Cakes, Cakes, Cakes

Dimensions Magazine

Help Support Dimensions Magazine:

DazzlingAnna

✈ 🇬🇷
DM Supporter
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Messages
1,320
Location
Germany
I have heard that people from different parts or the country here passionately discuss about what to expect when ordering a "Pfannkuchen".
No secret that a translation word by word implies that there must have been some involvement of a pan while baking this cake. But it is not that easy.

From the region I originally come from a Pfannkuchen is called a "Berliner" elsewhere. It is a kind of doughnut with jam inside.
What others expect when ordering a "Pfannkuchen" is basicially a pancake, (yeah!) - diameter is smaller than a French crêpe but it is much thicker.
I call them "Eierkuchen" ("egg"cake).

I don't discuss about this because I like both 😊
 

Joker

***
Joined
Apr 24, 2007
Messages
1,907
Location
Clarksville TN
I have heard that people from different parts or the country here passionately discuss about what to expect when ordering a "Pfannkuchen".
No secret that a translation word by word implies that there must have been some involvement of a pan while baking this cake. But it is not that easy.

From the region I originally come from a Pfannkuchen is called a "Berliner" elsewhere. It is a kind of doughnut with jam inside.
What others expect when ordering a "Pfannkuchen" is basicially a pancake, (yeah!) - diameter is smaller than a French crêpe but it is much thicker.
I call them "Eierkuchen" ("egg"cake).

I don't discuss about this because I like both 😊
A Berliner is a jelly doughnut here. :)
 

Tad

Dimensions' loiterer
Joined
Sep 29, 2005
Messages
13,616
Location
The great white north, eh?
I grew up with pretty much my only exposure to cake being birthday cakes. My Mom's recipe was a fine birthday cake, but overall I didn't find cake too exciting.

Then I discovered some of the classics from/inspired by Europe, all full of ganache and what-not. Opera, Trinity, the famous Sacher-Torte, and their ilk. Mmmmmm, so good!

But those are far beyond my baking ambitions. At home by contrast the one 'cake' I make is what in my family is called a 'whacky cake' but I've heard others describe as a 'Depression (era) cake', presumably because it uses no eggs or butter -- it is more or less a home-made cake mix, and just about fast to mix up and cook. That ability to say "I want cake" and be eating a warm piece of cake about 45 minutes later (a bit quicker if the oven is still warm from cooking supper, or if you are willing to scald yourself on too-hot cake) is pretty satisfying 😸
 

Joker

***
Joined
Apr 24, 2007
Messages
1,907
Location
Clarksville TN
I grew up with pretty much my only exposure to cake being birthday cakes. My Mom's recipe was a fine birthday cake, but overall I didn't find cake too exciting.

Then I discovered some of the classics from/inspired by Europe, all full of ganache and what-not. Opera, Trinity, the famous Sacher-Torte, and their ilk. Mmmmmm, so good!

But those are far beyond my baking ambitions. At home by contrast the one 'cake' I make is what in my family is called a 'whacky cake' but I've heard others describe as a 'Depression (era) cake', presumably because it uses no eggs or butter -- it is more or less a home-made cake mix, and just about fast to mix up and cook. That ability to say "I want cake" and be eating a warm piece of cake about 45 minutes later (a bit quicker if the oven is still warm from cooking supper, or if you are willing to scald yourself on too-hot cake) is pretty satisfying 😸
As my mother said. I made this cake from scratch, I scratched off the box top to save it and threw it in the mixer with eggs water and milk maybe some butter.
 

Tracyarts

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2005
Messages
2,323
Location
, Female
German chocolate cake isn't from Germany. It was the free recipe printed on the inside of the box of German's brand baking chocolate. The cake is a chocolate layer cake with pecan and coconut caramel frosting. It's an old recipe, at least from my grandparents' time.

Screenshot_20210501-024302_Samsung Internet.jpg
Screenshot_20210501-024334_Samsung Internet.jpg



Interesting. I never knew that something like a German Chocolate Cake existed. I mean we have chocolate cakes here but I didn't know about this recipe in particular.
 

Barrett

OMG, Becky, look at his belly.
DM Supporter
Joined
Oct 9, 2007
Messages
576
Location
SC
So the mayonnaise, is it a fat substitute for the cake, AmyJo, instead of butter or oil? You've got me curious.
I'm not sure of the details on it, that just what my aunt has always liked. I used to help my grandmother make it for her years ago and then I kept doing it after she passed. It's a layer cake, really moist, and hard to keep together. Half the time it still falls apart on me lol!
Yup! It's a fat substitute.
It also makes a cake really moist.
(and it doesn't impart a mayonnaise flavor at all, if anyone was side-eyeing.)
 

AmyJo1976

SSBBW & FFA
DM Lifetime Supporting Member
DM Supporter
***
Joined
Dec 7, 2011
Messages
2,733
Location
USA
Yup! It's a fat substitute.
It also makes a cake really moist.
(and it doesn't impart a mayonnaise flavor at all, if anyone was side-eyeing.)
you would think so, but it really doesn't!
 

Barrett

OMG, Becky, look at his belly.
DM Supporter
Joined
Oct 9, 2007
Messages
576
Location
SC
One of a couple of recipes my mom got from a certain family friend back when I was a kid (which we now consider family recipes), was for a
Fresh Apple Cake.

After Marge gifted us with this recipe, I asked for it as my birthday cake for many years. Mom actually made two just last week while another family friend was visiting.
I even made it myself, once, a few years ago.



I made a wee mess on the cake holder because I didn't wait long enough for the caramel glaze to cool a little (to let it thicken a wee bit) before I poured it over the cake.
Oops.

Recipe:

FRESH APPLE CAKE

In a large mixing bowl, beat together:
1½ Cups cooking oil
3 Large eggs

Measure into a separate bowl:
3 Cups plain flour
2 Cups brown sugar
1 teasp baking soda
1 teasp salt
Mix the dry ingredients together with a fork until
the flour and sugar are evenly combined.

Then with the mixer running in the oil/egg bowl,
add the dry ingredients a little at a time until
the wet and dry are well-incorporated.

Fold-in the following:
3 Cups tart apples, chopped
1 Cup walnuts, chopped

Spoon batter into a bundt pan.
Bake at 350 degrees (F) for 1 hour 15 minutes.
Remove from oven, let cool in pan on cooling rack for 15-20 minutes then
invert onto cake dish.

Topping:
1 stick butter
1 Cup brown sugar
¼ Cup evaporated milk
1 Cup walnuts, chopped

Bring to boil for 2½ minutes,
remove from heat, and let cool for
a short time to allow it to start thickening a little.
Pour over cake while still warm.
 

AmyJo1976

SSBBW & FFA
DM Lifetime Supporting Member
DM Supporter
***
Joined
Dec 7, 2011
Messages
2,733
Location
USA
I've never had apple cake, but I have had apple crisp and I love it!. My husband doesn't like apple anything, so we don't have that here sadly. He doesn't like bananas either, but I love banana bread! He has to get over that! ;)
 
Top