Advice for prediabetes

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TheRdmGuy

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Does anyone have any advice when it comes to dealing with avoiding diabetes? I don't have much sugar but a lot of carbs as a vegetarian feedee. My doctor told me my blood sugar is in the 'prediabetic' stage (but on the lower side). The doctor said I can take metformin to help me lose weight and control my blood sugar but that obviously wouldn't be ideal. is prediabetes even a big deal?


I want to continue to gain (am only 135 kg so far) but don't want to risk health if I can avoid it and my partner only supports my gaining as long as I keep healthy. I would prefer no medication at all but Is anyone taking any other medications for prediabetes that don't cause weight loss? I saw some diabetes meds that cause weight gain instead, but I don't know if diabetes meds are the same as prediabetes meds.

Any advice would be really appreciated, last time i got told this by my doctor I ended up losing 20 kg because they scared me into it but I don't want to do that again. Not sure if I have the courage to just ask the doc for ones that will let me keep gaining weight lol
 

agouderia

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Whether prediabetes is a big deal is one of the biggest current international medical hot button issues. Assessment as to what prediabetic exactly is, with which blood glucose levels it starts and how to deal with it deviates extremely with regards to country and health care system. Bottom line though is, as with cholesterol and blood pressure, the recommended "good levels" have been lowered significantly over the past years - without anyone knowing whether this has any real impact on individual (... which truly is highly different from person to person!) health.

In order to assess where you and your blood glucose levels fit in, you need to do some online research and actually check out recommendations from diabetes societies, medical advice sites, etc. in different countries and try to figure out the best match for your personal but also family medical history with regards to diabetes. Should the latter be the case then medical monitoring and treatment might be asked for.

That said - next to diet, exercise and eating patterns are the other two set screws where you can make changes to help avoid prediabetes turning into diabetes over time. One is making sure you get enough exercise - walking, biking, swimming - maybe even before breakfast or in the evenings before going to bed, that helps lower blood sugar levels.
The other is observing longer fasting periods, no snacking between meals, sticking to a longer over-night fasting period to help prevent insulin resistance building up.

All the best for finding your individual solution!
 

Tad

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Is it a big deal? Hard to say for sure. Why they worry about it is that most cases of type 2 diabetes seem to have an aspect of a wear-out mechanism to them, so seeing blood sugar levels getting higher can be a warning that your body is beginning to struggle to handle the glucose levels that it is getting. (the cycle is that your pancreas pumps out a lot of insulin to get your cells to absorb more glucose, gradually the cells stop being as responsive to insulin (over exposure? I don't know the actual mechanism), which means that for the same amount of glucose coming in your pancreas doesn't see glucose levels dropping quickly enough so it sends out even more insulin, which may result in other cells becoming more insulin resistant ... and that cycle keeps spiraling up until your pancreas just can't pump out higher levels of insulin, or even worse begins to weaken and can't even put out as much as it used to.

That cycle is by far not the only explanation for type 2 diabetes (by this time I've read enough explanations that I'm sure that there are multiple pathways to get there, each of which is a combination of factors, but the wear-out one seems likely as a common culprit).

What you can do about it is work to keep glucose from hitting your system too quickly, or by helping your body deal with it. On the slowing the in-rush side you can look at low glycemic index foods (foods that don't raise your blood sugar as much per 100grams eaten), and also not have simple carbs on their own (having them with fat and protein slows down digestion, lowering the peak in-rush of glucose), and having more high-fibre carbs (which also get digested more slowly), and just generally moving more of your calories from carbs to fats.

On the helping your body process it, getting some exercise just before or after eating seems to help a lot of people lower their peak glucose (I presume it is mostly muscles absorbing more glucose during and for a while after exercise, but it may also be more than that). Even ten minutes of something that raises your breathing rate and warms you up a bit can likely make a measurable difference.

Anyone can go buy a blood glucose meter. The strips are kind of expensive if you are buying on your own (not covered by insurance) but you could use it to look at how your body responds to various meals and activities, to better map out what keeps your levels stable.
 

TheRdmGuy

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Really appreciate the responses! I did go out and buy a blood glucose meter so I will try and keep an eye on it. I've never really been one for exercise I'm going to start making an effort to try before / after meals like you've suggested. Not sure I can quit the snacking but will try overnight fasting.
 
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Tad

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Snacking is ... not necessarily a bad thing with diabetes. The recommendation generally seems to be "three modest meals and three substantial snacks". This does two things, it spreads out your glucose in-flow, hopefully lowering peaks, and also maybe reduces big dips in blood glucose levels (which result in your liver releasing glucose to even things out, sometimes right as you eat again, making a bigger spike.

Btw, another possible contributor to type 2 diabetes is (colloquially speaking) full fat cells. When they say "cells become insulin resistant" in substantial part that likely means "fat cells are not sucking up excess glucose and storing it as fat, the way that they should.".

There may be a couple (at least) reasons for this, one that I honestly don't grok well that has to do with clumps of fat that have issues, but the other being the logical enough situation that fat cells can only grow so big before it gets hard for them to store more fat (I think of this as fat cells being like car suspension, and being over full being like the car being overloaded so that the suspension is bottomed out an unable to absorb shocks). You can grow more fat cells, but at best this is a slow process and apparently our bodies may not always be as eager to do so as those of us in this community might prefer (another topic that I don't understand much about).

This may be why very modest weight loss can have a big impact on diabetes, emptying out fat cells just a bit may let them do their job better.
 
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I'm 5'7 and, the last time I checked, was 274 pounds, or in the metric system, 124.2843 kgs which I always read as "kegs" as in "kegs of beer."

A close relative is a diabetes specialist and he says that it's mostly genetics and family history, although of course being obese increases your risk of almost everything that can go wrong with these space suits we call "bodies" over a lifetime. My vitals, as of April, are all fine - blood pressure, heart, cholestorol. There it is in black and white. And I have zero diabetes in my family, with two direct relatives living well over 90, so...the odds are in my favor.

While I have no specific plans to keep going up another pants size, I also have no specific plans to stop it, either, or to curtail my love of eating lots of delish food!

Hope this helps in some small way. L
 
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