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Still a Skye fan

Normalcy is overrated
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Hmmm...I'm currently re-reading some Sherlock Holmes tales by Arthur Conan Doyle.

I recently read a biography of Doyle and hadn't read any Holmes tales probably since 6th or 7th grade.

For a Victorian era writer, I happen to think Doyle was pretty good and re-reading the Holmes stories as an adult has been fun.
 

Rojodi

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Reading a free Harlequin Intrigue novel to get a feel on who they're written. It was suggested to me to read one or two and write my own with BBW characters.
 

fat9276

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Re-reading (for the umpteenth time) The Long Walk by Stephen King (aka Richard Bachman at the time of it's release).

This one is probably my favorite along with Lisey's Story. If people look past the horror genre, they will find he is an exceptional writer and soooo freaking funny!

He is also responsible for me never sleeping with closet doors open since I was a teen. Don't ever read his short story about the boogeyman! :eek:
 

Blackjack

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Re-reading (for the umpteenth time) The Long Walk by Stephen King (aka Richard Bachman at the time of it's release).

This one is probably my favorite along with Lisey's Story. If people look past the horror genre, they will find he is an exceptional writer and soooo freaking funny!

He is also responsible for me never sleeping with closet doors open since I was a teen. Don't ever read his short story about the boogeyman! :eek:
I read The Long Walk earlier this year. It's pretty bleak, definitely macabre, and lacks some of the polish of King's later works, but it's really fucking good.

I feel like he's more a master of the short story rather than the novel- he tends to lose the thread a bit in a lot of his longer works- but "1408", "The Raft", "The Jaunt", and quite a few other shorts pack one hell of a punch and end before he can spin off into weirdness that doesn't fit.
 

Still a Skye fan

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Let's see...

With the new "It" movie coming out soon, I'm currently re-reading the Stephen King book which I probably last read sometime in 1986-87? Yeah, it's been a while.

Anyway, for a book set partially in the "modern" era of 1986 and the past of 1958, I found myself slipping back into it immediately and it's still as great as I remembered it.

Yes, I was a misfit kid too and would've gotten along great with King's cast of kid "Losers".

Out of curiosity, I recently watched the 1990 "It" mini-series, which I don't think I've seen in probably 15-20 years and forgotten about its many flaws.

Okay, it's 1990 TV and obviously the special effects are limited and cheesy.

Tim Curry was as marvelous as Pennywise as I remembered him:eek: Except his English accent slips out a couple times.

The actors playing the kids and their adult counterparts were all fine. I'd forgotten that a very young Seth Green played young Richie Tozier. I also forgot about Richard Thomas with a ponytail (Oy!)

Plus I forgot how much I miss John Ritter:(

One little nit-picky thing: The girl playing young Beverly and Annette O'Toole as the adult Beverly weren't redheads. I mean, the scene where Ben Hanscom writes her the haiku about her red hair made no sense.

I remember watching this on TV and thinking it needed another two episodes to do King's layered tale justice. Over the course of its two episodes, the story is VERY choppy and needed to be fleshed out more.

Don't get me started on the adults' "showdown" with "It", which turns out to be a giant spider which looks like a bad Ray Harryhausen stop motion monster. Yes, they should've brought Ray out of retirement to do the monster.

So, "It", the book, is still great. "It", the 1990 TV mini-series, is ... Okay, at best, but it should've been lots better.
 

MattB

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I'll watch the 1990 version of 'IT' anytime it's on, solely for Tim Curry's performance. The flaws are massive, but Curry dominates.

I started reading "On The Road" by Kerouac for the first time in ages, but I'm not getting into it.
 

Yakatori

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Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance -Robert M. Pirsig

Dusted off an old, moldy copy sitting on shelf I haven't even looked at in a while. Old books, from another life, when I was still collecting them, taking them and passing them on among school friends. The inscription bringing back memories, of relations since past.
 

Cynthia

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Buddhaland Brooklyn, by Richard Morais, is the story of sheltered Japanese priest who reluctantly travels to America to help New Yorkers build a temple. His experiences cause him to rethink his cultural biases and how he chooses to remember a painful childhood.

Found it for $1! I've been going on book treasure hunts at the dollar store lately. It's a great way to get out of the rut of going in a large bookstore and habitually heading for the same favorite sections. I never know what underappreciated gems might be on the few haphazardly organized shelves in a dollar store, and they're often works that I might not notice in a Barnes & Noble.
 

fat9276

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I read The Long Walk earlier this year. It's pretty bleak, definitely macabre, and lacks some of the polish of King's later works, but it's really fucking good.

I feel like he's more a master of the short story rather than the novel- he tends to lose the thread a bit in a lot of his longer works- but "1408", "The Raft", "The Jaunt", and quite a few other shorts pack one hell of a punch and end before he can spin off into weirdness that doesn't fit.
Yeah, he does tend to go off on weird tangents. My brother in law once said he couldn't end a novel to save his life haha. I also agree his short stories are better and so good. A lot of people do not even realize Shawshank Redemption is an adaptation from one of them (Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption).
 

Tad

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Just recently started "Ready Player One" by Ernest Cline. If you grew up in the 80s and especially if you grew up as a nerd in the 80s, you may enjoy this. In brief in a dystopian near future, the world's biggest treasure hunt is all based on having an encyclopedic knowledge of 80s pop culture and nerd culture. So far serious shout outs to the Dungeons and Dragons adventure "Tomb of Horrors," the arcade video game "Joust" and the movie "War Games," among tons of more casual references.

Whether or not it is any good as a novel I'm not sure yet, but I'm having fun reading it for sure :)
 

Still a Skye fan

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Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance -Robert M. Pirsig

Dusted off an old, moldy copy sitting on shelf I haven't even looked at in a while. Old books, from another life, when I was still collecting them, taking them and passing them on among school friends. The inscription bringing back memories, of relations since past.
Good choice and a great book. I still have my copy from my college days.:happy:
 

FluffyButterfly80

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I am also reading Steven Kings IT in light of the movie coming out! This is my first time reading it though I have seen the tv mini series [emoji5]


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

BurgerMePlease

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I'm about halfway through Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy. It's not something I would normally read but thought I'd give it a shot.
 

Tad

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After skipping it for a couple of years, doing a day-by-day reading of Roger Zelazney's "A Night in the Lonesome October" again. We had a tradition going for a few years prior to that break. We are all enjoying doing it again. The book is narrated by Snuff, dog of Jack (probably 'the Ripper'), documenting their efforts to save the world. With appearances from most of the characters of Victorian gothic horror (plus 'The Great Detective'). One of my favorite pieces of writing anywhere.

And on my own I just finished the contemporary fantasy novel "Flex" which, IDK, had some interesting world building but the characters and plot just didn't live up to that in my opinion.
 

Rojodi

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I'm almost done with "Sherlock Holmes vs Cthulhu: The Adventure of the Deadly Dimensions" by Lois Gresh.

Holmes & Watson battle a cult of Dagon worshippers! A crazy premise but it's a fun book.
I read "The Holmes-Dracula File" in high school, then when I returned to college. It's a different spin on the Holmes fiction.
 

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