Noni juice anyone?

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Punkin1024

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Hubby bought a bottle of Noni juice and wants me to give it a try. His boss has been taking the juice for two months and claims it has made a vast difference in his health. Hubby drank it before he had apherisis last time and it may have affected his platelet count. Has anyone else tried Noni juice and it you have, did you feel any positive effects on your overall health?

Thanks!

~Punkin
 

CrankySpice

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I have not tried it nor have I heard of it before, but to be perfectly honest I'm skeptical of any "miracle cure" like this. I strongly suspect a lot of the recovery people experience from drinking new juices or taking supplements is caused by two things: Other steps they are taking at the same time to improve their health (i.e. more exercise, more fruits/veggies overall) and the strong psychological desire for improvement (i.e. mind over matter).

IF "Noni Juice" was indeed a miraculous cure for any ailment, it would've been studied up the wazoo and written about in reputable medical journals. If there is no scientific research to back up your husband's boss's claims...I'd stick to less expensive OJ. :)
 

Risible

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Ella, before you start taking it, you should do some research (try the National Institutes of Health website) to see what, if any, side effects this concoction has. Check specifically if there are any contraindications to medication you take; your pharmacist may be able to answer questions on that.
 

JoyJoy

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We used to have a guy around here who pushed this stuff heavily. It's often sold by MLMs whose eye is on the bottom line, and based on the things I've read, they'll claim just about anything to sell it.

Ella, I agree with Risible on doing the research. There seems to be quite a bit about it online. Here's a little:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/noni/AN01074
There's no evidence that noni juice reduces cholesterol. Noni juice, which is made from a fruit (Morinda citrifolia) grown in the Asia-Pacific region, has gained popularity as a tonic for everything from arthritis and depression to heart disease and cancer. But there is insufficient reliable data about its effectiveness in treating any of these conditions.
As with many fruits, the noni fruit is a source of vitamins and minerals, as well as antioxidants. Antioxidants appear to protect the body from age-related changes and certain diseases. Although the juice has an unpleasant taste and odor, it is generally safe to drink. However, noni juice is high in potassium. For this reason, it should be used with caution — if at all — in people with chronic kidney disease or who take potassium-sparing diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) because it could cause dangerously elevated blood levels of potassium (hyperkalemia).
From here (emphasis mine):

Regulatory warnings and safety testing

In August 2004, the US Food and Drug Administration issued a warning letter to Flora, Inc. for violating section 201(g)(1) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the Act) [21 U.S.C. § 321(g)(1)]. Flora made twelve unfounded health claims about the purported benefits of noni juice as a medical product, in effect causing the juice to be evaluated as a drug. Under the Act, this necessitates all safety and clinical trial evidence for the juice providing such effects in humans. [17]
The FDA letter also cited 1) absent scientific evidence for health benefits of noni phytochemicals, scopoletin and damnacanthal, neither of which has been confirmed with biological activity in humans, and 2) lack of scientific foundation for health claims made by two proponents of noni juice, Dr. Isabella Abbot and Dr. Ralph Heinicke[18].
Two other FDA letters have been issued for the same types of violations[19][20].
In the European Union, after safety testing on one particular brand of noni juice (Tahitian Noni), approval was granted in 2002 as a novel food by the European Commission for Health and Consumer Protection Directorate-General. [21] In their report, the European Commission's Scientific Committee made no endorsement of health claims.
No noni products have achieved sufficient scientific foundation for being licensed as medicines or therapies. Companies today must still apply to the European Commission for Health and Consumer Protection Directorate-General to have their own brand of noni juice included as a novel food under the initial approval.

Health and research issues

In 2005, two scientific publications described incidents of acute hepatitis caused by ingesting noni. One study suggested the toxin to be anthraquinones, found in roots, leaves and fruit of the noni,[22] [23]while the other named juice as the delivery method.[24]
This was, however, followed by a publication [25] showing that noni juice 1) was not toxic to the liver even when consumed in high doses, and 2) contained low quantities of anthraquinones which are potentially toxic to liver tissue.[26]
The potential for toxicity caused by noni juices remains under surveillance by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA)[27], individual food safety authorities in France[28], Finland[29] and Ireland[30], and medical investigators in Germany[31].
The Physicians Desk Reference ("PDR") for Non-Prescription Drugs and Dietary Supplements lists only one particular commercial brand of noni juice, with no side-effects mentioned.[32]Consumers of noni juice are advised to carefully check labels for warnings which may say, "Not safe for pregnant women" or "Keep out of reach of children."
Some commercial brands of noni juice can be high in potassium[citation needed]. While potassium is a valuable nutrient in a normal diet, persons with advanced kidney disease cannot excrete it properly and should avoid noni juice which has been known to cause hyperkalemia.[33]. Of related significance is a report showing high variability in mineral contents between various brands of noni juice.[34]
Athletes intending to use noni juice to supplement their diet should be aware that two brands of noni juice are listed on ConsumerLab.com's "Athletic Banned Substance Screening Program" as having been screened for substances on the World Anti-Doping Code Prohibited List.[35].
http://cbs2.com/goldstein/Noni.Juice.Tahitian.2.513423.html
http://headaches.about.com/cs/alternative/a/noni_juice.htm
 

JerseyGirl07093

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I've heard of it and to me it reminds me of your typical 'snake oil'. The magic potion to cure everything. You'll lose weight, lower your cholesterol, improve eyesight, grow hair, have more energy, better sex drive, cure cancer, make the blind see, people in wheelchairs walk...you get the idea. How can one thing amazingly cure everything? They're selling, but I ain't buying! :p
 

Punkin1024

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Thank you everyone for your responses. When any one product makes so many claims to improve health, I approach it skeptically. I have read a few reports on Noni juice that were not very encouraging, so that is why I posted a query here. Hubby seems convinced that the stuff is good because his boss is so happy taking it (he consumes a few ounces daily). I think I will get hubby to read a bit more on the substance before he becomes enamored with it because he wouldn't want to damage his liver.

~Punkin
 

comperic2003

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It is a freaking pyramid scheme. Sure, berries and the antioxidants they carry are great for you, but just eat some blueberries.
 
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