16. Nov 29, 2012 #56

    nitewriter

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    I can't say that I do. My former Father in Law is a Brit and one of his favorite sayings was He has his knickers in a twist:doh: and another was If he keeps that up he'll come to a sticky end!:eek:
     
  17. Nov 29, 2012 #57

    luscious_lulu

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    My mom was from England. So I use many of those. One not on the list is ta, it means thank you.
     
  18. Nov 30, 2012 #58

    MrBob

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    'Bloody hell'...it's the lego of British swearing...we all start playing with it from a young age.

    Does any other country use 'minging' (means something horrible and disgusting), pronounced mingin'. Not to be confused with Minge, which is an euphemism for your lady garden.

    And other countries need to start using the phrase of exasperation, 'Gordon Bennett!'...it's another variant to Bloody Hell or Jesus Christ. Sadly it seems to be dying out but I'm doing my best to keep it going.

    One that I've noticed being used a lot more in North America is 'Wanker', so much more effective than 'jerk-off'.
     
  19. Nov 30, 2012 #59

    Gingembre

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    Ditto "Oh my giddy aunt", or, to use the full phrase "oh my giddy aunt, fanny". Which is more amusing to those that know that fanny is also another name for lady garden. Lolz.
     
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  20. Dec 1, 2012 #60

    CPProp

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    Has the expression that’s wizard – meaning: superb; excellent; wonderful migrated from the British shores and does any one use it or do you have your own? I know the Australians have or used to have (its been 30 odd years since I was there) bonzer which roughly meant the same.
     

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